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This topic contains 548 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Thomas_Tennis 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 466 through 480 (of 552 total)
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  • #941 Reply

    Luan

    Hi Thomas,

    I’m 25 and got back to playing 6 months ago after a 7 years break. Got a Aeropro Drive GT 2013 to restart and now facing TE issues. First advice at the doctor was to review equipment choices.
    I was looking for some of the tips you posted and found two new possible options, they are the following :

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/reviews/DBF2T/DBF2Treview.html

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/reviews/DBF5/DBF5Review.html

    I would rather go with Dunlop F2.0 Tour, considering the headsize and balance. But i also would like to have a good access to spin.

    What do you think about them ?

    Thanks in advance.

    #940 Reply

    Neto

    Thomas, tks for your reply. I took your advice to my local tennis shop and for my surprise when discussing with the “expert” there he was surprised with the racquets I was looking for to reduce my tennis elbow pain. According to him all the tennis racquets you recommend are the heaviest options in the market and it does not make sense in his mind. He said your thought process makes sense in theory but in practice it doesn’t work. According to him he suggested these two racquets as the best for tennis elbow: Volkl Organix 5 or ProKennex Ionic Ki 15. What are your thoughts? Tks!!

    #939 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Looking at the specs the Head Youtek Graphene Speed Pro, is a decent arm-friendly racquet due to its weight and head light balance, however it is a bit to stiff to be considered a top arm-friendly racquet

    #938 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Babolat Aerop Pro Drive has been notorious for arm problems. The Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT (95), Prince EXO3 Rebel (95) and Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16×18 are all excellent choices and will be a huge improvement. You could stay with Babolat by going with the Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT, personally my favorite is the Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16×18, great for generating extra spin.

    #937 Reply

    John

    Hi Thomas, Thank you very much for posting your arm-friendly recommendations. What do you think of the new Djokovic racquet, the Head Youtek Graphene Speed Pro?

    #936 Reply

    Neto

    Hi Thomas. Tks for all this great info. I am in the early 40’s and getting back to playing tennis after more than 10 years without touching a racquet. I would say I am low intermediate player and after trying many racquets I ended up buying a 2012 Babolat Aerop Pro Drive. I have been playing with this racquet for 4 months and although I loved it the feeling I started to feel a lot of pain in my elbow and it is now unbearable to a point I can’t play anymore. I had the Babolat Xcel string and switched to Babolat VS Natural Gut at 55lbs but still not feeling much better on my elbow. I found your website and wanted to get your opinion between these racquets: Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT (95), Prince EXO3 Rebel (95) and Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16×18. Which one would you recommend? Tks!!

    #935 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Yes the Prince EX03 Tour is definately more arm-friendly than the Prince EXO3 White it is more flexible and is on my list of top 10 arm-friendly racquets.

    #934 Reply

    Julian

    I recently got myself a used Prince EXO3 White because I read that it is really arm friendly. I like it so far. It seems a lot softer on my arm than my previous Wilsons. Now reading that the EXO3 Tour might be even better on the arm got me thinking again. What is your opinion.

    #933 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    You are right that adding lead tape in the handle will help make the racquet more arm-friendly by making it more head light balanced and increasing the overall weight. Of the strings you mentioned I would lean towards the Technifibre NR2 which is extremely elastic and is one of my top 10 recommendations.

    #932 Reply

    Cae

    Hello Thomas,

    I’ve undergone two arthroscopic shoulder surgeries on my dominant arm, due to joint instability (labrum tears) and am looking for a racquet to suit my playing style that’ll also allow for maximum comfort. I am a NTRP 4.0 player, age 30 and I’m looking for a racquet that will provide support for my spin-oriented style. I’m currently using a Fischer Pro Extreme FT Air Carbon, which is an interesting racquet, but getting a bit old. I’ve screened quite a few racquets so far and I’ve managed to narrow down my current choices to the following with a list of concerns with each:

    Babolat Pure Storm Ltd GT (18/20 string pattern, low swing weight)
    Wilson BLX Pro Staff 90 (small head size, high weight, stiffness 65, otherwise very intrigued by this racquet)
    Wilson BLX Pro Staff 95 (low power in reviews)
    Head Youtek IG Radical Pro (only 3pts headlight, 34cm)
    Dunlop Biomimetic Max 200G (low power and stiffness 65)
    Prince Exo3 Tour 100 16/18 (very flexible, apparently the fell is weird and some felt that it lacks control)

    I’m planning to use natural gut strings perhaps combined with poly or maybe Luxilon Alu.

    I’m trying to narrow down the list to about 2-4 racquets which I’ll then demo before I make the final choice. Any help in regards to narrowing the list down or maybe finding a racquet that’s best suited to my needs would be greatly appreciated.

    #931 Reply

    Vittorio

    Hi Thomas, first of all thank you so much for what you are doing, it’s very informative.
    I own a few Head Prestige Liquidmetal MP racquets and I like the way they play very much, but at times I tend to get a stiff arm.
    The stiffness is 64 so at the limit of being an arm friendly racquet.
    What if I add some lead tape around the handle or add weight inside the handle to change the specs around?
    Technically this should make it more head light, increase the total weight of the racquet and lower the swing weight, all good things to make it more arm friendly based on your info.
    Do you think that by adding something like 15-20 grams of weight would do the trick and make the racquet more arm friendly?
    I have already added about 4 grams in total at 3 and 9 o’clock for stability and plow trough but of course by doing so I made it a bit more head heavy and increased the swing weight which are bad for my arm.
    One more question, between Tecnifibre NRG 2 and X-one Biphase, which one do you suggest being more arm friendly?

    Thank you so much for your help.

    #930 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    It sounds like you really did your research and came up with excellent choices. Good luck!

    #929 Reply

    Raheel Chohan

    Hi Thomas,
    I really appreciate the great information you have provided here to help naive tennis players like me. I am just getting over a bout of tennis elbow that took me 4-6 weeks by using the ‘Tyler Twist’ technique with flex bars. I am looking to get the following frame configuration and would definitely love to hear your thoughts on it:

    – ProKennex Heritage Type C Redondo MidPlus
    – Head size: 98 in
    – Technifibre NRG2 16 – Mains
    – Technifibre NRG2 17 – Crosses
    – Strung at 50lbs

    #928 Reply

    Eric

    Hi again Thomas,
    How do you explain such a difference of “evaluation” in the Prince Rebel (95) swingweight between Tennis Express (300) and Tennis Warehouse (331). 31 is a huge difference on a crucial aspect to decide to go with that model or not. There is also a difference in the balance: 10 Headlight for TE and 7 for TW. Thank you in helping figure that out.

    #927 Reply

    Luis

    Thank you very much!

  • Author
    Posts
  • #941 Reply

    Luan
    • Offline

    Hi Thomas,

    I’m 25 and got back to playing 6 months ago after a 7 years break. Got a Aeropro Drive GT 2013 to restart and now facing TE issues. First advice at the doctor was to review equipment choices.
    I was looking for some of the tips you posted and found two new possible options, they are the following :

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/reviews/DBF2T/DBF2Treview.html

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/reviews/DBF5/DBF5Review.html

    I would rather go with Dunlop F2.0 Tour, considering the headsize and balance. But i also would like to have a good access to spin.

    What do you think about them ?

    Thanks in advance.

    #940 Reply

    Neto
    • Offline

    Thomas, tks for your reply. I took your advice to my local tennis shop and for my surprise when discussing with the “expert” there he was surprised with the racquets I was looking for to reduce my tennis elbow pain. According to him all the tennis racquets you recommend are the heaviest options in the market and it does not make sense in his mind. He said your thought process makes sense in theory but in practice it doesn’t work. According to him he suggested these two racquets as the best for tennis elbow: Volkl Organix 5 or ProKennex Ionic Ki 15. What are your thoughts? Tks!!

    #939 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Looking at the specs the Head Youtek Graphene Speed Pro, is a decent arm-friendly racquet due to its weight and head light balance, however it is a bit to stiff to be considered a top arm-friendly racquet

    #938 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    The Babolat Aerop Pro Drive has been notorious for arm problems. The Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT (95), Prince EXO3 Rebel (95) and Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16×18 are all excellent choices and will be a huge improvement. You could stay with Babolat by going with the Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT, personally my favorite is the Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16×18, great for generating extra spin.

    #937 Reply

    John
    • Offline

    Hi Thomas, Thank you very much for posting your arm-friendly recommendations. What do you think of the new Djokovic racquet, the Head Youtek Graphene Speed Pro?

    #936 Reply

    Neto
    • Offline

    Hi Thomas. Tks for all this great info. I am in the early 40’s and getting back to playing tennis after more than 10 years without touching a racquet. I would say I am low intermediate player and after trying many racquets I ended up buying a 2012 Babolat Aerop Pro Drive. I have been playing with this racquet for 4 months and although I loved it the feeling I started to feel a lot of pain in my elbow and it is now unbearable to a point I can’t play anymore. I had the Babolat Xcel string and switched to Babolat VS Natural Gut at 55lbs but still not feeling much better on my elbow. I found your website and wanted to get your opinion between these racquets: Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT (95), Prince EXO3 Rebel (95) and Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16×18. Which one would you recommend? Tks!!

    #935 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Yes the Prince EX03 Tour is definately more arm-friendly than the Prince EXO3 White it is more flexible and is on my list of top 10 arm-friendly racquets.

    #934 Reply

    Julian
    • Offline

    I recently got myself a used Prince EXO3 White because I read that it is really arm friendly. I like it so far. It seems a lot softer on my arm than my previous Wilsons. Now reading that the EXO3 Tour might be even better on the arm got me thinking again. What is your opinion.

    #933 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    You are right that adding lead tape in the handle will help make the racquet more arm-friendly by making it more head light balanced and increasing the overall weight. Of the strings you mentioned I would lean towards the Technifibre NR2 which is extremely elastic and is one of my top 10 recommendations.

    #932 Reply

    Cae
    • Offline

    Hello Thomas,

    I’ve undergone two arthroscopic shoulder surgeries on my dominant arm, due to joint instability (labrum tears) and am looking for a racquet to suit my playing style that’ll also allow for maximum comfort. I am a NTRP 4.0 player, age 30 and I’m looking for a racquet that will provide support for my spin-oriented style. I’m currently using a Fischer Pro Extreme FT Air Carbon, which is an interesting racquet, but getting a bit old. I’ve screened quite a few racquets so far and I’ve managed to narrow down my current choices to the following with a list of concerns with each:

    Babolat Pure Storm Ltd GT (18/20 string pattern, low swing weight)
    Wilson BLX Pro Staff 90 (small head size, high weight, stiffness 65, otherwise very intrigued by this racquet)
    Wilson BLX Pro Staff 95 (low power in reviews)
    Head Youtek IG Radical Pro (only 3pts headlight, 34cm)
    Dunlop Biomimetic Max 200G (low power and stiffness 65)
    Prince Exo3 Tour 100 16/18 (very flexible, apparently the fell is weird and some felt that it lacks control)

    I’m planning to use natural gut strings perhaps combined with poly or maybe Luxilon Alu.

    I’m trying to narrow down the list to about 2-4 racquets which I’ll then demo before I make the final choice. Any help in regards to narrowing the list down or maybe finding a racquet that’s best suited to my needs would be greatly appreciated.

    #931 Reply

    Vittorio
    • Offline

    Hi Thomas, first of all thank you so much for what you are doing, it’s very informative.
    I own a few Head Prestige Liquidmetal MP racquets and I like the way they play very much, but at times I tend to get a stiff arm.
    The stiffness is 64 so at the limit of being an arm friendly racquet.
    What if I add some lead tape around the handle or add weight inside the handle to change the specs around?
    Technically this should make it more head light, increase the total weight of the racquet and lower the swing weight, all good things to make it more arm friendly based on your info.
    Do you think that by adding something like 15-20 grams of weight would do the trick and make the racquet more arm friendly?
    I have already added about 4 grams in total at 3 and 9 o’clock for stability and plow trough but of course by doing so I made it a bit more head heavy and increased the swing weight which are bad for my arm.
    One more question, between Tecnifibre NRG 2 and X-one Biphase, which one do you suggest being more arm friendly?

    Thank you so much for your help.

    #930 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    It sounds like you really did your research and came up with excellent choices. Good luck!

    #929 Reply

    Raheel Chohan
    • Offline

    Hi Thomas,
    I really appreciate the great information you have provided here to help naive tennis players like me. I am just getting over a bout of tennis elbow that took me 4-6 weeks by using the ‘Tyler Twist’ technique with flex bars. I am looking to get the following frame configuration and would definitely love to hear your thoughts on it:

    – ProKennex Heritage Type C Redondo MidPlus
    – Head size: 98 in
    – Technifibre NRG2 16 – Mains
    – Technifibre NRG2 17 – Crosses
    – Strung at 50lbs

    #928 Reply

    Eric
    • Offline

    Hi again Thomas,
    How do you explain such a difference of “evaluation” in the Prince Rebel (95) swingweight between Tennis Express (300) and Tennis Warehouse (331). 31 is a huge difference on a crucial aspect to decide to go with that model or not. There is also a difference in the balance: 10 Headlight for TE and 7 for TW. Thank you in helping figure that out.

    #927 Reply

    Luis
    • Offline

    Thank you very much!

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