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This topic contains 550 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Thomas Tennis Thomas Tennis 3 weeks, 6 days ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 554 total)
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  • #60604 Reply

    Gustavo

    Thomas:

    Thank you very much. Regards. Gustavo.

    #60598 Reply

    Ted Murphy

    I have a damaged elbow from playing with dead strings and hitting with too open a stance on my forehand. It requires surgery to heal and I’m not up to having it. I have changed from a semi-western forehand grip to an Eastern so that I cannot hit the ball as hard. It has helped.

    Here are additional findings: I like denser string patterns (18 x 20) because I can string the racquet looser without losing control. (The dense string bed plays stiffer than an open one and the ball will come in contact with more string to enhance control.) Also, I like thicker strings (15L) to enhance control and durability on loose string jobs.

    Multifilament strings are best – they are softer. Likewise with natural gut. Avoid stiff strings (esp. stiff polyester ones). Experiment with looser strings as they have less vibration and enhance stability.

    Larger head frames are best – they are more forgiving. However, few have dense string patterns. Don’t go too big or you will lose some maneuverability. A larger head will also be more stable and put less pressure on the hand to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand.

    Slightly head heavy frames (1-2 points head heavy) are best because they absorb shock well and slow a player’s swing. The slower the swing, the less shock on the arm/elbow/wrist. A head heavy frame is also more stable. I bought a Head Microgel Oversize and added lead tape at the 3 and 9 o’clock positions of the head to reduce shock. It helped a lot!

    Flexible racquets are best but too flexible ones may have vibration. Always check a frame’s RA (stiffness level) and think twice before buying a frame with a 68 RA measurement or higher. I prefer an RA rating of about 60.

    Standard 27 inch frames are best as they are easier to swing, requiring less effort on the arm. That being said, I have a 27.5″ frame that is oversize and I play well with it. I let the frame do the work and focus on making contact in the sweet spot. It’s important to watch the ball hitting the strings so that it hits the sweet spot more often. The additional length gives me more spin, better reach and more power with less effort. (It’s a slightly head heavy frame.)

    Use as large a grip size as is comfortable – you will not have to squeeze the grip as hard to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand. If you like head light frames, get a heavy one (11 ounces or more) to reduce shock and twisting. I also like a flatter grip shape, e.g., Volkl frames, to enhance stability on my Eastern grip forehand.

    Select a frame with good vibration dampening abilities, e.g., with Textreme (or similar shock decreasing product like Countervail), a built in string vibration dampener in the bridge or large grommets / ports.

    Correct poor technique. Try to use less wrist on your shots; use more shoulder turn instead. Take a lesson if necessary to correct your technique if needed.

    I hope this helps.

    #60596 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Thomas,
    The Yonex DR 98 would be better for your arm than the Head YOUTEK IG Speed 300, since it is signficialy more flexible and more head lite balanced, however the Yonex DR 100 would not be better because it is a stiffer frame.

    #60595 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Jodi,
    There is no specific timetable as to when I update my top 10 list. I do it one at a time depending on when I find something that is better than something else currently on the list

    #60594 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Jodi,
    I think that as a 3.0 club/social player the Wilson Blade 104 is ideal and the Wilson NXT is also a great choice, if you string it at 50 lbs it will be even easier on your arm, and give you some more power although it would be harder to control.

    #60567 Reply

    thomas

    Hey Thomas,i am about to take a hard decision these days,i am a big hitter with lots of spin and the couple of years i am playing with the head utek speed mp 300,stifness 60,recently i demo a yonex dr 98 and dr 100 although i really liked it i am not sure if its more arm friendly from my head and beacause i have a sore shoulder and elbow,whats your opinion?

    #60533 Reply

    Jodi Freedman

    Hi Again,

    Just wondering, will you be updating your charts of preferred racquets and strings soon?

    Thanks!

    #60532 Reply

    Jodi Freedman

    Hi,
    So glad you just sent the link for the Wilson Blade 104. I am demo=ing the 98 as well as the 104, and trying to decide. I’m a 3.0-ish club/social player, and have had elbow problems. I felt that the 104 played easier, but the 98 felt better to my arm (although I felt that I had to hit the ball spot-on, really no forgiveness like the 104’s sweet spot.) Both demos had Wilson NXT 17, strung 55 TENSION (RE- MY ARM TROUBLES)

    SO- Any preference between the two? What about string? I previously used the Weiss canon explosive you recommended, and had no problems- although the pro didn’t like stringing it.

    What do you think?
    Thank-you!

    #60511 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Gustavo,
    I would like to tell you that the Wilson Blade 98 would be much better for you than the Wilson Blade 104 but I am not sure that is true because the Wilson Blade 104 is an arm friendly racquet and is very flexible. If you are playing at a high level against a lot of hard hitters the extra weight in the Wilson Blade 98 would help more.

    #60510 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Gustavo,
    I would like to tell you that the Wilson Blade 98 would be much better for you than the Wilson Blade 104 but I am not sure that is true because the Wilson Blade 104 is an arm friendly racquet and is very flexible. If you are playing at a high level against a lot of hard hitters the extra weight in the Wilson Blade 98 would help more.

    #60487 Reply

    Gustavo

    Thomas:

    I´m trying to come back to tennis after a pair of years. Two month ago, after 5 matches I started with tennis elbow. The pain is still there. I was playing with a new wilson blade 104. Do you think this racket could affect my elbow? Is the blade 98 so much better for my elbow? Regards. Gustavo.

    #60293 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Katie,
    I see why you would have had elbow problems with the Wilson Juice 108, this is a very typical racquet for giving users elbow problems, mis-recommended to many beginners having the combination of very high stiffness and lightweight. The Wilson Juice spin is a small step in the right direction since it is a bit heavier and the open spin pattern helps it to play a little more flexible, however I would still give it a low rating. Moving to the Head Radical MPA 16×16 should have helped, but it seems you may need something even more flexible, such as the Yonex EZONE DR98 or possibly the KENNEX QI K TOUR 295 if you are more comfortable with something lighter weight. Also you can try stringer with slightly less tension and changing from the Gamma TNT2 to the Gamma Live Wire

    #60235 Reply

    Katie

    Hi,
    When I started playing tennis 4 years ago, I used the Wilson Juice 108 and developed tennis elbow fairly quickly. I played through the pain and assumed that as my form improved that the pain would go away. However, once I switched to the Wilson Juice Spin all my elbow pain disappeared. Back in March of this year, I switched to the Head Radical MPA and the elbow pain came back. I loved the power and feel of the racquet so I continued to use it. Now the pain is nearly unbearable – although I can still play, it hurts afterwards. After reading your article above, I think the answer is my equipment. Can you suggest a good racquet for me to demo? I usually string my racquets with Wilson Revolve at 55 on the mains and Gamma TNT2 at 58 on the crosses. I am currently using the 16×16 pattern on the Radical. Is there another string combo that you would suggest for power that is arm friendly? Thanks for your help!
    Katie

    #60108 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Mohan,
    You can’t get more arm friendly than a Yonex DR 98 Ezone strung with gut at a low tension.

    #60102 Reply

    Mohan

    Hi Thomas,
    I was playing with wilson prostaff 27 LS with natural gut strings . The strings moved SO MUCH that I raised the tension slowly up to 58.
    Now bad tennis elbow. After 2 week break planning to try yonex ezone dr 98 with natural gut at 46 tension. Good idea?

  • Author
    Posts
  • #60604 Reply

    Gustavo
    • Offline

    Thomas:

    Thank you very much. Regards. Gustavo.

    #60598 Reply

    Ted Murphy
    • Offline

    I have a damaged elbow from playing with dead strings and hitting with too open a stance on my forehand. It requires surgery to heal and I’m not up to having it. I have changed from a semi-western forehand grip to an Eastern so that I cannot hit the ball as hard. It has helped.

    Here are additional findings: I like denser string patterns (18 x 20) because I can string the racquet looser without losing control. (The dense string bed plays stiffer than an open one and the ball will come in contact with more string to enhance control.) Also, I like thicker strings (15L) to enhance control and durability on loose string jobs.

    Multifilament strings are best – they are softer. Likewise with natural gut. Avoid stiff strings (esp. stiff polyester ones). Experiment with looser strings as they have less vibration and enhance stability.

    Larger head frames are best – they are more forgiving. However, few have dense string patterns. Don’t go too big or you will lose some maneuverability. A larger head will also be more stable and put less pressure on the hand to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand.

    Slightly head heavy frames (1-2 points head heavy) are best because they absorb shock well and slow a player’s swing. The slower the swing, the less shock on the arm/elbow/wrist. A head heavy frame is also more stable. I bought a Head Microgel Oversize and added lead tape at the 3 and 9 o’clock positions of the head to reduce shock. It helped a lot!

    Flexible racquets are best but too flexible ones may have vibration. Always check a frame’s RA (stiffness level) and think twice before buying a frame with a 68 RA measurement or higher. I prefer an RA rating of about 60.

    Standard 27 inch frames are best as they are easier to swing, requiring less effort on the arm. That being said, I have a 27.5″ frame that is oversize and I play well with it. I let the frame do the work and focus on making contact in the sweet spot. It’s important to watch the ball hitting the strings so that it hits the sweet spot more often. The additional length gives me more spin, better reach and more power with less effort. (It’s a slightly head heavy frame.)

    Use as large a grip size as is comfortable – you will not have to squeeze the grip as hard to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand. If you like head light frames, get a heavy one (11 ounces or more) to reduce shock and twisting. I also like a flatter grip shape, e.g., Volkl frames, to enhance stability on my Eastern grip forehand.

    Select a frame with good vibration dampening abilities, e.g., with Textreme (or similar shock decreasing product like Countervail), a built in string vibration dampener in the bridge or large grommets / ports.

    Correct poor technique. Try to use less wrist on your shots; use more shoulder turn instead. Take a lesson if necessary to correct your technique if needed.

    I hope this helps.

    #60596 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Thomas,
    The Yonex DR 98 would be better for your arm than the Head YOUTEK IG Speed 300, since it is signficialy more flexible and more head lite balanced, however the Yonex DR 100 would not be better because it is a stiffer frame.

    #60595 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Jodi,
    There is no specific timetable as to when I update my top 10 list. I do it one at a time depending on when I find something that is better than something else currently on the list

    #60594 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Jodi,
    I think that as a 3.0 club/social player the Wilson Blade 104 is ideal and the Wilson NXT is also a great choice, if you string it at 50 lbs it will be even easier on your arm, and give you some more power although it would be harder to control.

    #60567 Reply

    thomas
    • Offline

    Hey Thomas,i am about to take a hard decision these days,i am a big hitter with lots of spin and the couple of years i am playing with the head utek speed mp 300,stifness 60,recently i demo a yonex dr 98 and dr 100 although i really liked it i am not sure if its more arm friendly from my head and beacause i have a sore shoulder and elbow,whats your opinion?

    #60533 Reply

    Jodi Freedman
    • Offline

    Hi Again,

    Just wondering, will you be updating your charts of preferred racquets and strings soon?

    Thanks!

    #60532 Reply

    Jodi Freedman
    • Offline

    Hi,
    So glad you just sent the link for the Wilson Blade 104. I am demo=ing the 98 as well as the 104, and trying to decide. I’m a 3.0-ish club/social player, and have had elbow problems. I felt that the 104 played easier, but the 98 felt better to my arm (although I felt that I had to hit the ball spot-on, really no forgiveness like the 104’s sweet spot.) Both demos had Wilson NXT 17, strung 55 TENSION (RE- MY ARM TROUBLES)

    SO- Any preference between the two? What about string? I previously used the Weiss canon explosive you recommended, and had no problems- although the pro didn’t like stringing it.

    What do you think?
    Thank-you!

    #60511 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Gustavo,
    I would like to tell you that the Wilson Blade 98 would be much better for you than the Wilson Blade 104 but I am not sure that is true because the Wilson Blade 104 is an arm friendly racquet and is very flexible. If you are playing at a high level against a lot of hard hitters the extra weight in the Wilson Blade 98 would help more.

    #60510 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Gustavo,
    I would like to tell you that the Wilson Blade 98 would be much better for you than the Wilson Blade 104 but I am not sure that is true because the Wilson Blade 104 is an arm friendly racquet and is very flexible. If you are playing at a high level against a lot of hard hitters the extra weight in the Wilson Blade 98 would help more.

    #60487 Reply

    Gustavo
    • Offline

    Thomas:

    I´m trying to come back to tennis after a pair of years. Two month ago, after 5 matches I started with tennis elbow. The pain is still there. I was playing with a new wilson blade 104. Do you think this racket could affect my elbow? Is the blade 98 so much better for my elbow? Regards. Gustavo.

    #60293 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Katie,
    I see why you would have had elbow problems with the Wilson Juice 108, this is a very typical racquet for giving users elbow problems, mis-recommended to many beginners having the combination of very high stiffness and lightweight. The Wilson Juice spin is a small step in the right direction since it is a bit heavier and the open spin pattern helps it to play a little more flexible, however I would still give it a low rating. Moving to the Head Radical MPA 16×16 should have helped, but it seems you may need something even more flexible, such as the Yonex EZONE DR98 or possibly the KENNEX QI K TOUR 295 if you are more comfortable with something lighter weight. Also you can try stringer with slightly less tension and changing from the Gamma TNT2 to the Gamma Live Wire

    #60235 Reply

    Katie
    • Offline

    Hi,
    When I started playing tennis 4 years ago, I used the Wilson Juice 108 and developed tennis elbow fairly quickly. I played through the pain and assumed that as my form improved that the pain would go away. However, once I switched to the Wilson Juice Spin all my elbow pain disappeared. Back in March of this year, I switched to the Head Radical MPA and the elbow pain came back. I loved the power and feel of the racquet so I continued to use it. Now the pain is nearly unbearable – although I can still play, it hurts afterwards. After reading your article above, I think the answer is my equipment. Can you suggest a good racquet for me to demo? I usually string my racquets with Wilson Revolve at 55 on the mains and Gamma TNT2 at 58 on the crosses. I am currently using the 16×16 pattern on the Radical. Is there another string combo that you would suggest for power that is arm friendly? Thanks for your help!
    Katie

    #60108 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Mohan,
    You can’t get more arm friendly than a Yonex DR 98 Ezone strung with gut at a low tension.

    #60102 Reply

    Mohan
    • Offline

    Hi Thomas,
    I was playing with wilson prostaff 27 LS with natural gut strings . The strings moved SO MUCH that I raised the tension slowly up to 58.
    Now bad tennis elbow. After 2 week break planning to try yonex ezone dr 98 with natural gut at 46 tension. Good idea?

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