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This topic contains 561 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Lucian T. Lucian T. 15 hours, 6 minutes ago.

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  • #61713
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian T.
    Participant

    Thomas,
    Please tell me you opinion about Wilson Blade 18×20 countervail (2017). Thank you in advance, Lucian

  • #61705
    Profile photo of Leandro
    Leandro
    Participant

    Hi Thomas!
    Im about to buy a new racquet because i developed Golfer’s Elbow (once again)

    I never had a problem playing with Babolat (Aeropro Drive 2013), but when i change my racquet to Babolat Pure Aero with a smaller grip size and strung with Luxilon Alu power, immediatily feel pain on my wrist and elbow.

    After 6 months recovery, i get back to my old Aeropro Drive 2013, and every two or three weeks, my elbow start to hurt again (Only Golfer’s Elbow pain)

    I get recommended to string with soft poly’s or multifilament, but if is possible i want to stay with poly strings because i play with a lot of spin and break string very often (2 or three weeks)

    Here my list of soft poly string:

    head lynx 18
    head sonic pro 17/16
    luxilon element 16
    babolat pro hurricane 18

    And about racquets, seller’s in my country give me these options:

    – Babolat Pure Aero Tour (strung at low 50’s)
    – Head Graphene Touch Instinct MP (adding lead tape at 3-9 and strung at 50lb)
    – Head Graphene Touch Speed Pro (strung at 50lb)
    – Head Graphene Touch Speed MP (adding lead tape at 3-9 and strung at 50lb)
    – Prince Textreme Warrior 100 (strung at 53lb)

    What about these options you recommend me?

    Thanks in advance!

    Sorry if i post twice 🙁

  • #61696
    Profile photo of Gustavo
    Gustavo
    Participant

    Hi Thomas. I need to buy new raquets. I´been with some tennis elbow problems. I was happy with de Wilson 2016 blade 104. but it´s not any more at my country, and the 2017 version is totally differnt. Could the Wilson blade 16×19 CV (2017) be a good option? I know is stiffer but it has the misterious CV. Maybe adding extra weight in the handle? I`d prefer the 16×19 over the 18×20 because of the extra spin. Regards. Gustavo

    • #61711
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Leonardo,
      Out of the choices that you list I would definitely go with the Graphene Touch Speed Pro it is a very arm elbow friendly racquet and is even one of the racquets currently on my top 10 list

  • #61633

    Jose Boni

    Hi Thomas, Thanks for the awesome information and advise you provide in thi site.

    I’d like your opinion on how should I pick among two racquets in your list: Yonex EZone DR 98 and Pro Kennex KI Q Tour. I am 47 y.o. intermediate player currently playing with a 7 y.o. Head Radical, pretty stiff. I have recently came back to courts after having suffered from elbow and shoulder injuries, so I’d like a racquet that is very easy on the arm while providing decent control. I play twice or may be three times a week, for a couple hours.

    Thanks a lot!

    Jose

  • #61570
    Profile photo of RICARDO SOARES
    RICARDO SOARES
    Participant

    Hi,Thomas!
    Great site!Congratulations for all the knowledge from here!

    I´m a 37ys intermediate player, and with tennis elbow.
    I´m playing with Wilson Blade 20×18(2015 model,not CV), with 22kg tension and NXT strings.
    In this site, you consider this an arm frindly racquet, but I think it´s too heavy for my game.
    I have a decent technique and I´m always struggling with this frame:(
    Can you advise me about some lighter frames and 100 head size(not 98,as the Blade) thast you may consider less stiffer than my actual frame?
    Are these good options below?:
    -Head Graphene XT Radical S
    -Wilson Blade 104(2015)
    -Yonex DR 100 Lite Version
    -Wilson Burn LS

    Thanks a lot!

  • #61555

    Rob

    I noticed that a lot of the racquets have a tighter string spacing e.g. 18×20. Is that just coincidental? Any feedback on string count, as I am
    thinking of less strings for more spin

    • #61561
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Rob,
      An open string pattern makes it easier to generate spin. It also creates a more flexible string bed and everything else being equal an open string pattern will be create less stress on your elbow.

    • #61560
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Rob,
      An open string pattern makes it easier to generate spin. It also creates a more flexible string bed and everything else being equal an open string pattern will be create less stress on your elbow.

  • #61540

    Mike Wood

    Thomas,
    I’m surprised to not see the Pro Kennex Classic 5G on your list of elbow-friendly rackets. It’s specifications are as good or better than most of the rackets on your list. A physical therapist (and 5.0 tennis player) recommended it to me 15 years ago and I still use it today with no elbow pain. I believe it is still Pro Kennex’s best-seller.

    Mike Wood

    • #61542
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mike,
      The Pro Kennex Classic 5G is a great arm friendly racquet. It is very similar to the Pro Kennex QI K5 315 which is even a bit more flexible and it also uses additional technology that makes it even more stable on impact.

  • #61049

    Sangam

    Hi Thomas,
    Thanks for the wonderful post.
    I am looking for arm friendly tennis racquets which are less than 300 grams. Can you recommend any?
    What is your opinion on the following:
    1) Pro Kennex Kinetic Q Tour 300
    2) Pro Kennex Kinetic Ki 5 280
    3) Pro Kennex kinetic Ki 15 260 G
    Thanks.

    • #61135
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Sangam,
      Of the 3 racquets you mention the one that is arm and elbow friendly is the Ki Q Tour 300.

  • #60761

    Andrew

    Hey Thomas,

    What are your thoughts on the Prince textreme warrior 107? I am hoping it is arm friendly enough that i don’t have to sell them and get the 100p! Been having arm and shoulder problems but could be attributed to me being excited to play again after two years and just overworking myself.

    Thank You!

  • #60731

    carrie

    What is your opinion re the headXTR speed grapheme Is it te same as the one on your list?
    Head XT Graphene MP

    • #60743

      Thomas_Tennis

      Carrie,
      There are a number of Head XT Graphene Speed Racquets so I do not know which one you are refering to and none of them are the same as the HEAD XT Graphene MP that is on my top 10 list

      • #60755

        carrie

        HI Thomas
        Thanx. But regarding the Head xt graphene mp on your list.. Is it the prestige? When I google it it comes as prestige or speed etc.

        Also…I do suffer from severe tennis elbow so which of your racquets is the very best one??
        Thanx.

         

         

        • #60780

          Thomas_Tennis

          Carrie,
          It is the Head Prestige, just click on the link. All 10 racquets in the top 10 list are very arm friendly, you just have to pick the one you personally like best and you cant go wrong

  • #60694

    Leandro

    Hello Thomas!

    I always play with Babolat rackets since i start playing tennis (13 years ago, now im 25) and never had a problem.
    I was playing with Aeropro Drive 2013 (grip 3) strung with RPM Blast at 58lb. In february of this year, i buy the new Babolat Pure Aero (grip 2) and strung with Luxilon Alu Power at 54lb. After two hitting sessions, i get tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow and wrist pain so i sold it.
    I start to play again three weeks ago, back with my Aeropro Drive 2013 and no have a problem, but during a match, i break strings and have to change racket and i have to play with Aeropro Drive GT strung with RPM Team at 55lb. After ten minutes, my elbow start to hurt me again so i stoped and resting until i could came back but now i decide to leave babolat and switch racket more arm friendly.

    I was looking for Prince Textreme Tour 100p and Warrior 100, what would you recommend me?

    Also i would like to keep using poly strings but at lower tension.

    thanks!

    • #60697
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Leonardo,
      The Prince Textreme Tour 100p would be a lot more arm friendly than the Aeropro Drive 2013 or the Babolat Pure Aero it is also more arm friendly than the Warrior 100.

    • #60696
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Leonardo,
      The Prince Textreme Tour 100p would be a lot more arm friendly than the Aeropro Drive 2013 or the Babolat Pure Aero it is also more arm friendly than the Warrior 100.

  • #60605

    JP

    Hello Thomas,
    For the past year I´ve been playing with a ProKennex KI15 260 and haven´t been able to get rid of my tennis elbow. Have changed my grip, my posture on both my forehand and backhand and have improved my looking at the ball (not all the times) and my follow through on my swing but still can’t play more than once or twice a week without developing a considerable amount of pain. I have gone to the orthopedist and recommended some serious physical therapy, which I have been doing on a more or less consistent basis. Nevertheless, I bought three of the racquets you mentioned here a year ago and Prince I couldn´t use Yonex is somehow better but Volk seems to make it for me with the addition of some weight on the head. The problem is that I need some adjustment on my swing and get too lazy to do it so I just go back to what works for me, KI15 260. It seems to be my impression but every time I use a 300 grams or over racquet my pain intensifies. All of them with hybrid FXP and 60 lbs of tension. The last addition is a ProKennex KI20, which also seems to be really good with my arm but no real power and lots of balls at the net. I go back to the KI15 but it hurts my arm. I am even developing my left arm to be able to continue my game. As you can see I have a big resolution NOT to let this elbow, epicondylitis define my love for the sport. Hope you have the chance to share your valuable feedback with me. Best always,
    JP

  • #60604
    Profile photo of Gustavo
    Gustavo

    Thomas:

    Thank you very much. Regards. Gustavo.

  • #60598

    Ted Murphy

    I have a damaged elbow from playing with dead strings and hitting with too open a stance on my forehand. It requires surgery to heal and I’m not up to having it. I have changed from a semi-western forehand grip to an Eastern so that I cannot hit the ball as hard. It has helped.

    Here are additional findings: I like denser string patterns (18 x 20) because I can string the racquet looser without losing control. (The dense string bed plays stiffer than an open one and the ball will come in contact with more string to enhance control.) Also, I like thicker strings (15L) to enhance control and durability on loose string jobs.

    Multifilament strings are best – they are softer. Likewise with natural gut. Avoid stiff strings (esp. stiff polyester ones). Experiment with looser strings as they have less vibration and enhance stability.

    Larger head frames are best – they are more forgiving. However, few have dense string patterns. Don’t go too big or you will lose some maneuverability. A larger head will also be more stable and put less pressure on the hand to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand.

    Slightly head heavy frames (1-2 points head heavy) are best because they absorb shock well and slow a player’s swing. The slower the swing, the less shock on the arm/elbow/wrist. A head heavy frame is also more stable. I bought a Head Microgel Oversize and added lead tape at the 3 and 9 o’clock positions of the head to reduce shock. It helped a lot!

    Flexible racquets are best but too flexible ones may have vibration. Always check a frame’s RA (stiffness level) and think twice before buying a frame with a 68 RA measurement or higher. I prefer an RA rating of about 60.

    Standard 27 inch frames are best as they are easier to swing, requiring less effort on the arm. That being said, I have a 27.5″ frame that is oversize and I play well with it. I let the frame do the work and focus on making contact in the sweet spot. It’s important to watch the ball hitting the strings so that it hits the sweet spot more often. The additional length gives me more spin, better reach and more power with less effort. (It’s a slightly head heavy frame.)

    Use as large a grip size as is comfortable – you will not have to squeeze the grip as hard to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand. If you like head light frames, get a heavy one (11 ounces or more) to reduce shock and twisting. I also like a flatter grip shape, e.g., Volkl frames, to enhance stability on my Eastern grip forehand.

    Select a frame with good vibration dampening abilities, e.g., with Textreme (or similar shock decreasing product like Countervail), a built in string vibration dampener in the bridge or large grommets / ports.

    Correct poor technique. Try to use less wrist on your shots; use more shoulder turn instead. Take a lesson if necessary to correct your technique if needed.

    I hope this helps.

  • #60567

    thomas

    Hey Thomas,i am about to take a hard decision these days,i am a big hitter with lots of spin and the couple of years i am playing with the head utek speed mp 300,stifness 60,recently i demo a yonex dr 98 and dr 100 although i really liked it i am not sure if its more arm friendly from my head and beacause i have a sore shoulder and elbow,whats your opinion?

    • #60596
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Thomas,
      The Yonex DR 98 would be better for your arm than the Head YOUTEK IG Speed 300, since it is signficialy more flexible and more head lite balanced, however the Yonex DR 100 would not be better because it is a stiffer frame.

      • #60602

        thomas

        Thomas thanks for your answer,so ai/dr 98 is more arm friendly from my ig speed mp 300,what about compare it to prince tour pro 100 16/19?
        Must make the final decision here!I like them both but i think tour pro is more arm friendly than ai 98,i use cyclone tour 22/23 kg the last months and probably stick with that

        • #60632
          Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
          Thomas Tennis
          Keymaster

          Thomas,
          Both the Yonex AI DR 98 and the Prince Tour 100 are very arm friendly racquets. The only problem with the Prince Tour 100 is that it has been out of production for at least a year so you will not be able to get one that is truely new, the best you will be able to do is get a unused one.

  • #60533

    Jodi Freedman

    Hi Again,

    Just wondering, will you be updating your charts of preferred racquets and strings soon?

    Thanks!

    • #60595
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Jodi,
      There is no specific timetable as to when I update my top 10 list. I do it one at a time depending on when I find something that is better than something else currently on the list

  • #60532

    Jodi Freedman

    Hi,
    So glad you just sent the link for the Wilson Blade 104. I am demo=ing the 98 as well as the 104, and trying to decide. I’m a 3.0-ish club/social player, and have had elbow problems. I felt that the 104 played easier, but the 98 felt better to my arm (although I felt that I had to hit the ball spot-on, really no forgiveness like the 104’s sweet spot.) Both demos had Wilson NXT 17, strung 55 TENSION (RE- MY ARM TROUBLES)

    SO- Any preference between the two? What about string? I previously used the Weiss canon explosive you recommended, and had no problems- although the pro didn’t like stringing it.

    What do you think?
    Thank-you!

    • #60594
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Jodi,
      I think that as a 3.0 club/social player the Wilson Blade 104 is ideal and the Wilson NXT is also a great choice, if you string it at 50 lbs it will be even easier on your arm, and give you some more power although it would be harder to control.

  • #60487
    Profile photo of Gustavo
    Gustavo

    Thomas:

    I´m trying to come back to tennis after a pair of years. Two month ago, after 5 matches I started with tennis elbow. The pain is still there. I was playing with a new wilson blade 104. Do you think this racket could affect my elbow? Is the blade 98 so much better for my elbow? Regards. Gustavo.

    • #60511
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Gustavo,
      I would like to tell you that the Wilson Blade 98 would be much better for you than the Wilson Blade 104 but I am not sure that is true because the Wilson Blade 104 is an arm friendly racquet and is very flexible. If you are playing at a high level against a lot of hard hitters the extra weight in the Wilson Blade 98 would help more.

    • #60510
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Gustavo,
      I would like to tell you that the Wilson Blade 98 would be much better for you than the Wilson Blade 104 but I am not sure that is true because the Wilson Blade 104 is an arm friendly racquet and is very flexible. If you are playing at a high level against a lot of hard hitters the extra weight in the Wilson Blade 98 would help more.

  • #60235

    Katie

    Hi,
    When I started playing tennis 4 years ago, I used the Wilson Juice 108 and developed tennis elbow fairly quickly. I played through the pain and assumed that as my form improved that the pain would go away. However, once I switched to the Wilson Juice Spin all my elbow pain disappeared. Back in March of this year, I switched to the Head Radical MPA and the elbow pain came back. I loved the power and feel of the racquet so I continued to use it. Now the pain is nearly unbearable – although I can still play, it hurts afterwards. After reading your article above, I think the answer is my equipment. Can you suggest a good racquet for me to demo? I usually string my racquets with Wilson Revolve at 55 on the mains and Gamma TNT2 at 58 on the crosses. I am currently using the 16×16 pattern on the Radical. Is there another string combo that you would suggest for power that is arm friendly? Thanks for your help!
    Katie

    • #60293
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Katie,
      I see why you would have had elbow problems with the Wilson Juice 108, this is a very typical racquet for giving users elbow problems, mis-recommended to many beginners having the combination of very high stiffness and lightweight. The Wilson Juice spin is a small step in the right direction since it is a bit heavier and the open spin pattern helps it to play a little more flexible, however I would still give it a low rating. Moving to the Head Radical MPA 16×16 should have helped, but it seems you may need something even more flexible, such as the Yonex EZONE DR98 or possibly the KENNEX QI K TOUR 295 if you are more comfortable with something lighter weight. Also you can try stringer with slightly less tension and changing from the Gamma TNT2 to the Gamma Live Wire

  • #60102

    Mohan

    Hi Thomas,
    I was playing with wilson prostaff 27 LS with natural gut strings . The strings moved SO MUCH that I raised the tension slowly up to 58.
    Now bad tennis elbow. After 2 week break planning to try yonex ezone dr 98 with natural gut at 46 tension. Good idea?

    • #60108
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mohan,
      You can’t get more arm friendly than a Yonex DR 98 Ezone strung with gut at a low tension.

      • #60752

        Mohan

        Coach,
        Thanks a lot. Elbow pain is gone and am playing my 4.0 game again at age 52. Only change I had to do is decrease the tension down to 40lb on my natural gut strings. This racket has more closed pattern when compared to my previous one wilson 97 RF LS. Strings dont move much in my yonex. Thanks once again.

  • #59878
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian T.

    Thomas,
    Thank you for your answer, very useful information, as usual. I decided to buy one racquet between Prince TEXTREME Tour 100P or Wilson Blade 98 18×20(Monfils). I do not have the opportunity to demo them. Which one is easier on the arm and elbow, the most important thing for me? I would like to know your opinion. Thanks and regards. Lucian T.

    • #60050
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucien,
      The Prince Textreme Tour 100 and the Wilson Blade 2015 18×20 are both great tennis racquets. Both very arm friendly with built in anti vibration technology. Both have very arm friendly specs, but if I was to choose based on only which is easier on the elbow I would go with the Prince Textreme Tour 100 only because it is a bit more flexible and more head light

  • #59853

    Pierre

    Hello,
    I have played during >20 years with the Wilson 6.1 and Wilson 95 series and now I guess because of age tennis elbow has become an important issue. I already changed my strings to be more arm friendly however this is not enough. I play 4-5 times a week and the issue is now recurrent. Time for me to use another, more arm friendly, racket than the Wilson 95. I would appreciate any advice you may have in that context. Some say that the Wilson 97S may be a good choice.
    Many thanks,
    Pierre

  • #59998

    danny

    As a Teaching Pro as well as a racquet technician, my level of experience being 30 years, I can attest that the Head Ti Radical OS (Oversize-107 sq in); Andre Agassi racquet cured more arm & shoulder related injuries than I can ever count.

    Strung at the low end of Mfg Rec, 55lbs with “soft” poly/co-poly or multifilament string (Head Rip control was engineered for this racquet) also very important.

    danny

  • #59983

    Carlos Contreras

    Hi, I’m using a Pure Drive (2012) and thinking about the Prince Textreme Warrior 100 (http://www.tennisexpress.com/prince-textreme-warrior-100-tennis-racquet-49128). Can you tell me something about it?

  • #59505
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian T.

    Hello Thomas,
    I have a big issue, please help.
    I am currently playing with a Prince Tour 100 (16×18), strung usually with Wilson NXT at 26. I like a lot how the racquet is playing and is really soft on my arm. The only issue is that due to the open pattern of the racquet, the strings are moving towards all sides and I always have to re-arrange them every time after couple of points. What type of string do you suggest me to use? I am sceptical about stringing with polys. What do you say?
    Second, do you think with Prince Tour 100p will I have the same issues?
    Thank you for your help and advice.
    Lucian

    • #59814
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucien the Prince the more open the string pattern the more the strings will move in general, but the open string pattern helps the racquet play more flexible and also makes it easier to generate spin.

    • #59813
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucien the Prince the more open the string pattern the more the strings will move in general, but the open string pattern helps the racquet play more flexible and also makes it easier to generate spin.

  • #59462

    Fabiao

    Thomas simple question is the Prince Tour 100 Pro under your list? There are some general missleading notes on the forum, the name of the racket is on the list but the link take us to a Prince Tour 16×20 or something. Did you experience the 100 Pro ever? Cheers.

    • #59477
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Fabio,
      The Prince Tour Pro 100 seems to be the older version of the PRINCE Tour 100 16X18 the specs are almost identical. I removed the word Pro from the one listed on my top 10 list to help avoid confusion.

    • #59476
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Fabio,
      The Prince Tour Pro 100 seems to be the older version of the PRINCE Tour 100 16X18 the specs are almost identical. I removed the word Pro from the one listed on my top 10 list to help avoid confusion.

  • #59348

    Chris Campbell

    Thomas
    I am nearing the end of a particularly nasty bout of TE. 49 years old and never had TE, despite lengthy junior career and playing in college. I developed TE when I came back too fast. I am currently playing with a BLX Blade 98 strung at 48# with Gamma LiveWire XP. I can play, but with a brace, after a dormant three month hiatus to heal. I am currently demoing racquets. Specifically, I would like your opinion on the following as to their arm friendliness;
    DR98 and 100, Blade98 18×20, TT95, Volkl SG10 320,, Wilson Ultra 97, and Volkl SG8 315.
    Thanks,
    Chris

    • #59460
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Chris,
      Out of the racquets you mentioned I really like the Wilson Ultra 97, the Wilson Blade 98 and the Yonex Dr 98.
      Tom

  • #59333
    Profile photo of James
    James

    Dear Thomas, thanks for running this great site. I’m a 5.0 aggressive baseliner and elbow issues for a few years. I had the aero pro drive but I switched to the Head IG Radical Pro (pre Grahphen) as it is much more flexible. That was an improvement but elbow issues returning lately. Too bad cause I like the feel of the racquet.
    I tried the Head GrapheneXT prestige MP you recommend. I liked it, too soon to tell about the elbow. I’m surprised you recommend it as as per tennis warehouse it’s a bit stiffer and lighter than my radical pro, but I guess it is more head light.
    I like heavy racquets so I was thinking of buying the ProKennex Ionix Ki5 PSE which gets great reviews for being arm friendly, though very heavy. I cannot play test it where I live so it’s a roll of the dice.
    I’m thinking posted stiffness ratings are a bit suspect. I have focused on stiffness when screening racquets but I now suspect elbow friendliness is a combination of all the specs. Thoughts or recommendations for me?

    • #59341
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      James,
      I agree that elbow friendliness is a combination of all racquet specs and that flex ratings are suspect as different resellers and manufactures often indicate different flex ratings. I am not sure I would buy The Pro Kennex Ionic Ki5 PSE if you cannot at least try it as it will take time to get used to the weight difference. You might want to try the Pro Kennex Kinetic KI Q Tour at 12.2 oz strung

  • #59303

    James

    Hi Thomas. Thanks for your wonderful website. suffering from both golfer’s and tennis elbow for a decade, I am shocked that I didn’t have any knowledge of racquets having this much impact on the condition. Thanks a lot.
    I have a question before I make a decision. I noticed there are many different Prince Tour versions besides the one you had on your list. Prince Tour Pro 100 ESP is a bit stiffer and bigger in frame size than Tour 100 16×18. But it’s 60$ cheaper than Tour 100 16×18. I wonder what your opinion would be on the Prince Tour Pro 100 ESP in comparison to Tour 100.

    • #59306
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      James,
      The Prince Tour Pro 100 ESP and the Prince Tour 100 are both great arm friendly racquet. The 100 ESP is not as flexible although it is still a flexible racquet but the open string pattern makes it play more flexible and also makes it easier to create spin. The 100 ESP will take some getting used to as it has a very unique feel. One downside of the 100 ESP is that the strings will break very easily unless you use the Prince tour which is a pretty stiff string and not very arm friendly.

  • #59160

    Gabriele

    Hi Thomas,
    for many years I played with a Babolat Pure Drive (I like the feel and the way it plays) but now I’m looking to something more soft for my arm.
    My list of potential buy are: Volkl super G V1 PRO, Wilson Blade 98 (18×20 or 16×19), Prince Tour 100P, Yonex DR 98. I also tried the Head graphene XT prestige MP but it’s a little to heavy.
    What would be your preferred order with the racquets above?
    Thank you very much.
    Gabriele

    • #59216
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Gabriele,
      All of the racquets you are considering are far more arm friendly than the Babolat Pure Drive, a racquet that has caused a lot of people arm problems. I especially like the Prince 100P and the Yonex Ezone Dr 98 since both are very flexible, my favorite may be the Yonex DR 98 since it has a more open string pattern and it has added anti vibration technology to its grip and frame.
      Tom

  • #58933

    Mike M.

    Thomas, I see you added the Prince Textreme 100P to the list. Can you comment on the new Prince Textreme Warrior 100? Specs look very similar except that the stiffness is a few points higher. Would it be considered arm friendly? Thank you for all you do.

    • #58967
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mike,
      The is only slightly above average in terms of its being arm friendly, although it has a head light balance and is reasonably heavy its flex is about average, while the Prince Textreme 100P is much more flexible and slightly heavier

  • #57664

    Meghan

    Hi there Thomas,
    Thank-you for your list! Do you have an updated one for 2015/16?
    Thanks again!
    Meghan

  • #58752

    Cam

    Hey
    I am in the market for a new racquet, wish to stay with Head as my brand. I have been looking at the newest Prestige. The Graphene XT MidPlus version. I noticed the old prestige youtek version is on your list.
    Was wondering what your take on this newest model for TE would be.
    I always use a multi string (hate polys).
    Thanks 🙂

    • #58833
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Cam,
      Thanks for bringing this to our attention. The Graphene XT MP is almost identical to the old prestige youtek which has been updated to the Head GrapheneXT Prestige Pro. The Graphene XT MP uses the same technology but is a very minor improvement as far as its arm friendly specs – it is slightly more head light in balance and slightly more flexible. I am going to update from the old prestige youtek which has been discontinued.

  • #58321

    Mark

    I’m looking to get a wilson pro staff 95S. I have trialed both the 2014 and 2015 model. Which in your opinion do you find to be the more arm friendly racket? Do you know the if there is a difference in flex, weight, etc. between the two? Thanks.

  • #57772

    Owen

    Hello, what’s your take on the new Yonex EZoneDR98, successor of the Ai98?
    Cheers, Owen

    • #58143
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Owen,
      I really like the YONEX EZONE DR 98 It is very similar to the YONEX EZONE Ai 98, but it is even more flexible due to its Nanometric DR material which provides more flexibility and resilience to the frame. It also incorporates the same Dual Shut System that reduces shock by 50% over traditional frames.

  • #57446

    sal Agati

    Hey Thomas
    My wife is a relatively new player. But she is progressing nicely and has become a more aggressive intermediate player. But she has really started to experience some real debilitating tennis elbow. She purchased a Volkl racquet and it has not helped at all with the pain. I saw your note above on the Babolat Storm. Would this be a good choice for her? And what string and tension would you recommend?
    best
    Sal

  • #56370

    Gerald

    Hi Thomas

    I am a good player and a hard hitter. I have 6 babolat pure aero racquets. I use rpm blast 18 gauge strung at 52 pounds. I had a long break from tennis for years and started playing a few months ago. If been playing well and about 5 times a week. I do not have any elbow issues but the back of my arm and shoulder are sore. I’ve taken a break for a bit and have ordered gut for mains and volkl for crosses.
    Then I’ll do some testing. Do I need to change racquets or should I try strings first ? If I change racquets what do I change to ?

    • #56459
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Gerald,
      The string change might help some but you are already stringing at a low tension and you are using a racquet that has received an awful lot of complaints about causing arm problems, so the racquet is your main problem. If you really want to eliminate problems it would be more beneficial for you to try some more flexible frames and get used to the feel, as a power hitter you will benefit from the control and feel of any of the racquets in my top 10 list http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets/

  • #56289
    Profile photo of gatorgville
    richard

    Trying to get rid of tennis elbow, I tried out some volkl racquets. I just got a volkl organix superg8 315g.
    It is 100 head size, 11.6 weight, 27 inch, but it has a stiffer head, I think 70 or 72.
    Am I wasting my time trying to cure elbow problems with this extra stiffness?
    so far, no taking a day off between playing, I am still getting sore at end of game.
    I didn’t think I could handle the weight, and if necessary, I realize there are other racquets out there.

  • #56292
    Profile photo of gatorgville
    richard

    It is so hard to try out demo racquets and get a good idea of what you like, because of the different string tensions which feel uncomfortable upon trial.
    Am I to assume all the racquets which meet your specifications list, are in the elbow friendly category? Because I have only been trying out the volkl and prokennex.

    • #56453
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Richard,

      I agree that demo racquets feel a little different because a lot of times the strings are not the best and by the time you use them they often have lost a lot of their tension. All I can say is try to demo from a reputable company and try to find out the tension and strings in advance.
      My list includes what I think are the 10 most arm friendly racquets currently on the market. In addition there are many other good arm friendly Pro Kennex and Volkl racquets some of which have been reviewed on this website also all the racquets on the top 10 list have been reviewed.

  • #56290
    Profile photo of gatorgville
    richard

    What is your opinion of the volka v1pro racquet. They recently came out with another model called the v1pro g model. 99.5, 11.3 strung, and a little more flex, more head light than before, etc. Is it in a good elbow friendly category?

    • #56452
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Richard,
      I do not like the Volkl V1 Pro, it is definitely too stiff. However the VOLKL Super G V1 Pro is a flexible racquet and more head light and I would consider this an arm friendly racquet.

  • #56051
    Profile photo of darios
    dario

    First of all congratulations for your website, I find it really usefull.

    I am a 48 man who’s got back into tennis after many years.
    I’ve recently developed some hand pain.

    I play an “old school” tennis: serve and volley, no rotation,
    one-handed backhand. I prefer more control than power.

    Which racket in your list could be the best choise for me?

    Thank you in advance.

    • #56451
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Dario,
      I do not know of any racquet that is particularly better for hand issues as opposed to any other arm issues. But my top 10 list has http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets/ among the most arm friendly racquets out of hundreds of racquets so I would suggest you try out a few of those and see which you like best. Good luck!

  • #55407

    Alex

    I suffer from tennis elbow and really appreciate your site. I would like to purchase a recent design Head or Babolat in the range of $100 to $200 and have not seen a 2015 racquet on your list. Can you give me a review on one of the new latest and greatest in terms of material and construction from one of the aforementioned manufacturers. Thanking you in anticipation-Alex

    • #55556
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Alex,
      I have new reviews coming out all the time. If you want to be alerted join the mailing list. My top 10 list always has the best or at least very close to the best arm friendly racquets, I would not get too hung up on Brands Wilson, Head etc or the latest or newest technology the best arm friendly racquet might not be the newest racquet or come from the most popular manufacturer,

  • #54420

    Hi Thomas, so glad I found your website with excellent info. I was playing with the AeroPro drive for years until my TE flared up recently when I increased my play from once weekly/ biweekly to 3 times a week. I continue to sample racquets on your list. I’m also getting a Wilson Pro Staff 97 but am confused because the stiffness varies from different websites. Wilson does not list stiffness on their site, but I found it as 62 on one site, but 66 on a couple of other site. This Pro Staff 97 is not on your list, what is your view of this racquet in terms of elbow friendliness? Thank you.

    • #54833
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      George,
      I am not surprised that you have developed elbow problems after using the Babolat Aeropro Drive as that is one of the least arm friendly racquets on the market and I have seen a tremendous amount of complaints from people who have developed arm problems using that raquet. The Wilson Pro Staff 97 is a huge improvement. As far as the RA flex rating for that racquet it is difficult to say when you see variations from different resellers, although manufactures test there racquets unstrung and most resellers test them strung so I would hesitate to say the Wilson Pro Staff 97 is a top arm friendly racquet when I see a 66 Ra unless you can confirm that measurement was taken on a unstrung racquet.

  • #54604
    Profile photo of Clay Jones
    Clay

    Thanks Thomas. We conducted demos with three on ur top 10. We tried the Head, Yonex, and Technifibre. All three seemed to work well and help but she settled on the Technifibre. I have also ordered some NRG string on ur list. So far – after 4 hits with demos she doesn’t have any more pain. I appreciate ur site and help. He new racquets come in Wednesday. What a great service! Cheers.

  • #54299
    Profile photo of Clay Jones
    Clay

    Thomas – my 16 year old daughter has been having tremendous shoulder pain. She uses the Head Grapine Speed Pro (Djokovich racquet). She quits hitting and goes to rehab and her shoulder will feel good but once she starts hitting again by the third day it hurts again. I found ur site and am intrigued. Do u think one of ur top 10 would be a good move for her? I noticed her racquet has a 68 flex which I am sure is not helping her shoulder. Thanks for ur site and help.

    • #54588
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Clay,
      The stiffness of your daughter’s current racquet is definitely hurting her. You should look into switching to something on the top 10 list. Even switching to the HEAD YT Graphene Prestige Pro would be helpful.

  • #53323
    Profile photo of Tharcisio48
    Tharcisio

    Hi,

    I’m using currently a ProKennex Type C Redondo Edition 93. What do you say about this racquet?

  • #51997
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Dear Thomas,
    I have just demoed the Prince Tour 100 16×18(David Ferrer’s choice) and have to say it is a great racquet and flexible. I am surprised this racquet is not on your top 10 list of best arm friendly racquets that play well. Do you consider it too light to be a top arm friendly racquet or does not play so well overall?
    I would appreciate your opinion. Great site overall, thank you!

  • #51153

    Rafal

    It has been a while since the last post, but I find this website extremely useful. Just to add – I have had a very good experience with ProKennex Redondo racquets, which never caused any problems or pain to my arm. After testing variety of options, it is now my racquet of choice.

  • #51040
    Profile photo of Tom Palmer
    Tom Palmer

    Have you reviewed the new diadem strings. Their specs indicate co-poly but claim softness. I am currently using two of your recommended strings but really would like an increase in power.

  • #50869

    Michael

    Hi Thomas,

    Having suffered from TE recently, I have learned a lot about arm friendly rackets from browsing through your website which is excellent – thanks.

    After reading reviews, I am considering buying the new 2015 Wilson Pro Staff 97. Looking through through the specs of the racket, it seems to meet the requirements of an arm friendly racket but I am a little unsure if this is the case.

    Can you tell me if my thinking is on the right track?

    Thanks,

    Michael.

    • #50897
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Michael,
      The Wilson Pro Staff 97 is a very arm friendly racquet it is heavy enough, has a very head light balance is quite flexible and also has an open string pattern. If you like the feel of this racquet I would recommend it.

      • #50948

        Michael

        Thanks Thomas, your response is appreciated.

        Wilson have also brought out a new Pro Staff 97S with exactly the same specs as the 97 but with a more open string pattern for spin which also might be worth considering.

        Michael.

        • #50964
          Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
          Thomas Tennis
          Keymaster

          Michael,
          Wilson the does not have a 97S but they carry the 97LS which is considerably lighter but the 95S has nearly the identical spec’s but has a slightly smaller head. The open string pattern is more arm friendly because it plays like a more flexible racquet.

  • #50680
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Dear Thomas,
    Also, considering Prince Tour 95, Prince Tour Pro 98 and Prince Tour 100 16×18, which one would you consider to be the most arm-friendly?
    I would appreciate your opinion.
    Thank you.
    Lucian

    • #50856
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucian,
      You really did your homework all 3 are great choices I would say the Prince Tour 100 16 x 18 might slightly bet out the Prince Tour Pro 98 since it has a slightly more open string pattern but these are very similar so it really would be a personal choice to see which feels better to you. Also the Prince Tour 95 is a great arm friendly racquet but it might feel a bit heavy for some players but if you like the feel I would recommend it.

  • #50740

    cem

    Hi Thomas,

    Great site, great info.

    Wilson Pro staff 95S is a bit heavier for me. So I decided to choose Prostaff 100LS. But Io hesitate because of tennis elbow. Can I think that 100 LS is arm friendly? Thank you in advance for your answer.

    • #50855
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      cem,

      The Wilson Pro Staff is not as arm friendly as the Wilson Pro Staff 95s, but it still is relatively flexible with a head lite balance the only negative is its lightweight so I would still give it an above average arm friendly rating. The lightweight is less of a problem if you are a beginner or possibly an intermediate but for an advanced player who faces some big hitters this racquet would put some strain on your arm because it would not have the stability to stand up to some big shots.

  • #50693

    Mark

    Mike,
    I currently have Gamma Glide 16 in the crosses at 57 lbs and Gamma Moto 17 in the mains at 54 lbs. I’m about to get a stringing machine so I can experiment. I’d like to try NRG2 in the crosses and a few shaped strings in the mains.

  • #50615
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Hi Thomas,
    I would like to know your opinion about Prince Tour 95 and Prince Textreme Tour 95. Thank you.

  • #50593

    Mike M

    Tom, really appreciate your website and all you do. I wanted to weigh in with my story and what has worked for me with help from this site.
    I was using a Prince DB 26 Mid Plus from the early 90’s. I wanted to upgrade to something newer and more arm friendly. I have had tennis elbow for years(over 10) located in more of the underside of the elbow.(golfers elbow?)
    I wanted something to play with that would be somewhat similiar to what I had but provide the relief I was looking for. I tried The Pro Kenex and a few of the Prince frames on your list. When the Prince Tour 100 16 x 18 came out, It looked like a good possibility. I tried the demo and along with it the Tour 100 18 x 20 and the Prince Warrior 100 as well.

    The feel of the Tour 100 16 x 18 was plush and soft as advertised. I have always liked a flexible feel and this was great. It quickly stood out from the others. When I got the racquet, the feel was not the same as the demo. It took numerous string types to get the feel I was looking for. I ruled out any poly string because of arm concerns. I settled on Head “Intellitour” 16G strings at 50 Lbs. I have used this for the last 6 months.
    To date, no arm problem. None! It took a few weeks to begin to dissipate but little by little it got better. The other thing I did was to abandon my one hand backhand and swith to a two hander. I believe some of the problem was related to off center hits off that side. I also spent some time on changing my 70’s forehand to a more modern swing which has really improved my overall game.
    Bottom line is your information is accurate and appreciated! When I found this site, I was considering giving up tennis. Just didnt seem viable going forward. I would reccommend this racquet to anyone who likes a flexible soft feel, great control and adaquate power in an arm friendly stick.

    Regards,

    Mike M Lake Mary, FL 4.0 player

  • #50475
    Profile photo of Shula
    Shula
    Participant

    Hi Tom:
    Thank you for your response. The Yonex vcore 97 310g that I have been demoing is actually 10.9. My other vcore 97 was 11.6ozs. I am very torn between the Ai 98 and the lighter vcore 97.
    Thanks again for your next response.
    Shula

  • #50403
    Profile photo of Shula
    Shula
    Participant

    Hi Thomas:
    I have been playing with the Yonex pro tour 97, 330g. I am try I got to move to a lighter racket. I had tennis elbow many years ago, was told that a heavier racket would be better for me. I have tried the following demos:
    Yonex Ai 98, and the lighter, 310g Yonex pro tour 97. I liked both rackets. I also tried the new Technifibre flight, 300g.

    What are your thoughts? Should I switch to the 98, or stay with the lighter version of th 97. How does the Technifibre compare?

    Thanks
    Shula

    • #50433
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Shula,
      Out of the racquets you mention your best bet is the Yonex Ai 98 the Yonex pro tour 97 is actually 12.2 oz or about 345g plus it is slightly stiffer. The Technifibre flight 300 is pretty stiff maybe you should consider the TECNIFIBRE 2013 Tfight 315

  • #50155

    Rowland

    Hello, Is the the racket I am playing with ok? It’s the old Head Genesis 660 (specs here: http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/head-genesis-660-midplus-102-mp-110402404). Thanks.

  • #50152

    Haroldo Bukman

    Hi Thomas,

    Nowadays I´m playing with one Prokennex 15g light.
    My problems with tennis elbow desappeared.
    In the past I was playing with Yonex RD TI 70 long. Old model.
    What do you think about this Yonex model related to tennis elbow problems?

    Thanks,

    Haroldo

  • #50146

    mike

    Thomas,
    What are your thoughts on the WILSON Five 103 BLX Tennis Racquet? The new damping system seems to reduce vibration.

    • #50161
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mike,
      The Wilson Five 103 BLX is very unique because it has some characteristics that are typically very bad for your arm such as being very lightweight and head heavy, but that is counteracted with its extremely high flex, the most flexible racquet I’ve ever seen plus it has the added technology for vibration dampening. I definitely would not recommend this racquet to an advanced level player since its extreme lightweight would make it very unstable if you are playing a powerful opponent. As far as how good this racquet is for your arm the jury is out and time will tell. So you would be taking a bit of a risk with this but if you love the lightweight maybe its worth it for you.

      • #50186

        mike

        Thomas thank you for the advise. I am a 3.5 player with a medium to slow swing. My elbow is in bad shape. Currently use the Volki V1 MP. Any suggestion on a racket and string?

  • #49791
    Profile photo of stephanie
    Stephanie

    Hi! I just started tennis last August. I am a petite 5 feet lady. I am currently recovering from a bad tennis elbow & am looking for a new tennis racket for when i am ready to play again. Right now, I have the Head Instinct S. I just re-strung with NXT 17. I am leaning towards Ferrer’s Prince Tour 100 (16×18). What do you think? Appreciate any input. Thanks!

    • #49900
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Stephanie,

      I can see how you had problems using the Head Instinct S that racquet is awful for tennis elbow. The Prince Tour 100 (16×18) is a very arm friendly racquet and would be a huge improvement. I would try it to see if you can get used to the heavier weight I few other arm friendly racquets that are a bit lighter are the Wilson Blade 104 and the Prince Textreme Tour 100T

  • #49647
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Thomas,
    I will demo the Yonex Ezone AI 98 this week for couple of days. What type of string do you recommend to use considering I have this option? Thank you alot.

    • #49891
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucien,
      I don’t have a particular string to recommend for that racquet but I certainly would refer you to

      Tennis Strings

  • #49637

    Chris

    Hi Thomas,

    Whats your opinion on the Babolat Pure Drive FO Edition and BABOLAT Pure Control 95 GT racquet? Are they arm friendly?

  • #49351
    Profile photo of georgem
    georgem
    Participant

    Appreciate your blog here very much. Thank you for the helpful information.

    I have a babolat pure control tour. The racket stiffness is 63. Can you give me your opinion of this racquet? Also, what about vibration dampners…….would a really good one also help?

    Thanks again!

    • #49590
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Georgem
      The Babolat Pure Control is definatly my favorite Babolat racquet since it is a continuation of the Babolat Pure Storm the only Babolat racquet to ever make my top 10 list. The Babolat Pure Control has not made my top 10 list mainly because I cannot get a clear picture of its flex rating since whenever I try to find its flex rating it is different on ever website including Babolats website which rates it as a very stiff racquet.

      • #49627
        Profile photo of georgem
        georgem
        Participant

        Thanks Tom for your comments on the Babolat Pure Control Tour. What you found is exactly what I found….there isn’t any consistency on the flex rating. I found several different ratings which I find rather bizarre. I may have the guys at PGA store measure it. They said they would when I was last in there and I’ll let you know.

        Oh, does a good vibration dampner help? I bought a $7 high quality vibration dampner and I’m hoping that will help reduce the vibration and shock to my elbow. Any opinion on vibration dampners? Thanks!

  • #49219
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Dear Thomas,
    I would like to know your opinion about Yonex Ezone AI 98 compared to Prince EXO3 Rebel 95 and Prince Tour 98 ESP. I have the two Princes, but just played with the Yonex and enjoyed very much.
    I am thinking about buying one, what do you think about the Yonex? Thank you for your always useful opinions.

  • #49162

    Zhafran

    Zhafran,
    I would go with the Prince Tour 100 since overall Prince tends to make a lot more arm friendly racquets and Babolats racquets tend to be bad for your arm with a few exceptions. I would have to say the RA of the Babolat Pure Storm is probably somewhere in between 59 and 67 since the Babolat website seems to list all there RA’s higher than any other website which is another reason I would be uncomfortable with their racquets and probably would not want to purchase one without getting it tested.

  • #49112
    Profile photo of Nigel
    Nigel
    Participant

    Since both are on your top ten, how would you rank the Wilson Pro Staff 95s against the Prince Tour Pro 98. I am a 3.5 player (don’t think I am going to change my game much which is not really a power game), been playing for over 40 years but lately with wrist and tennis elbow problems.

    • #49237
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Nigel,
      I rank both the Wilson Pro Staff 95S and the Prince Tour Pro 98 as 5 star arm friendly racquets

  • #49109

    Mark

    Thomas,
    I currently play with a Head Graphene Radical Midplus that I have added lead inside the grip to get the total to 11.7 oz. It’s mostly ok, but I have been getting some elbow twinges when serving. Would you recommend a switch? I am considering demoing the ProKennex Q5 315, but the specs seem outside your recommendations. Does the PK tech make that ok?
    Thanks,
    -Mark

    • #49238
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mark,
      The Pro Kennex Q5 has a lot of positive feedback for helping tennis elbow sufferers but I agree it is stiffer than what I normally recommend but I would highly recommend the Pro Kennex Kinetic KI5 315
      http://tenniselbowracquet.com/kennex-kinetic-ki5

      • #50353

        Mark

        Thomas,
        Thanks for your recent advice. I switched from my Head Radical MP to the Pro Kennex Ki5 2 weeks ago. Today, my tennis elbow seems to be gone. I was honestly skeptical about whether or not changing my racquet would make a difference, but it sure did!

        I also took a lesson to ask if I was doing something wrong with my serve, and we corrected an issue with serving too upward leading to a slight hyper extension of the elbow. That mixed with noticeably less vibration transfer from the racquet on all shots has made a huge difference. An added benefit is I’m no longer afraid to go after the ball because I don hurt now, and I’m playing noticeably better.

        I did compare to the Pro Kennex Q5 and I noticed a significant difference between the two, with the Q5 feeling less comfortable to me. Presumably because it is stiffer. But for me, the Technifibre on the top ten list didn’t feel as comfortable to me either. I was waiting to try the Yonex, but the Ki5 felt so good I cancelled the Yonex demo order and bought the Ki5.

        Thanks and keep up the good work of helping people!

        -Mark

        • #50424

          mike

          Mark what type of string did you use and string tension?

  • #48900
    Profile photo of vprieto
    Victor Prieto

    I have a Head Radical Mid Plus Microgel racquet that I bought some times ago because I read somewhere that were elbow friendly, which it did, however I would like to move forward a more new Head racquet as friendly as mine. Could you give me some advice please
    Thank you
    Victor

    • #48946
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Victor,
      The HEAD MicroGel Radical MP is a good arm friendly racquet with a head light balance and a very flexible frame it is a bit light for a very arm friendly racquet which is why I recommended in the past for players looking for an arm friendly racquet but could not get comfortable with a heavier racquet. One of my favorite Head racquets is the HEAD YT Graphene Prestige Pro http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquet-reviews/head/head-yt-graphene-prestige-pro/ which is in my current top 10 list.

  • #48861

    Odia

    Do you by any chance know the RA of the aluminum racket winfield F14. It is pretty heavy. If it has a decent RA it should qualify as an arm-friendly racket. Thanks!

    • #48948
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Odia,
      This racquet is definitely much heavier than the typical racquet on todays market which is a plus. The racquet is probably arm friendly but I cannot find information on its RA rating

  • #48858

    Grace

    Hi ! Is the Wilson blade 98s (spin) a good tennis elbow friendly Racquet ?

  • #48491

    Kevin

    Hello Tom,
    I’m a hobby player looking for a racket with good top-spin, power and a large sweet point to replace my Prince EXO3 Premier 105 ESP. Due to a lot of string movement, I upped the tension but I’m then lacking spin, despite the 14 x 16 string pattern. I play mostly from the baseline with a middle length swing.
    Which racket would you recommend? I was thinking of “HEAD GRAPHENE XT SPEED MP” or “Wilson Burn 100S”

    • #48719
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Kevin,
      I would not recommend any of those racquets as arm friendly racquets they are all relatively stiff especially the Wilson Burn, the Prince EXO3 Premier ESP is also has a head heavy balance. If you are looking for racquets with great spin potential that are also very arm friendly I recommend the Prince Tour 100 ESP, the Prince Tour 98 ESP or the Wilson Pro Staff 95S

  • #48299
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian T.

    Hello Thomas,
    I bought a Prince Tour 98 ESP(incredible racquet!!!) three months ago and played usually twice a week, using first a Prince Premier 15L Touch strings(strung at 24), and the racquet had huge string movement after every point, but felt comfortable and played great. After 20 hours of playing, I switched to Prince Tour XC 15L strings(strung at 24), who had less power, harder to play, felt less comfortable, but no string movement at all. Now I am considering changing the strings again. On the Prince website and also on the racquet written, considering the Prince Tour 98 ESP specs, is recommended to use Prince Tour strings, 1.35+ strings(15L gauge). I like the way Prince Premier played, but the strings had huge movement, what kind of strings do you recommend, to have comfortable elbow playing? Do you think I could have problems using for a long time the Prince Tour 15L strings? I like very much the racquet and want to find the proper strings for it. Need your advice, thank you very much. Lucian.

    • #48397
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucien,
      The Prince Tour XC Control 15L works great with the Prince Tour ESP 100. I would not worry about arm problems with this racquet but if you ever have a problem you can switch to a softer string but be ready to possibly be breaking strings frequently

  • #48150

    F/Tennis

    Thank you very much Thomas, this is always my thinking, love the POG OS and very hard to switch from…I think is unique and still compete with the new racquets, just that sometimes younger players hit the ball so strong that I wonder if could help another new frame….but well just a matter of my arm and not the frame 🙂 and finding the right strings

  • #47704

    F/Tennis

    Hello Thomas,

    I’ve been long time playing with the POG oversize, I love the racquet though sometimes wonder if could replace by another modern racquet. Do you consider POG oversize a high arm friendly racquet? Which modern racquet do you think I could try if want to switch from it?

    Thank you very much,

    • #47909
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      FTennis,
      It is hard to find such a unique combination of weight, flexibility and large head size that the POG oversize provides. In fact I cannot find any current racquets. Another similar racquet is the HEAD Radical OS Limited Edition but that is unfortunately also unavailable.

  • #47498

    Ginny

    Thanks.. if I wanted to consider any of the Babolat racquets, which one would you consider to be the “most” arm friendly of all of them?? I like the way they play, however I am worried about my arm obviously. Trying to find the best alternative.

  • #47558
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Ginny,
    There are a lot of brands outside of Babolat and they tend to not have arm friendly racquets. If I had to pick there most arm friendly racquet I would go with the Pure Control 95 + as it is one of their more flexible frames it has good mass and it has a very head light balance

  • #47448

    Ginny

    Hello, I noticed you took the Babolat Pure Strike off… however I would like to demo it. Which one did you like the 16×19 or the 18×20? Want to make sure I try the correct one. And what about it made you take it off the list?

    • #47467
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Ginny,
      I had the Babolat Pure Storm on my top 10 list a while back, but never Pure Storm I do not consider the Babolat Pure Storm an arm friendly racquet.

  • #47153

    Chris

    Hi,

    Could you recommend me the best racquet for topspin controlled shots? I have mild tennis elbow issues too. Thanks

    • #47200
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Chris,
      I really like the PRINCE Tour Pro 100 ESP. It takes some time to get used to and the strings break quickly unless you use the prince tour extra control string. But once you get used to it the feel is great and it generates a lot of extra spin.

  • #47021

    Joe

    Hi Thomas,

    I am trying out new racquets as well.
    I have tried the head extreme pro, I felt very comfortable, however, i am surprised to see the flex is 69, but I didn’t felt this racquet was too stiff. Any comment. I am a bit hesitate to buy this one because I am afraid the high RA number will give me trouble.

    • #47031
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Joe,
      Your concern regarding the Head Extreme Pro is legitimate, that racquet is too stiff and I even know some people who have tennis elbow after using it. Have you tried the HEAD YT Graphene Prestige Pro that racquet is a lot more arm friendly

      • #47053

        Joe

        Hi Tom,

        Thank you for the quick reply. What do you think of the Head Graphene Radical Midplus, and the Head LTD Graphene Radical Midplus. Thanks.

        • #47076
          Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
          Thomas Tennis
          Keymaster

          Joe,
          The Head Graphene Radical Midplus, and the Head LTD Graphene Radical Midplus are very similar to each other. They are an improvement over the Head Pro Extreme since they are significantly more flexible but not much better overall since they are lighter and have a more head heavy balance.

  • #46625

    JR

    Hey there. Thanks for making this list. Question about the 2015 blade 98. What makes this arm friendly with a RA of 64 and only being 3 points HL? Just curious, because I absolutely loved demoing this frame but am concerned about my injury-prone arm/shoulder.

    • #46973
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      JR,
      The Wilson Blade is a very arm friendly racquet with good specs Tennis Express lists the RA at 63 and a HL balance at -6 but regardless the specs are still good plus it comes with excellent anti vibration technology. If you are still concerned you should try some of the really flexible arm friendly racquets like the PRINCE Tour Pro 100 Tennis Racquet

  • #46814

    Grace

    Curious what you think about the Wilson blade 104? Is that a decent choice for tennis elbow sufferers ? I am a female 4.0 player.

    • #46949
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Grace,
      The Wilson Blade 104 is decent for tennis elbow sufferers, it is very flexible with a head light balance and good anti vibration technology, it is a bit light to be a top arm friendly racquet but might be the best choice for some who cannot get comfortable with a heavier racquet.

  • #46759

    Jo

    I used a + for a year, liked the power, but had elbow pain. For the last year I have used Wilson Juice 108, no elbow pain, but would like a little more power. Tried to the Volkl Organix 3 yesterday, loved the power and large head size–but woke up with elbow pain.
    Is there a racquet that is similar to the Wilson Juice 108, but with a little more powerful and larger head size?

    • #46947
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Jo,
      The Babolat Pure Drive has been notorious for elbow pain complaints and is one of the worst racquets you can use for your arm, the Volkl Organix 3 is also very light and stiff and bad for your arm , The Wilson Juice 108 also is not an arm friendly racquet but if for whatever reason it has not been causing you problems maybe you should think about staying with it as the arm friendly racquets are not known for power but the could be more powerful; with a low tension elastic string

  • #46234

    Dajubo

    Hallo Thomas, hallo everybody,
    3 weeks ago I bought new racket – Dunlop 200 lite – after discuss it here with Thomas.

    Specs:
    RA: 63 (or less), 16×19, Balance: 320, Strung weight: 327g, Head: 95 sqinch. It is an older model, so maybe you can not buy the racket anymore and the other dunlop rackets in this Biomimetic serie are lighter and with higher RA stifteness (I didn’t understand it???).
    After 3 weeks I must say and I am very happy and my tennis elbow is much better, sometimes I think almost gone … I am immediate player and playing with 95 sqinch is not so difficult as I thought.
    It is completely different feeling with this racket:
    – volley is much easier for me, because the manoeuvrability is better
    – you must touch the ball in the right middle, but if I do (91 % success) then your shot is stronger (maybe you need more concentration for it, but it is good for your play)
    – service is much easier, I think because of the balance.
    – racket feels much lighter dan my old “light” racket
    – you must do long swings, but that is absolutely better for your arm

    I LOVE THE RACKET. THANK YOU THOMAS !

    P.S. Maybe I should buy overgrip or leather grip for grip-size 2, then before I’ve used grip-size 3

  • #45081

    Dajubo

    Thomas,
    thanks a lot for your quick answer. I wil try Dunlop 200 Lite, could not wait – also because it should be the first time I should play with 95 square inch head.
    Regards,
    Dajubo

  • #45052

    Dajubo

    Hello Thomas,
    very interesting site, thank you. I am an advanced player (45, woman) and have lot of fun with tennis. Unfortunately if I play longer and dedicate I get elbow pain.
    At this moment I play with Dunlop Biomimetic M 5.0. Looking at the specs it is not very flexible frame. I think about it to change my racket.
    At this moment (I live in the Netherlands) I have the possibility to buy a new racket (old model): Dunlop 200 Lite or Dunlop 200 plus.
    Would you recommend this rackets, if I look a the specs it looks good?

    Thanks a lot for your advice.
    Regard Dajubo

    • #45066
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Dajubo,
      You are right about the DUNLOP Biomimetic M 5.0 Tennis Racquet, it is quite light and also very stiff, if you have arm problems and that racquet could definitely be contributing to it. Both the Dunlop 200 Lite or Dunlop 200 plus are much lighter and more flexible especially the Dunlop 200 Lite which is very flexible and despite its name is not light

  • #44983

    Cam

    Hey I was wondering what’s more important?
    flex or weight When it comes to TE and a racquet?
    also wondering your thoughts on the Head flexpoint 1 (the blue one)

    • #45064
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Hi Cam,
      T me the most important factor for preventing tennis elbow is to get a racquet with a lower flex rating. Weight is also very important but there are some exceptions where it would be alright to go with a slightly lower weight but never go to a stiff frame. The Head Flexpoint 1 is a good arm friendly racquet but would be hard to find today, but head has a number of current frames that I would consider very arm friendly.

      • #45226

        billy papa

        Hi Thomas,
        My Shop has recommended the “Head Speed” range of racquets.
        Which models would you recommend out of this range?
        I don’t want something too heavy and only play 1-2 times per week.
        Thanks

        • #45485
          Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
          Thomas Tennis
          Keymaster

          Billy,
          There are a range of Head Speed Racquets most are too light or too stiff. The Head Speed MP and the Head Speed Pro are alright if you need to go with the Head Speed line.

          • #50244

            Joe

            You mention the Wilson blade 18×20. I played with the 2013 rendition and it gave me elbow pain. Loved the racquet but didn’t love me. Is the 2015 that much better to recommend? Reviews seem mixed on comfort.

            • #50299
              Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
              Thomas Tennis
              Keymaster

              Joe,
              The Wilson 2015 Blade 18×20 is similar to the Wilson 2013 Blade 18×20, but it is more arm friendly since the 2015 frame is significantly more flexible.

  • #41467

    Rick

    hi,
    I had good results with the now-defunct Prince EXO3 Tour 100 that you used to have on your list. I’m wondering what you think of the newest generation of this racquet (not sure what it is — i guess what Ferrer uses?) and why it’s not on your list: is the newer version more or less arm-friendly (by your standards) than the older one? Also, which of the two Prince rackets on your list are closer in playability to the Prince EXO3 tour 100? I just ordered the Prince 98 ESP demos to see how that goes. I like the idea of 16×16 to get more spin, but hope the racquet isn’t too different from what I’m used to.
    thanks!
    Rick

    • #42006
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Rick,

      Ferrer uses the PRINCE Tour 100 16X18. It is a very arm friendly racquet, prince just has so many good arm friendly racquets I tried to keep a mix of brands on my list and not fill it completely with Prince racquets. The 16 x 16 open string pattern on the some of the new Prince racquets is very open friendly and great for increasing your spin, but they take time to get used to and the strings will break frequently unless you use a very durable string and a lot of string savers. The Prince Tour extra control string works great.

  • #41950
    Profile photo of Tom Palmer
    Tom

    Thomas: Just looking at specs it appears that the 2015 version of the Wilson 95 S should be ok as it has very similar specs to the 2014 model. Am I missing anything?

    • #42004
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Tom,
      You are absolutely right the 2015 of the Wilson Pro Staff is just as arm friendly as the 2014 model I will replace the 2014 model with this as I try to keep my top 10 list as up to date as possible

  • #37747
    Profile photo of Annie
    Annie

    Hi, just wondering when you will do a list which includes 2015 models? I think my Babolat Aero Drive Pro is causing my elbow pain, but I do love the power it provides. I use the RPM blast strings. Am thinking of changing to a Wilson Pro Staff or a Head Graphene XT Speed. Any thoughts?

    • #38705
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Annie,
      I am sure that your Babolat Aero Drive is causing you elbow pain as it as one of the worst racquets for arm problems and the most complained about from that standpoint. My current list includes 2015 racquets I just have not found any 2015 racquet better than any on my list. There any many Wilson Pro Staff racquets, my favorite one being the Wilson 2014 Pro Staff 95S, http://tenniselbowracquet.com/wilson-pro-staff-2014 I also think the HEAD Graphene XT Speed MP A ASP a very arm friendly racquet http://tenniselbowracquet.com/head-graphene-xt-speed

  • #37615

    Jenny

    How about the yonex exone Ai lite? It has flex at 62 and 2 pts head light 10.2 strung 9.7 unstrung which I know is a little light. But it comes in a 4 grip.

    • #37672
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Jenny,
      You are on the right track with that one. It would be a big improvement.

  • #35640

    Irene

    What about the Prince Ozone Hybrid racquet for beginner to intermediate player, for tennis elbow prevention? Thanks.

    • #37562
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Irene,
      There are a number of Prince Ozone Hybrids and they do not make them anymore of the ones that I could even find information on such as the Spectrum and the Shark, these racquets tend to be too light and too stiff typical so called beginner racquets that would be bad for your arm.

  • #36165

    Jenny

    Hi – I’m a beginner player on a D level team. 2.5 level. I do play 3-4 times a week though and have some elbow pain. I’m looking for a new racquet and am trying out a few from our local tennis shop. I’m trying out the Force 100 idapt by dunlop and the idapt force 105. The Force 100 says it is Headsize: 100 sq. Inches
    Weight (unstrung): 300g/10.6oz
    Balance (unstrung): 320mm / 7pts HL
    Beam: 23-26-24mm
    String Pattern: 16×19

    Tennis warehouse says it is 3pts HL and a 69 stiffness. Also they say weight is 11.3 strung.

    The force 105 feels head heavy but they say it is 4 pts HL, tennis warehouse says it is 2ps HL. strung weight on the 105 is 10.95, unstrung is 10.2. stiffness 68

    Both racquets can have a shock sleeve to vary the feedback from either soft to hard.

    I’m leaning toward the force 100 with a soft shock sleeve. Can you tell me your thoughts? Would this be a good choice for a beginner – I’m 4’11” and about 115 lbs woman. grip size is a 4 – zero. Kid size hand. Not very strong, but getting stronger! 🙂

    Thanks

    • #37560
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Jenny,
      I would strongly suggest you use a more flexible frame. An example of a much more flexible racquet that is close in weight would be the PRO KENNEX Ki Q Tour 295 Tennis Racquet http://www.tenniselbowracquet.com/pro-kennex-ki-295

      • #37564

        Jenny

        Hi Thomas,
        The racquet you recommend doesn’t seem to come in a grip size zero, 4. Do you have any other ideas?
        Jenny

  • #36371

    Andy

    Hi Thomas,

    After research and the really useful info on your site I think I’m getting closer to finding a replacement for my Pro Kennex Ionic Ki5 295 which I loved and caused me no elbow problems after really suffering in the past.

    The Yonex ai 98 and Volkl Organix 10 325 seem to be the best bets….although the weight of the volkl is obviously higher than I’m used to.

    I recently demoed the Pro Kennix Q5 on the advice of a local tennis shop but found it really lacked power…but like the feel/softness.

    Of the rackets above…if I wanted to find one with a bit more pop than the Pro Kennex Q5 but with an equally soft feel – which would you recommend?

    Thanks, great site.

    Ps….I can’t find an upgrade to the PK Ionic Ki5 anywhere…think it may have been dis-continued.

  • #34512
    Profile photo of Fernando
    Fernando

    Hello to all!! I¨m a tennis elbow sufferer for the last 4 months. I´m right in the healing process, it´s been long way, i´ve tried almost everything, daily: cold, rest, heat, soundwaves, physical therapy, theraband, etc. I can say that right now i almost don´t feel anything, just a little sensation on my elbow. I sold my old racquet (prince warrior 100) and my old reels of string (polys), and i´m ready to buy a prince tour 16×18, and tecnifibre x-one biphase, thanks to all the great comments and discussions in this forum. My question is, in your own experience, when should i start playing (minitennis, soft) again? Should i start right now, or should wait, and wait (not easy!) until the discomfort is Completely gone? I´ve been doing therapy, with my forearm, and i´m not taking any antiinflammatory. I´m 38, and a level 4.5 player. Please, share your comeback experiences. Thanks a lot!!

  • #11261
    Profile photo of tom
    tom
    Participant

    Hi Thomas, I was wondering if you had any experience with diagonally strung racquets like the Power angle Ace of Diamonds in terms of arm safety. The manufacturer claims that their system reduces shock by 40%. Any feedback you can provide about their technology.

    • #22240
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      That sounds interesting, I have no idea how stringing diagonally affects vibration, but the open 16 x 16 string pattern makes for a softer and more flexible arm friendly response

  • #8169

    Jose Luis

    You are right. I hadn’t thought about checking the Babolat site itself. Thanks 🙂

  • #8145

    Jose Luis

    Hi Thomas,
    I am wondering why you have not included on your list the “Babolat Pure Control 95”
    The specifications are: RDC Flex: 58 / Strung weight: 11.9 / Balance: 7 pts HL / Head size: 95 / Length: 27 in / Beam width: 19.
    Is there a reason why? If so, I would really like to know, because I am seriously considering this racket.
    Thank you very much for your attention Thomas.
    Best regards

    • #8163
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Yes, the reason is I am not so sure I believe the flex rating is 58 since it is listed as a 67 RA on babolats own website

  • #5795

    Justin

    Any opinions on the Volkl Organix 9? I went with the powerbridge but am wondering if I might get a bit more power and forgiveness with a bigger head.

    Here are the specs

    Head Size:
    98 sq. in. / 632.26 sq. cm.
    Length: 27in / 68.58cm
    Strung Weight: 11.4oz / 323.18g
    Balance: 5 pts HL
    Swingweight: 313
    Stiffness: 69
    Beam Width: 19mm / 20mm / 20mm /
    Composition: Organix / Carbon / Fiberglass
    Power Level: Low-Medium
    Stroke Style: Medium-Full
    Swing Speed: Medium-Fast
    Racquet Colors:
    Black/ Orange
    Grip Type: Volkl Synthetic
    String Pattern:
    16 Mains / 19 Crosses
    Mains skip: 8T 8H
    One Piece
    No Shared Holes
    String Tension: 50-60 pounds

    • #5864
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Justin,
      The Volkl Organix 9 is much too stiff to be considered arm friendly. I agree that the power bridge has a small head and is difficult for most players to use but you have other options such as the Volkl Organix 10 325g which is very arm friendly and has a 98 sq.in. head size or theVolkl Organix 10 295g also a 98 sq.in head

  • #4928

    Andre

    Hi again,

    I would just want to expand my question and/or explanation. Earlier (March 9, 2014 at 2:14 pm) you wrote that you are considering to put Prince Tour 100 16*18 (successor of Prince Exo3 Tour 100) but until now you didn’t. So if you were given to choose from these two (Tour pro 98 and Tour 100 16*18) which one would you take and why?

    Thx
    Andre

    • #5756
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Andre,
      Both the Prince Tour 100 16*18 and the Prince Tour pro 98 are both excellent arm friendly racquets and I would not hesitate to recommend either. If you really need to know the more arm friendly of the two I would go with the Prince Tour 100 16*18 which is slightly more flexible and has more of a head light balance

  • #4923

    Luca

    I don’t agree about beginners using advanced player racquets. Most of bed vibrations come from off center hits. If a low-intermediate player uses a 90/95 sq inches racquet, such as pro staff for example, despite it’s supposed to be “arm friendly” it will vibrate a lot because the player is not able to hit the small sweet-spot. Also about the weight: too light is bad, but too heavy is as bad. Someone who doesn’t do much sport and plays maybe one time per week should be very careful at handing a too haeavy racquet. At the end of the day: avoid extremely light and / or extremely stiff racquets, about the rest, follow usual guides. This is my own experience.

  • #4892

    Andre

    Hi

    What do you think about Prince tour 100 (16×18)? You did not put it on your list and I wonder why. Do you think that Prince tour pro 98 which is on your list is better (for arm friendlyness) than Prince tour 100 (16×18)?

    Thanks in advance for answer.
    Andre

  • #3994
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Dear Thomas,
    I played with Dunlop Biomimetic 200 and Prince EXO3 Rebel 95 and were very heavy, big swingweight and uncomfortable, then I gave a try and demoed the Head Graphene Radical MP, but seems a little stiff to me, though played with Xcel at 23kgs. I was looking on your racquet reviews and I was wondering to play the Prince Tour 98 ESP, seems not to heavy and, very important, has a low swingweight. Do you think it is a good option? Is this a top arm-friendly racquet? I would appreciate your response. Thank you.

    • #4255
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucian,

      Yes from what you describe the Prince Tour 98 ESP would be a great option for you

  • #3877

    Mark Shawzin

    I have always liked control rackets.

    Started with Sampras 85, then Federer 90.

    Got both tennis and golfers elbow (about 10+ years) ago.

    Switched to the Dunlop 100 (90 sq in), no problems.

    Recently I have been trying everything in order to get more “easy” power

    Couldn’t find anything, so I gravitated back to the Wilson Prostaff 95

    The old feelings of tennis elbow are returning.

    Every forum I read on TE suggests this should be a good racket (heavier, flexible etc)

    I would love to use this racket. Is it the racket or maybe different string to make more arm friendly?

    Is there another racket you would recommend?

    Would appreciate your response.

    • #4254
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mark,
      You are right the Wilson Prostaff 95 is a pretty arm friendly racquet, you could try the Wilson 2014 Prostaff 95S (the more open spin pattern should help), you could also try the PRINCE Tour 100 18X20 because it is extremely flexible with an RA of only 57, also lowering the string tension will be a big help and possibly try switching to a gut string which is more expensive but will not break as much if you string it at a low tension

  • #3645

    Joaquim

    Hi Thomas
    I have golfers elbow since I bought 2 babolat aeroprodrive gt (one year ago) and although I’ve tried different therapeutics (NSAID, 2 injections with corticoids, physiotherapist, etc) it still hurts in certain movements.
    I have a Tecnifibre Tfight 280 atp and I’m thinking to try other models, namely, yonex ezone ai 98 or the prokennex ki5 315. Can you tell witch do you think is better for me.

    • #4251
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Joaquim,
      Obviously the first thing is to never use the Babolat Aeroprodrive again, if you look through this site you will see more people with arm problems using that racquet than any other. The Tecnifibre Tflight 280 is ok, but the yonex ezone ai 98 and the prokennex ki3=5 315 are both outstanding and are both on my top 10 list, so my advise would be to try them both and get the one that feels best to you.

      • #4563

        Joaquim

        Thank You Thomas. The only problem is the difficulty, here in Portugal, to test the models without buy it.

        with my best regards

  • #2709
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Hello. After several tennis elbow issues I bought a Head Graphene Radical MP racquet after your indications and suits just good to my game, low swingweight and easy to use. I bought it with Head FXP Power 17 strings, strung at 25/24 and seems little stiff to my arm, I felt it a little unconfortable. Now I need to restrung it(I will try 23/22, the lower interval of the recommended tension for the frame I have) and I am not decided what to use: Babolat Xcel 17 or Wilson NXT 17. What do you suggest that suites better for my racquet? Thank you for your help.

  • #1894
    Profile photo of llerebours
    llerebours
    Participant

    Hi Thomas, I am a 35 years old player, between 3.0-4.0 level with almost 2 years playing. I am using Wilson BLX Tour since I started and I developed T.E. a couple of months after start. I was using Prince Poly spin 3D with 57 pounds, then I changed to Prince premier power 17 multifilament with 55 pound and also demoed the Prince EXO3 TOUR with the same string and pounds. I felt a smoother and more control game but less power with the EXO3 TOUR. I still have the T. E. problems because I didn’t rest at that time.
    After that I took a brake and I have 3 months without playing. I am going to play again soon. I am not sure of keeping the BLX tour with the premier string at 53 pounds or choose from a Prince shop one of this four models: EXO3 Tour 100 16×18, Tour 100 16×18 (new model), Tour 98 ESP and the Tour Pro 98. I would like you to tell me which one do you recommend or in what order I should try them. I can try them with the premier power 17, with 53 pounds or less, and also I what to know the fewer pounds that I can try. Thanks a lot for this helpful site, Regards…

    • #2619
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      The Wilson BLX Tour is fairly flexible but a bit too light to be very arm friendly, also the balance is close to even and should be more head light balanced. The prince racquets that you mentioned are all a bit heavier, very flexible and more head light. They are very close in terms of arm -friendliness, the ESP has the additional factor of a very open string pattern which makes it play even softer and more flexible and makes it easier to generate more spin, but it may take a little getting used to. I would narrow it down to either the Prince 98 ESP or the Pro Tour 98 both of which are on my top 10 list. You could string as low as 40 lbs although it would be unusual to go less than 50 lbs. The prince premier is also a good string

      • #2830
        Profile photo of llerebours
        llerebours

        Thanks a lot Thomas, I will try both. Hope to get back in track!!!!

  • #1641

    Justin

    Okay thanks, Thomas

    I’m going to stick with the power bridge scalpel unless I find something used on the cheap. Any advice on how to adapt to the player’s style racquet while playing? Thanks again, Justin

  • #1212
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    You are definitely on the right track and it makes sense to see how low you can go on the tension. Also you could have tried some of the racquets on my top 10 list that have the 100sq.in. head size since the Volkl Power Bridge is only 93sq.in. it is one of the more difficult frames to get used to.

  • #1211

    Justin

    Hi, Thomas

    Thanks for your site. I’ve recently developed some arm pain and found your site. I followed your advice and bought a Volkl Power Bridge 10 (2013) Mid (1/2) strung at 55 with Head FXP 16 String. Not quite used to the player’s style racquet but agree with your advice to learn with this type of racquet instead of develop problems and pain. When I hit it right the control is quite amazing when I don’t it’s all over the place. I also tend to lack the power of previous sticks.

    I wonder what you would say to stringing at a lower tension even as low as 40. What effect might you guess this would have on my strokes?

    Thanks again, Justin

  • #1210
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The only PK Ace I am familiar with is the PRO KENNEX Black Ace 98, which is a very good solid arm friendly racquet but a bit on the light side to be a top arm friendly racquet- it is in the same category as the Volkl Team Tour I would favor the Pro Kennex Kinetic KI5 315.

  • #1209
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Sorry your question has the same answer as a very recent post.

    I frequently receive this question and there really is not a simple answer to it. All of the racquets on my top 10 list are exceptionally arm friendly far above the average racquet. If you need help starting out take a look at the Kennex and Prince racquets on the list, just to play it safe only because those companies are well known for producing the most arm friendly racquets.
    As far as string any gut string is perfect or else start by checking my list of top 10 arm friendly strings

  • #1208

    Ted

    Hi, I was wondering if you saw my earlier post: I am a middle-aged man who’s getting back into tennis after a 20 year layoff. I don’t have any dreams of playing in tournaments or dominating at the club, I’d just like to be able to play with my wife and kids. I’ve had “tennis elbow” pretty severely in the past (from playing golf believe it or not) so I’m sensitive to it. I need to get a new racquet to replace my 25 year old Prince and I’d like a recommendation. I see the 10 racquets on your list, but can you recommend the absolute most arm-friendly racquet and string combination for someone who really doesn’t care about 5% more topspin or crushing it down the line? I just don’t want to be in pain after I play. And since I’m apparently only going to buy one racquet every 25 years I really don’t care about cost – I’d gladly pay $250 if it would keep my arm from hurting. Thanks for whatever help you can give.

  • #1207

    Marcin

    Hi,
    Has anyone tried PK Ace 295/325?
    Judging by paramteres should be arm friendly one…

  • #1206
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Both the ProKennex Ki 315 and the Prince Pro Tour are great arm friendly racquets and either is a huge improvement over your stiff Wilson Steam 96

  • #1205

    Mauricio Andries

    Hi Thomas. Im 36 years old and I was using a Wilson Steam 96 and I had Tennis elbow. I stopped for 2 months and I will start to play again next week and I need to buy a raquet. I was thinking in a Prokenex Ki5 315, but I red you blog and now I am thinking in a Prince tour pro. What do you recomend? I’m brazilian.. sorry for my bad english. Thks

  • #1204
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I frequently receive this question and there really is not a simple answer to it. All of the racquets on my top 10 list are exceptionally arm friendly far above the average racquet. If you need help starting out take a look at the Kennex and Prince racquets on the list, just to play it safe only because those companies are well known for producing the most arm friendly racquets.

  • #1203

    Ted

    I am a middle-aged man who’s getting back into tennis after a 20 year layoff. I don’t have any dreams of playing in tournaments or dominating at the club, I’d just like to be able to play with my wife and kids. I’ve had “tennis elbow” pretty severely in the past (from playing golf believe it or not) so I’m sensitive to it. I need to get a new racquet to replace my 25 year old Prince and I’d like a recommendation. I see the 10 racquets on your list, but can you recommend the absolute most arm-friendly racquet and string combination for someone who really doesn’t care about 5% more topspin or crushing it down the line? I just don’t want to be in pain after I play. And since I’m apparently only going to buy one racquet every 25 years I really don’t care about cost – I’d gladly pay $250 if it would keep my arm from hurting. Thanks for whatever help you can give.

  • #1202

    Rich Horton

    Is your list of racquets in order of preference (best at top, least preferred at bottom)? If there is no rank order, what would you say are your top three? Great site. Thanks.

  • #1201

    estella

    Thank you for the advice!
    I have actually never broken a string in twelve years of playing tennis but the stringer said if I would play with my multifilament in the Tour ESP I would probably have to restring it every month. I have not tried the Prince Tour 100 16×18 but I will ask for it next time and maybe also the Tour 100 Pro which is pretty flexible as well.

  • #1200
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The most important factor is the flexibility of the racquet frame. I would definitely stay far away from any frame that is not below 65RA. Have you personally had problems with breaking too many strings with an open string pattern? If so there are many other prince frames that are similar to Prince Tour 100T ESP (16X16) but not without such an open pattern. Have you tried the PRINCE Tour 100 Tennis Racquet, which has a 16 x 18 pattern.

  • #1199

    estella

    I would like to hear some opinions on what the most important factor is in tennis elbow problems.
    For the past 4 years I have played with the Head Microgel Instinct MP (18×19) with an arm friendly multifilament string. Unfortunately I have had tennis elbow issues several times.
    I recently tested the Head Graphene Instinct MP (16×19) and the Prince Tour 100T ESP (16X16). Both seemed to work well for my arm, tested both with polyester strings. The new Instinct felt easier on the arm than my old one, even with polyester strings, probably because of the more open string pattern. But the Head does have an RA of 70 while the Prince has 61, and the Prince has an even more open string pattern and the double bridge technology that should reduce vibrations.
    I could play the Head with an arm friendly string but the Prince needs a more durable string than multifilament.
    So I am wondering what the most important thing to consider is for my arm, the flexibility of the racquet, the string pattern or the kind of string?
    Is it even possible that a racquet with an RA of 70 can be arm friendly in the long run?

    BTW: I am an all court player, like playing singles as well as doubles and I have a one-handed backhand (mostly slice).

  • #1198
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    They are not equal the 100L is stiffer more head heavy and lighter. The 95S is a better choice for your arm.

  • #1197

    Andy

    Hi,

    Great site….how does the Wilson Pro Staff 100L compare with the 95S? Are there any other differences other than the head size or are both equally arm friendly?

    Thanks

  • #1196
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I do not like the Head YOUTEK IG Extreme Pro 2.0 it is much too stiff. I like the HEAD YT Graphene Prestige Pro which is on my list of top 10 arm friendly racquets

  • #1195

    Yogi S

    I’m demoing the new Head Graphene Extreme MP racket. I have been using Head YOUTEK IG Extreme Pro 2.0 and have tennis elbow and shoulder pain.
    I also felt it was a tad little to heavy for me after about a set into playing. What do you think of Head Graphene Extreme MP racket?

    Thanks.

  • #1194
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Prince EX03 Tour is a great arm friendly racquet but no longer in production. The PRINCE Tour 100 16X18 is new and about the same as the EX03 tour. I am not sure there is much power difference between the Prince EX03 and your Donnay, but you could try stringing it at 53 or 54 lbs.

  • #1193

    Srini

    Hi

    I have been looking at the Prince EXO3 Tour 100 racquet. I am a 4.0 player, predominantly baseliner, with a big swing and I have persistent TE problems if I am not careful. I currently play with the Donnay XP dual 102 with a Technifibre Redcode 17G on the mains and Tehnifibre NRG2 17G on the crosses strung around 58lbs.
    I can generate my own power, I like the prince racquet because of the flex rating and the reasonable weight. Due to some shoulder issues I dont want something too heavy. But I am worried about losing pace on my serves with the prince. what do you think?

    thanks
    Srini

  • #1192
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Tennis Express ships to Europe

  • #1191

    Diego

    Hi Thomas,

    Just for reference to other answers on your website I have realised that you recommend the Graphene version of the Prestige Pro but all my references is that the Graphene and IG models of the PP are equal in stiffnes.

    Please, let us know what differences are from one to the other regarding arm friendship.

    Regards.

    D.

  • #1190

    Diego

    Thanks Thomas,

    The problem with the ProKennex is that I cannot see them being sold in EU and I should probrably keep going with the MP version of my Prestige. I must get another frame then.

    What do you think about my strings setups, are they good enough for my elbow or you recommend other ones.

    Thanks a lot.

    D.

  • #1189
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Head Prestige Pro is an average arm friendly racquet since it is a bit stiff, but the Head Prestige MP is a much better and good arm friendly racquet. Yet you could still benefit by switching to the ProKennex Heritage Redondo Type C 93 after looking into that racquet I realized that it is an exceptional top arm friendly racquet – you might also want to look into the ProKennex Heritage Redondo Type C MP, since it has a 98 sq.in. head unless you are a very advanced player it would be difficult to consistently hit the sweet spot with a 93 sq.in. frame

  • #1188
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I do not recommend the Head Graphene Radical Pro . I recommend that you look into the HEAD YT Graphene Prestige Pro

  • #1187

    Diego

    Dear Thomas,

    I am an 39 leading to 40 yo recreational tennis player who has started 2 months ago with TE problems. I have been through rehabilation of my elbow for the las month and now I am thinking whether my equipment is the rigth one or I should go for something more appropriate to me.

    I currently play HEAD YouTek IG Prestige Pro&MP. The Pro one strung with Luxion BB ACE 1.12 and the MP strung with Tecnifibre X-One BiPhase 1.18, both full bed.

    I was wondering or thinking that I could go for thr ProKennex Heritage Redondo Type C 93 frames (I cannot get clear its stiffness) because on TW say that it has an RA 56 but PK website says 60.

    Pleae, can you advise whether I need to go for the PK or it is just more of the same I am playing at present or I am just going too wrong.

    Thank you very much in advance.

    D.

    PS. I have posted last nigth another similar comment but it just disappeared.

  • #1186

    Diego

    Hi Thomas,

    First of all congratullations for this website, it is really usefull.

    I have been having TE problems for the last 2 weeks and now I am am a bit undecided about whether I must swop my tennis frames or just keep with them. I play two different frames at present, HEAD Youtek Prestige Pro & MP. I am wondering if Prokennex Heritage Redondo Type C 93 will be better or just more of the same thing.

    In the other hand I strung my MP frame with X-One BiPhase 18g and the Pro one with Luxilon BB Ace 112 (18g too).

    Am I in the rigth direction or just going too wrong.

    Thank you very much in advance.

    D.

  • #1185

    Robert

    Hi Thomas,

    I am currently looking to update my existing racquets and, so far, the Head Graphene Radical Pro is my top contender. I did suffer from a bout of tennis elbow about a year or so ago and seem to be getting the beginnings of it again now. You had replied to an earlier post stating that you thought the Head Graphene Radical Midplus was a good choice of racquet, albeit a bit on the light side (the Pro is heavier). The flex rating of the Midplus is 64 and the Pro is 68, according to Tennis Warehouse and Tennis Express. In a conversation that I recently had with a Head rep, however, I was told that the same frame is used for both of these models. So, my questions are as follows: 1) Do you recommend the Graphene Radical Pro, and 2) Would weighting up the Midplus to equal the weight and balance of the Pro make it a stiffer racquet?

  • #1184

    RP

    I recently had tennis elbow and was wondering what would be better to use to prevent tennis elbow when practicing against another player as well as when using a ball machine; pressureless tennis balls such as the Tretorn micro-X tennis balls or standard pressured tennis balls such as the Pro Penn Marathon tennis balls, Wilson etc? Thank you for an excellent website.

  • #1183

    Rodrigo – Brasil

    I have Wilson 95S.
    I had tennis elbow and now I can play with the 95S.
    It´s a excelent raquet to topspin but so so to sack.
    But I know is the best raquet of list.
    Sorry my english. I holpe help you.

  • #1182

    Cem S

    Dear Thomas,

    I would like to ask you a life time of a racquet stiffness-wise. How long can a racquet keep its flexibilty? How many years can I use the same racquet safely in order not to injure my elbow? Thank you for your advice again.

  • #1181
    Profile photo of Stephen Lewis
    Steve Lewis

    Thanks. Just ordered a 2014 Pro Staff 95S used but like new and will be trying it out once the elbow is ready to get back to play.

    Steve

  • #1180
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The BLX Blade Team was a good racquet with a very flexible frame , but a bit too light. The Six One Tour BLX was much heavier but a bit too stiff.
    The Blade 98 BLX is in between the two in terms of weight and flex so that would be a good choice. The Wilson STeam 105s is much too stiff. The Vokyl Classic VI is also too stiff.
    Have you tried the WILSON 2014 Pro Staff 95S ?

  • #1179
    Profile photo of Stephen Lewis
    Steve Lewis

    I’m a 50 year old 3.5 player about 5 weeks in to tennis elbow. I’ve always been partial to Wilson racquets. I have a BLX Blade Team, Six One Tour BLX, Blade 98 BLX and BLX Steam 105s. Between now and when I get a more arm friendly racquet which one do you think I should use? Also, what do you think of the Voykl V1 Classic? Thanks.

  • #1178
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    This is another one of those racquets that has all the arm friendly characteristics but is too light to be a top arm friendly racquet. It is similar to the Prince Warrior 100 and the Volkl Team Tour in that sense this could be good for you if you can not get used to the weight of one of my top 10 frames

  • #1177

    Nicola

    Hi Thomas,
    What do you think about the Donnay XP Dual Black 102?.. the heavier version (295 g)..
    Thanks in advance
    Nicola

  • #1176

    Stanley

    Disagree with headsize assessment. Larger head sizes may have similar sized sweetspots, but the hitting area that is forgiving…the area that does not create shock, is definitely larger. The nearer the impact to the frame, the greater the shock. Larger heads are generally better for those who do not center the ball consistently.

  • #1175

    Elisa

    I see a lot of interesting posts on your page.
    You have to spend a lot of time writing, i know how to
    save you a lot of work, there is a tool that creates unique, SEO
    friendly articles in couple of seconds, just search in google – laranita’s free content source

  • #1174
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I only question the 63RA flex rating since tennisexpress http://www.tenniselbowracquet.com/babolat-control
    rates it at a 68RA and http://www.babolat.us/product/tennis/racket/pure-control-101200 rates it at 69RA

  • #1173

    Peter Pell

    You should test the Babolat Pure Control Tour. It is within the ranges of your top ten list in all characteristics (weight: 11.8, Balance: -7, stiffness: 63, head size: 98, and beam width: 21mm). I switched to this after finally growing tired of the prince vortex (which was great for my elbow but was unstable and the beam was far too wide for me). I find the Pure Control Tour to be the best racquet ever for my game.

  • #1172
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Hi the BLX 90 is not bad but it has a moderate flex. I cannot recommend any of the current Babolat racquets but as far as Head Racquets I do recommend the HEAD YT Graphene Prestige Pro http://tenniselbowracquet.com/head-graphene-prestige

  • #1171
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Prince Ex03 will not be any easier to maneuver it is about the same weight and swingweight as the Biomimetric 200. One racquet that comes to mind since I just spoke about it is the HEAD YouTek Graphene Radical MP which is a bit lighter with a lower swingweight but is still arm friendly

  • #1170
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I like both of them they are both pretty flexible arm friendly racquets but a bit on the light side to be top arm friendly racquets. They could be right for you if you cannot get used to or get comfortable with a racquet that is a little heavier.

  • #1169
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I really like both the Pro Staff 95S and the Yonex Ai 98 both are excellent arm friendly racquets and I would not be able to say which is better because they are so close. In this case you should go with the one that feels better to you. Also the 95S is a very open string pattern which would help you with spin but they do have a tendency to break easier

  • #1168
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian Tudorascu

    Though my Biomimetic 200 seems to be in good shape, I do not feel very comfortable playing with it and it is pretty hard to maneuver well while being low powered and I am an intermediate player. I thought about switching to Prince EXO3 REBEL 95. Any other suggestion, please?

  • #1167

    RP

    I was told today that the Prince EXO3 Rebel 95 on your list is discontinued. Any other arm friendly racquet you recommend with similar specs (wt. 12.1 oz, swing wt 300, Flex 58 etc)? Also was told that the Wilson Pro Staff Six.One BLX (95) was discontinued; is the new (2014) Pro Staff 95 as arm friendly as the Pro Staff Six.One BLX? I plan on using Babolat VS Team natural gut at the lowest tension recommended to make it more arm friendly & if I break strings too frequently increase from 17G to 16G to 15G to NXT etc if necessary. I like the Wilson Pro Staff 95 slightly better than the 95S & was told the 95S (16×15) open pattern would break gut strings too easily (I am a 4.0 to 4.5 player with mild/moderate spin). Also equally like the Yonex Ai 98? What would be the best and most arm friendly racquet in my situation, the Yonex Ai 98, the new Pro Staff 95 or some other racquet?

  • #1166

    Paulo

    Hi Thomas,
    What do you think about the new Head Graphene Radical MP? And S?
    Thanks in advance.
    Paulo

  • #1165

    alessandro

    I tryed the ki15 300 and i found it OK, as easy as the KI0.
    So now my choice is between the PK ki15 and the prince warrior pro 100. Will probably go for the formed because it more beginner-friendly.
    Thanks!

  • #1164
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The exact same factors go into golfers elbow as tennis elbow, though golfers elbow tends to be more related to your forehand. The Wilson Blade 98S is a good arm friendly racquet though a bit on the light side so some added weight would make it better.

  • #1163

    Adam Koszowski

    Thanks for all of your information. Do you have any different recommendations for golfer’s elbow vs tennis elbow or do all of the same mechanics and physics apply? Would you consider the Wilson Blade BLX 98S arm friendly (especially with a little added weight)? Thanks again.

  • #1162

    alessandro

    hi,

    thanks for the helpful website. Following elbow and shoulder pain i tried the Kennex Q5 (i suppose it is similar to the KI5), but I found it too difficoult to use for my level. I had better feelings with the ki10, and today I will try the Ki 15 300: are these two valid options? the shopkeeper suggests the ki15 because it is heavier but i fear the weight on my weak arm (it is also a bit more head heavy). I also tried a prince warrior pro 100, I see you consider it good too: better that the KI15 300? It also is a bit difficoult for me (as opposed to the easier ki10)but i had fun with it.
    thanks!

  • #1161

    Nora Krist

    Thanks!! Will definitely try that one, as well as others on your list, out.

  • #1160
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    That racquet is not doing your arm any good you need a more flexible frame The Wilson Prostaff Six.One BLX (95) is only slightly heavier but actually has a lower swingweight and is considerably more flexible.

  • #1159

    Nora Krist

    Thanks for all this valuable information! I have been suffering from tennis elbow for about a year and have tried everything to cure it (rest, PT, acupuncture, ART massage, cortisone injections, PRP, and the tenex fast procedure). I still have some pain but would like to take a few baby steps back on the court. Before I had to lay off, I was playing with the Wilson Steam 99S, and my pro put Shock Shield (I think that is the name) strings in my racquets. I am a 4.0 player. Any suggestions you could give me on my current racquet or specific suggestions of others to try out would be greatly appreciated. Many thanks!

  • #1158
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I have recommended the Volkl Team Tour, which is lighter than the traditional arm friendly racquets but is still quite flexible and head light balanced another possibility would be the Prince EXO3 Rebel Team 98.

  • #1157

    Aymar

    I started having the wrist and TE after I switched to the Prince Exo3 rebel 95. Been trying different strings and stringing low. Not sure how low I will have to go. Any suggestions?

  • #1156

    Al

    I demoed:
    -Prokennex Ki15 260. not much difference from my old frame
    -Prokennex Q5: too difficult for my level, caused pain
    -Prokennex Ki 10: seemed easy enough
    -I prince that i do not remember but was quite good and similar to the Ki10
    So now i am considering the ProKennex Ki10, haeavier that what i am used too but not too much. I do not find any comprehensive review, would you think it is a good option? Or only the ki15 is really arm friendly?

  • #1155

    Al

    Since I do not have a strong arm I find hard to play with heavier frames (300g plus) so i demoed lighter options, balanced head heavy to help me get the ball across (my level is quite bad at the moment:)) but i realized that they were not helping with the pain issues. Heavy frames do not help either and cause muscle pain.

  • #1154

    Al

    I recently re-started paying tennis and quickly developed elbow paing and shoulder pain (deltoids i guess). I am playing with an old, light and stiff dunlop.

  • #1153

    Al

    I recently re-started paying tennis and quickly developed elbow paing and shoulder pain (deltoids i guess). I am playing with an old, light and stiff dunlop.
    Since I do not have a strong arm I find hard to play with heavier frames (300g plus) so i demoed lighter options, balanced head heavy to help me get the ball across (my level is quite bad at the moment:)) but i realized that they were not helping with the pain issues. Heavy frames do not help either and cause muscle pain.
    I demoed:
    -Prokennex Ki15 260. not much difference from my old frame
    -Prokennex Q5: too difficult for my level, caused pain
    -Prokennex Ki 10: seemed easy enough
    -I prince that i do not remember but was quite good and similar to the Ki10
    So now i am considering the ProKennex Ki10, haeavier that what i am used too but not too much. I do not find any comprehensive review, would you think it is a good option? Or only the ki15 is really arm friendly?

  • #1152
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    You are on the right track with a very flexible racquet, along with soft and loose strings.

  • #1151

    RP

    With regard to tennis elbow, what are the advantages/disadvantages of the Pacific Gut Varnish spray (versus silicone spray etc) and the Babolat Elastocross (gut string pads)? Does the Gut Varnish or Elastocross affect spin, comfort etc and/or does it increase string durability? What are the best tennis handle grips (genuine leather, synthetic leather, etc) and best string dampeners with respect to tennis elbow prevention? Thank you.

  • #1150

    Elisabeth

    Yes, I think I will get a new racquet…I’m a 3.0 player..would you recommend the Donnay XP Dual 102? Also sometimes I see it with the word Lite after the name, and sometimes not…are these two different racquets…
    Thanks for your help!

  • #1149
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Have you ever hit with the Prince Tour 100T ESP? If so could you compare it to the 98 ESP you have in your list?
    The 2 are very similar and very arm friendly racquets. The 98 is slightly heavier and more flexible with a slightly lower power level, the 98 is more arm friendly but both are very arm friendly

  • #1148

    Aymar

    Hi,
    Bought the 2012 version of the Prince Exo3 rebel 95 based on the list here. Been having severe wrist, elbow and shoulder issues. Use soft Kevlar in the cross(16) 50 lbs and synthetic gut in main (17) 48 lbs. Switched from Dunlop biometrics 200 plus. Also I am using a smaller grip 4 1/4 compared to 4 3/8. What are your thoughts?

  • #1147

    Mark Murphy

    Thanks for the insight. Just picked up the Dunlop Biomimetic Max 200G and played 5 hours with it this past weekend. No sore elbow or shoulder! There is so much more feeling with this racquet than my old Aerogel 500 Tour!

  • #1146

    Brett

    Have you ever hit with the Prince Tour 100T ESP? If so could you compare it to the 98 ESP you have in your list?

  • #1145

    Brian

    hi Thomas,

    Good stuff! Enjoy reading the communications. Please share your thought on what I should do. I have been using BLX 90 with full poly and strung at 47lbs. It is a good combination, but I would usually feel fatique or sore at my elbow and wrist. DO you think this is a sign for new racquet? I have been watching Babolat and Head racquets recently. Do you have any recommendation on racquets, as I am looking for a bit more power and comfort? Comfort comes first, since I play 3 to 4 times a week. Thanks again.

    Cheers,
    Brian

  • #1144

    Adam Koszowski

    How does the Wilson Blade 98S fare in terms of being an arm friendly racket? With a little added weight could it crack your Top 10 list? I am suffering from debilitating golfer’s elbow. Are there any characteristics of rackets that make them friendlier for golfer’s elbow as opposed to regular tennis elbow? Thanks so much.

  • #1143
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    They are both good but the Yonex V Core Tour 97 is considerably heavier but slightly stiffer so I would go with the one that feels better to you. Those are the 2 best current models.

  • #1142
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    If you are developing signs of tennis elbow and using a very light and stiff racquet like the Head TI S2 which is very bad for your arm, you definitely should consider switching as soon as you can.

  • #1141

    Elisabeth

    I have had the Head Ti S2 for over 10 years and this year Im developed mild TE…I am getting the racquet restrung this week, but now Im wondering if I need a new racquet! Im a low intermediate player, play about once a week. Do you think I need a new racquet?
    Thanks!

  • #1140

    RP

    What is more arm friendly, the Yonex V Core Tour 97 or the Yonex Ai 98 or is there an even better arm friendly Yonex racquet that you would recommend? Thank you for all of your help.

  • #1139

    Patrick

    Hello, how is wrist pain related to tennis elbow or arm issues. After suffering from TE I switched raquets to the wilson 6.1 95s. Love how I play with the raquet but get wrist pain after a tennis session. Do wrist strenghtening exercises exist?

  • #1138
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    There are not many places that do this and they are hard to find, but I would not want to use such an old racquet especially without testing it, so if you want to stick with this racquet to save money I am not sure you will save after factoring the cost of testing it

  • #1137
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Dunlop Biomimetic is a arm friendly racquet and you are stringing at a low tension so it would be unusual to develop elbow problems under these conditions. It could be possible that you have a racquet that was not built to its specs or it could have changed especially if it is old. See if you could find a place in your area that could measure its stiffness, balance and weight to see how far it is off. I would still recommend trying one of the racquets in my top 10 list since for whatever reason this one is not working for you.

  • #1136
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Since last year I am playing with a Dunlop Biomimetic 200 having monofilament strings and after I play, I have couple of days of elbow low pain. Is it possible to have these issues because the racquet is maybe too heavy(though I feel comfortable with it) or could be the strings(tension is around 23 kg)? Should I change the racquet and try one from your top 10 list, maybe one having a lower stiffness? Thank you for your answer.

  • #1135

    John

    Thank you Tom for this great website.
    Do you know if I can get specs online for a vintage 80’s (I believe) racket? I picked up a Pro Kennex Conquest 90 recently, but don’t know if I should be using it because of past arm issues. Thanks for any info you can provide.

  • #1134
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    All of the racquets on my top 10 list are very arm friendly and the differences between them are very small, so it would be a matter of choosing the one that feels best to you.

  • #1133
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Yes I would consider the Dunlop Biomimetic 200 to be a very arm friendly racquet.

  • #1132
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Yonex RQiS1 Tour 95 is a very arm friendly racquet. The YONEX VCORE Tour 97 Tennis Racquet is the new Yonex Racquet that is the most similar and also very arm friendly.

  • #1131
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    If I have the option of buying one racquet between Wilson Prostaff BLX 6.1 95 and the two Prince frames from your top 10, which is the best option for arm problems? Thank you.

  • #1130
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Great site, very helpful. I would like to know if the Dunlop Biomimetic 200 could be considered an arm friendly racquet. Thank you.

  • #1129

    RP

    I currently play with a Yonex RQiS1 Tour 95; what are the racket specifications which are good and bad with regard to tennis elbow and overall is this an arm friendly racket? What type of strings and string tension do you recommend for the main and cross strings for a 4-4.5 tennis player with moderate topspin and tennis elbow?

    I may purchase a new racket later this year or next year and prefer to stay with Yonex; what are the best Yonex rackets currently available with regard to tennis elbow that you would recommend for me? Are any of the newer currently available rackets similar to the Yonex RQiS1 Tour 95 and are any of the newer rackets significantly better than the RQis1 Tour 95 with regard to preventing tennis elbow? Thank you for providing an excellent website and for all of your help.

  • #1128
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Unfortunately I cannot say either of those racquets or for that matter any Babolat racquets are as arm friendly as the Pure Storm which is now discontinued.

  • #1127

    T_Brown

    How do the Babalot Pure Control 95 and Pure Control Tour + compare to the Babalot Pure Storm LTD GT? I was able to demo the Pure Control Tour + today, and I loved it. I was able to generate lots of power and depth with sufficient control. It didn’t have the same flexibility as the Prince Tour 98 ESP (I also tried it today); however, I liked the way I hit with the Babalot better (the Prince was not as forgiving as the Babalot).

    The local tennis shop has used Pure Storm LTD GT racquets on sale for $90 (they are in good shape), but I cannot demo them. If they are comparable to the Pure Control line, then I may end up getting those.

    Thanks in advance. Also, very informative and useful web site – thank you for taking the time to catalog all of this information.

  • #1126
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Babalot Pure Drive is one of the most unfriendly arm racquets on the market It was only a matter of time before you start developing arm trouble with that extremely stiff frame. You need to switch gears and start looking at some flexible frames if you want to have an enjoyable summer and lifetime playing tennis.

  • #1125

    Sara

    Hi Thomas, could you comment on the babolat pure drive as an arm friendly racquet? I have been using the 10.6 oz, balance of 320mm (+/-7) for a few years and it’s been fine for me till now. Should I switch racquets or restring with less tension? Mine has been strung at 55lbs. Your views would be greatly appreciated! Your site has been very useful to me!

  • #1124
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I think you are taking all of the right steps by selecting a arm friendly racquet and you cannot go wrong with gut at a low tension and the arm brace cannot hurt. Good luck and I hope you are back to full speed soon.

  • #1123
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I am happy that I was able to make a difference.

  • #1122

    Aussie John

    Had surgical repair done to the common extensor origin (aka tendon repair at the attachment to the lateral condyle) last November and am almost ready to start hitting again. Extensive research of racquets and strings with a view to keeping the cost down has resulted in me ordering the highly regarded Pro Kennex Kinetic Pro 5G. I string my own racquets and intend to string the 5G with 18 gauge Alpha Gut 2000, which once again is a cost effective but well regarded multi filament string. I intend to string mains and crosses at 52lbs. What would be your view of that frame with those strings as being very tennis elbow friendly? I will also wear a Band It elbow brace when I recommence playing.

  • #1121

    Jerald Rogers

    First of all, thank you. This site has been a wealth of info. A little over a year ago I went to hit with my son, his friend and his friend’s dad. I was never really a very serious player and had only played an hour or so at a time here or there in the last 5 years. After three hours of play I woke the next morning not even able to pick up a coffee cup. Over the next 3 or 4 months I rested, rehabbed and shopped for a tool that wouldn’t put me in this position again (pain is an incredible motivator). I was using a head heavy and very light (and likely stiff) Wilson Triad. I now use a Prince EXO3 Rebel 95 with Technifibre X-One Biphase strings–no more issues, period. My son (starting high school next year) loves his APD, but my ordeal has planted the seed that we may need to look at other alternatives for his presently young (and presently healthy) elbow. He is a spin monster, so we will probably check out the Prince Tour 98 ESP. Thanks again.

  • #1120
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The DUNLOP Aerogel 500 Tour Racquets are very stiff racquets and if you have any arm or shoulder pains you definitely should look into switching. The DUNLOP Biomimetic Max 200G is a very good option and it used to be on my top 10 list. The Avery 5 is also good I like the specs on it and I also like the Yonex VCore 97 Tour. I would say that switching to any of the racquets you are considering or any of the racquets on my top 10 list will put you well on your way to good arm health.

  • #1119
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    That’s always a problem with demo’s and the string and tension could make a big difference, regardless if you have arm problems and you currently use the Babolat Aeropro Drive your arm will benefit greatly from any of the racquets that you demo’d. Whatever you choose will take time to get used to and you will need to experiment with different strings and tensions. Maybe you could get the Wilson BLX Pro Staff 6.1 95 and see if you can string it with the same string that was on your demo.

  • #1118

    Matt

    Based on what you’ve written on this web site, I ordered 4 demo racquets and just played with them yesterday. I go tthe Volkl Organix 10 325, the Wilson BLX Pro Staff 6.1 95, the Prince Tour 98 ESP, and the Pro Kennex KiQ Tour 295. They unfortunately didn’t have the Pro Kennex K15 315 in stock for demos. My problem is that they were all strung with different strings and I have no idea what tensions were used. Based on looking at the racquets, I thought the Wilson would be least my favorite (I currently use a Babalot AeroPro Drive, Nada’s racquet and have been suffering from very bad arm and shoulder problems). But I liked the Wilson the most. I’m just concerned that the different strings could have caused me to like it more than the other 3. Please let me know what your thoughts are. Thanks!

  • #1117

    Mark Murphy

    Great site, provides valuable advice!

    I have been playing with a Dunlop Aerogel 4D 500 Tour strung with Prince synthetic at 60lbs. Last year I started to develop elbow pain. Also own a Radical Micro Gel oversize, no pain yet no feel.

    Considering switching to the Dunlop Max 200 G, Avery M5, or the Yonex VCore 97 Tour.

    Thanks

  • #1116

    David

    Hi Thomas just a couple questions on arm friendly racquets. The pro at my Tennis club is sponsored by Dunlop so I was wondering what Dunlop racquets are considered arm friendly and how would they compare to your top ten list? I.e close or not close to making it.

    Also I use a Donnay XP-Dual Pro racquet because I was told it is arm friendly. How would it rank for you list of arm friendly racquets?

    Thanks a lot.

  • #1115
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    My opinion is that the blade is a good racquet but not the most arm friendly due to its stiffness. Out of the 3 options you gave option 3 is far and away the best. The Prince EXO3 Tour is one of the best arm friendly racquets.

  • #1114

    JZ

    Hi – Nice page, thanks for the info. I’m a mid 30s tennis player with on/off pbls with golf elbow. I currently play with a blade 93 (2013) with an all-multi setting – love the plow through and control, esp with my 1hbh. I need more spin to play anyone at 5.0+ level so i tried a few settings: 1. blade 93 with soft-poly/multi in main/cross (preferred setting so far but slightly harsher on arm) 2. head graphene speed pro with all-multi and a tad of lead tape on the head 3. prince exo3 tour 100 18×20 with soft-poly/multi in main/cross and a tad of lead tape on the head.

    Could you please tell me your opinion on those settings, esp what you think of the blade 93 as far as elbow issue goes? Note that i play at very low tension (high 40s) and i have a 1hbh. Thanks in advance!

  • #1113
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I really like the Prince Tour 100t ESP it is a great arm friendly racquet with great spin potential maybe a little on the light side to be a truly top arm friendly racquet. I don’t really like the Wilson 6.1 95S because the frame is too stiff.

  • #1112

    Patrick

    Your response will be greatly appreciated.

  • #1111
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    My opinion is that both of these are excellent arm friendly racquets in fact I had the Prince Tour 100 in my top 10 list and only took it off because prince temporarily stopped production. You can find some good arm friendly strings at http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-string

  • #1110

    Albert

    Hi Thomas,

    I played with an Aero Pro Drive GT for a year, which gave me TE-like symptoms. I then switched to the Yonex Ezone XI 98 for about a year, which has been perfectly fine with the exception of having to adjust to the weight. But last weekend I had a 4-hour session of heavy hitting and point play, and I’m experiencing similar symptoms again. In the market for demoing some alternative options.

    Wanted to know your opinion regarding the Prince EXO3 Tour 100 and subsequent Prince Tour 100 racquets. Links below:
    http://www.tennisexpress.com/prince-exo3-tour-100-16×18-tennis-racquet-20916
    http://www.tennisexpress.com/prince-tour-100-16×18-tennis-racquet-38258

    Also, I think another part of what aggravated the pain was the Yonex Tour Super 850 Pro. I really disliked this string, felt very stiff after a few hours of heavy hitting. Could you also recommend some spin-friendly strings? I am not a frequent string breaker.

    Best,
    Albert

  • #1109
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Pro Kennex has a lot of arm friendly racquets and technology to reduce vibration and strain on your arm. I guess you could say they specialize in arm friendly racquets, they certainly consider it in all of their racquets, but they also have some racquets that are very light and very stiff that I would never recommend.

  • #1108

    Kevin

    Hi Thomas,

    Great site, but I was a little surprised to read “…there are no companies that I know of that are geared toward “arm-friendly” tennis equipment.” Arm friendliness is what the PK’s Kinetic line is all about. The 7G, and now the Ki5x, got me back in the game ten years ago, and I haven’t had a problem since (except for a play test of a Babolat Pure Strike which brought it right back). I string them at 60 lbs with VS Gut and haven’t all is good. The Kinetic system works, and PK took the time to prove it at the MIT Sportslabs. A 20% reduction in shock and a 43% reduction in vibration is HUGE. Couple the Kinetic system with a headlight 315 gram frame and a 62 stiffness rating and natural gut and you get what I and countless other PK converts consider arm the friendliest setup on the planet. Keep up the good work, but please give some well deserved credit to the only company out there that has gone after the problem head on, not with goofy unproven gimmicks, but with good old fashioned Newtonian physics.

  • #1107

    Patrick

    Hello, went in to demo a Prince tour 100t ESP. Ended up playing with a wilson 6.1 95S. Loved it. Felt right and I could play in all phases of the game. What are your thoughts on these raquet elbow and arm wise?

  • #1106
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Wilson five.two is a very light racquet and bad for your arm. The yonex ezone ai 100 and the Wilson pro staff six one 100 are a bit stiff and are not real arm friendly. The Wilson pro staff six one 100LS is pretty flexible and a decent arm friendly racquet but still a bit too lite weight to be a top arm friendly racquet, though the best selection of the four you mention.

  • #1105

    Emma

    Hi Thomas,

    I need your thoughts and advise on yonex ezone ai 100 and wilson pro staff six one 100 and 100LS. I’m an intermediate player currently using wilson five.two.

  • #1104
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I don’t know where you heard this racquet is good. It is awful for your arm it is too light, and has a head heavy balance.

  • #1103

    joe wings

    I have been off for 1 year with tennis elbow. Every tennis shop I have gone to n tells me the” Wilson five blx “is the best. The reason is the rubber separating the head from the throat and handle. So far I only feel mild pain. My question is why is this racket not even mentioned on any tennis chat boards. Does anyone know about this racket? Is there something better out there?. Thank you. I’m a 4.0 that needs to go back to 3.5. Doubles player and i’m 60 y.o.

  • #1102
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    You are right the Wilson Steam 99S is a stiff racquet and could cause arm problems. The Wilson ProStaff 95S is a very good choice because not only is it a very arm friendly racquet but it is also great for easily generating additional spin.

  • #1101

    Don

    I have the opportunity to purchase a never-been-used Pro Kennex Ki 5 315 for $50. However, it is an older model – it has the old paint job (yellow, black and white). Would I be wiser to spend an additional $100 for a new model?

    And thanks for the information on your site! The Pro Kennex Ionic Ki 5 PSE I played with for years came to be too heavy for me. The information on your site guided me to the Ki 5 315. I love it – it’s great for my game – 56 year old male playing doubles and singles at 4.0 level.

  • #1100

    Enroque Donoso

    Thomas, first of all thanks for taking the time to put this site online with this key imformation to prevent Tennis Elbow or at least to understand how to deal with it. I have a question for you that really scares me. All the racquets that you list here are all racquets that if you ask a tennis coach or people that think that understand about tennis and all the variables that affect a racquet and your play are going to tell you that they are too stiff and heavy for you and I would say that almost 100℅ of them are going to recommend you a racquet that for sure is going to hurt you…for example the overrated and oversold Babolat Pure Drive. Why you think that there is a kind of miss understood or stereotype that all these racquets are stiff and not for a club player. Let me tell you that I always played with the Head Prestige line of racquets until one day I heard those bad recommendations and change toa Babolat Pure Drive and of course resulting in bad playing and tennis elbow. The last question and comment..one of the things that I’m doing now is playing with softer string than before…actually trying natural gut (Babolat VS Touch) with the prestige youtek iG frame that I loved but my wallet is suffering because I’m breaking them under an hour of tennis. What rring would you recommend eyes closed if you are looking for comfort like natural gut.

  • #1099

    Fred C

    Thanks for the info. Do you have any thoughts on the Wilson ProStaff 95S or any of the other spin raquets? I currently play a Steam 99S which doesn’t appear to meet your criteria (and I am feeling it!).

  • #1098
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Vibration dampeners help a little and once you get used to the feel of playing with a dampener you will not want to play without one.
    One of the most important characteristic of an arm friendly racquet is a heavy racquet at least over 11oz but some people might have trouble handling a heavy racquet in which case I recommend a heavy racquet with a lower swing weight below 300, that way you get the benefits of a heavy racquet without any downside.

  • #1097
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The KI5 and the Head Graphene pro are both great arm friendly racquets, so you would need to make your choice based on how the racquets feel and play for you.

  • #1096

    Alberto Rufini

    Thomas,
    I use KI5 315 for 2 years. However I’m thinking to change bu Head graphene prestigie pro as you recomended
    Do you see I might get some improve considering soim side?
    Thanks in advance
    Alberto

  • #1095

    Diego_Switzerland

    Hi
    Thanks a lot for sharing all this knowledge and helping so many tennis players.
    Do you consider vibration dampeners to be helping or making TE worse? Also, have you considered the Swing Weight as part of your tests/research? This variable is probably correlated to the remaining variables, but I wonder if you have any “healthy Swing Weight” range in mind.
    Thanks a lot!

  • #1094
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Overall the Dunlop 200 lite is a good racquet for your arm and the string is not bad. It still might help to get a new frame, since your racquet might be one that is not performing up to its specs especially if it many years old.

  • #1093
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I see no reason to limit yourself to an 18 x 20 string pattern that sounds like just his own personal opinion. More open string patterns are generally better for your arm and they produce more spin, the downside is the string tends to break easier which could be a problem for frequent string breakers.

  • #1092

    Adam

    Hi,
    I have had tennis elbow for the last 5 months and its taking so long to heal.
    I was using a Dunlop 200 lite with Babolat Blast strings. Do you think this racquet is good to prevent tennis elbow? Or has the strings caused my damage?

  • #1091

    Monique

    Thanks for the advice. All the specs are right but my tennis instructor dislikes the stringpattern 16×18 for me. He preferes 18×20. I am an advanced “rooki “

  • #1090

    Cem S

    Dear Thomas,
    I would like to thank you again million times for your golden advices. I had a tennis elbow for one and a half year, but after finding your website, and listen to your advices, I first switched to head youtek ig prestige mid. And my tennis elbow is gone quickly within a month. However that racquet is a bit limiting my game. Then I listen to your advice again and switched to wilson pro staff 6.1 95. At first I was a little bit scared since switching from a heavier racquet to a lighter one might cause my tennis elbow apear again. But after asking you, I listened to your advice and made the switch, and every thing is ok now. Thank you again. How wonderful and magical this site is. I recommend to every one.

  • #1089
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    If you must use a lighter racquet it will not be a top arm friendly racquet but it could be a lot more arm friendly than your current racquet if you find one over 10oz. with a head light balance and flexible frame, after some research I found the following example http://tenniselbowracquet.com/volkl-team-tour

  • #1088

    Monique

    Thank you for answering. I saw your list with elbow friendly racquets but all of them are to heavy for me. I would like to have a racquet max weight 10.6 strung (300 gr). I am small 1.52m and i have the smallest grip.
    Is it possible the specs not too heavy and elbow friendly

  • #1087
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    This racquet is bad for your arm, it is very light with a head heavy balance.

  • #1086

    Monique

    Hi,
    What are you thoughts about Wilson Five 103 Racquet or Wilson Five 103 BLX Racquetwith elbow issues. I have some problems with my arm some time.

  • #1085
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The specs of the Wilson Prostaff Six One BLX are very similar to the head youtek ig mid. The only difference being the weight, but the Wilson Prostaff Six One BLX is still heavy enough to be in my top 10 list and you could always add some lead tape into the handle, to make it slightly heavier and make the balance more head light.

  • #1084
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    That is a tough call since both are very arm friendly. I would probably go with the one that feels best to you, but if both feel the same the Volkl Organix Mid could be slightly better for your arm due to its being slightly more flexible and more head light of a balance.

  • #1083

    Tan

    hi Thomas
    thanks for the time and advice. Any thoughts on the Volkl organic 10 Mid vs the 10 325? The latter is stiffer but it is tough on the arm? thanks

    T

  • #1082

    Cem S

    Hi, I would like to add something. I have head youtek ig mid, after switching to this racquet, my tennis elbow pain is gone. But its playabilty restricts my game in some ways. That’s why I plan to test wilson prostaff six one 95, which is lighter than head youtek ig mid. But if switching to a lighter racquet even if it is in your top ten list has a risk to sever my tennis elbow, I would not try this. That’s why I ask your advice concerning these two racquets compared to their arm friendliness. Thank you again for your advice
    Cem

  • #1081

    Paige

    My doctor recommended a golf ball muscle roller for my tennis elbow, worked very well and reduced the soreness, seriously check it out! http://zzathletics.com/Golf-Ball-Muscle-Roller-Massager-GBMR1.htm

  • #1080

    Cem S

    Dear Thomas,

    I would like to ask you a question concerning a racquet choice. Which is more arm friendlier between those two option (I wonder because both are in your top ten list): head prestige youtek ig mid and wilson pro staff six one 95. Thank you for your concern. Best

  • #1079
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Pro Kennex Q5 295 and 315 are stiffer than the PRO KENNEX Kinetic Ki5 315 so they are not as arm friendly.

  • #1078
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Prince EX0 Tour is a great arm friendly racquet, the only reason I removed it from my list is that it temporarily went out of production and was replaced by the PRINCE Tour 100 16X18 Tennis Racquet, which I am currently looking into putting on the list.

  • #1077

    Mynell

    Thomas,

    I am planning to demo the Prokennex Q5 298 and 315. Would you consider these to be on par with the K5 you recommend in your list? Better? Bad golfers elbow here and looking for some options. Really appreciate your feedback!

    Mike

  • #1076

    MG

    Hi, why don’t you have prince exo tour 100 16×18 in your top 10 list? I see you recommend it to a bunch of people in comments. I think it is the best arm friendly specs especially for women, because its not as heavy as the rest. love your site. Thanks for all the info.

  • #1075
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I would be wary of the Babolat Pure Control because the stiffness is listed as 69ra on the Babolat website and 68 on tennisexpress but 63 only on tennis-warehouse I would look suggest looking at some other models with a flex no higher than around 63 above 11oz’s with a head lite balance, you could start by considering some of the racquets in my top 10 list.

  • #1074

    Bob

    Hello,

    A few years ago I had a problem w/ TE. I changed to a Volkl PB 8 and went to a hybrid setup w/ natural gut in the mains. I iced, stretched and worked on arm strength. The TE went away within a few months. I moved to a Yonex xi 100 and didn’t have any problems.It’s now back and I think it’s from doing a 3-month racquet demo program. I’m a 4-4.5 level player looking to continually improve. I can vary my shot type but like topspin the most. I’m back to the natural gut hybrid but since the Yonex is a little stiff I’m thinking of changing. I understand your comments about moving to a players racquet. What would you recommend. I just looked at the Babolat Pure Control Tour and the stiffness rating is 63 and the weight and balance look ok. I’d appreciate your opinion on that one and any other recommendations you could offer. Thanks and it’s good to see a website that gives good straight info on TE and the game.

  • #1073
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Yonex EZONE Ai 98 is an arm friendly racquet and switching to that racquet from the Babolat Aeropro Drive GT should definitely help your arm.

  • #1072
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Both the Prince Tour 100t and the Wilson Pro Staff 100 LS would be major improvements over the Head Mid Plus Extreme 100 and the Volkl Organix 8 especially the Prince Tour 100t which is not only a lot more flexible but the open string pattern will make it play even more flexible.

  • #1071

    R.

    Hi Thomas,
    Being a heavy top spin player and using Babolat AeroPro Drive GT (and a starting TE :s), I’m considering purchasing the Yonex EZONE Ai 98. I demoed the racket and was amazed about the control it provides. What are your thoughts on this rackets? Thanks for your time.

  • #1070

    Patrick

    Hello! I currently play with a head mid plus extreme 100 in, and do ok with the arm after trying some old racket that took me out of the sport for about a year due to arm problems.. I am in the upgrade process, and purchased a volkl organix 8 300 g, but gave me arm problems as well. What are your thoughts on the prince tour 100t esp and the new wilson pro staff 100 LS. They have very similar specs in terms of weight to my current head racket.

  • #1069
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Out of the racquets you mentioned they are all very stiff except for the Head Speed M/p which is of moderate stiffness. If you are looking for a racquet that would be better for your arm you should be looking towards flexible frames, you could start by considering some of the racquets on my top 10 list http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets

  • #1068
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    My thoughts are that they made the Pure Control too stiff so I would stay away from it for that reason.

  • #1067

    Barry

    Hi Thomas. Thanks again for answering my earlier post. Just a quick follow-up question to the Pure Storm GT Ltd. I saw Babolat recently coming out with its successor – the Pure Control – in various models (tour and 95). I noticed its flexibility is in the high 60s (69 for tour, and 67 for the 95). Everything else seems good (weight, balance). Is this also a good option? I’m thinking since it’s deemed as the “successor” for the Pure Storm and it’s a more recent model, it may be a better buy? Appreciate your thoughts. Thanks!

  • #1066
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The division of racquets into various levels from beginner to advanced completely ignores the arm friendly aspect of a tennis racquet. Beginners are the group most vulnerable to arm problems and yet I have yet to see a so called beginner racquet that is not bad for your arm. A beginner racquet may help your game in the short run but you will play better and have a lot less chance of being injured in the long run if you can get used to an advanced arm friendly racquet. The Pure Storm will be a lot better for your game and will dramatically decrease your chances of being injured as opposed to the Pure Drive.

  • #1065
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Prince Spectrum Comp must be very old, sorry but I cannot even find the specs on this one. I am sure you could only benefit by trying some of the racquets in my top 10 arm friendly racquet list http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquet

  • #1064
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Babolat APD is definitely one of the worst offenders for causing arm problems. The Prince EX03 Warrier and Yonex ai100 are both a lot better however some of the new prince racquets are even better such as the PRINCE Tour 100 16X18 Tennis Racquet or the PRINCE Tour Pro 98 Tennis Racquet but I understand that they are a bit pricier at this time

  • #1063

    Dalius

    I am beginner – intermediate player. Many thanks for this nice web with explanatory information.
    I do not have Elbow problem yet, but would like to go for Pure storm GT LTD. At the moment I am using Pure drive 300g, 320 mm balance. My question is – why in most reviews Pure storm GT LTD is pointed as “for experts only” – how can my (beginner-intermediate player) game harm with this racket – too little swing weight? Why most reviews stress our that for beginners – lighter, head heavy or neutral balance rackets only. Is to gain more swing weight and power? Please explain – I need last push to order this Pure storm LTD “miracle” – I have no chance to try it in court before ordering. Thank you.

  • #1062

    Kevin

    I am a 50 year old, and played scholarship collegiate tennis. I am using a Prince Spectrum Comp 110. I am happy with it’s performance but am concerned about some arm pain, that may or may not be caused from tennis? I am using Black Widow string, Dunlop I think, strung at 70lbs. I have tried looser string, but really do not like it, loosing lots of control with the trampoline effect. I would be interested to know where this racquet and string fall on the arm friendly scale? I have recently begun playing more frequently and am hitting the ball harder with more control than I ever have, and don’t want to invest in a couple new racquets, but may consider it if this is the cause for my arm issue?

  • #1061

    Pete P

    I discovered your site while researching my new TE issue which begin after buying an AeroPro Drive GT. for the first time in my life, my arm has been hurting. I’m quickly getting rid of the APD before my pain gets any worse.

    Wondered what you thought or Prince EXO3 Warrior? Now on sale, which always helps.

    Also curious about Yonex ai100.

    Thanks much!

  • #1060
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The racquets that you used before switching to the Babolat Aeropro Drive were much better choices so I can understand why you are now having problems. The three choices you are considering are all excellent. I would especially consider the Prestige or possibly the Storm, I am sure you can handle the weight based on what you are used to there is no reason to go to the lighter Radical

  • #1059

    Barry

    Hi Thomas. Great site.

    Wondering if you can help me choose my next racquet. I’m a recreational player now but played competitive college tennis here in our country equivalent to NCAA in the US. I selected my racquets before based on weight and maneuverability, but nothing more. Started with a Price Michael Chang then changed to Slazenger Pro Braided then finally to a Dunlop Muscle Weave 200g. I’ve had occasions of tennis elbow especially if I played everyday (which is no longer the case since I just play occasionally now). After looking at your site and reading the comments, I’ve had to rethink about my Aero Pro Drive choice. Which among these 3 options do you think is the best racquet I can transition to (considering my previous racquets)? 1) Pure Storm Tour GT 2) Head Youtek IG Radical MP 3) Head Youtek IG Prestige Pro. Unfortunately, these are the only ones from your list that are available here. Appreciate the help!

  • #1058
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Yes I agree the specs are arm friendly, the only problem is it is a discontinued racquet so if you are able to find one you will never know how long or where it has been stored.

  • #1057
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Head Prestige S would be a preety good choice with your condition since it is not too heavy while at the same time it has the other arm friendly characteristics. As far as lower the string tension that definity could help.

  • #1056
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Usually a two handed helps make it easier on your main arm. Now that you switched to a one handed backhand your main arm will have more stress which makes it more important for you to use a arm friendly racquet. If you are not sure where to start your search I would suggest my top 10 list http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennisracquet

  • #1055
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I can only find this racquet in Europe. It would rate it average in terms of arm friendly. It has all the arm friendly racquets but its stiffness is average and I would prefer a more flexible frame.

  • #1054

    Mynell

    “Your comment is awaiting moderation.”

    Thomas, have you had a chance to review my posts? Awating your feedback.

    Thanks Mike

  • #1053

    richard

    hello what is your opinion on the yonex rdis 200 320gms version . it has all the arm friendly specs to my opinion. thanks for your site! .

  • #1052

    Mynell

    Thomas, can you comment on the new Prince White LS 100 racquet? When I fill out the new form on Prince’s website, this raqcquest fits my criteria and keeps coming up. Would you consider it an “arm Friendly” choice? Your help is greatly appreciated!

  • #1051

    Sam

    Hello Thomas,
    I used to play with babolat pd roddick plus for years with 2hbh, however, several days ago, after some miss-shots in 2hbh during a match, the shock that from the racket has heavily injured my left arm and I have to start a new life with 1hbh,are there any racquets suggested for me from 1hbh beginner to advanced that arm friendly? Any advice is greatly appreciated.

  • #1050
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Babolat Pure Storm Team and the Head Grapene Radical are both huge improvements over the Babolat Aeropro Drive and will definetly help your arm, Both are a bit light to be consider top flight arm friendly racquets like the HEAD Youtek IG Prestige Mid and the Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT If you can handle one of those racquets you would benefit even more.

  • #1049

    frederic

    hello thomas
    Like you said the aeropro drive causes a lot of shoulder, elbow or wrist problems.I like the babolat pure storm team gt,do you think it’s too light ? because i felt pretty good with it.I also tried the head grapheme radical mp which was good but the head size which is a little bit smaller seems to be an issue for me. which one would you suggest ? can my shoulder and wrist get better with the storm team?
    thanks

  • #1048

    Mynell

    Thomas, currently using a Prince DB 26 Mid Plus circa 1984. Have golfers arm problems mostly from bad technique. Have made a concerted effort over the last 6 months to revamp strokes and hitting much better. I want to upgrade to a newer racquet. Have always used more flexible frames but would like to add a little power as well. I like Prince but would be open to other suggestions. Please advise what you would reccommend. I have switched from the “pendulum 1970’s ” swing with the continental grip to the modern forehand with slightly Eastern +. Huge difference and its starting to pay off. I am a 4.0…Any help is greaqtly appreciated!

  • #1047

    Guy Newport

    I use to be a competitive player but stopped playing for 25+ years. I am now getting back into it, but only playing about 3 times a month. For the first time I am experiencing tennis elbow. I know I need to switch racquets and the following were recommended. Babolat Pure Drive GT, Wilson Juice 100, Prince Warrior 100, Babolat Aeropro Drive, Head Speed M/P. Do you have any recommendations as to which of these might be best? Thanks.

  • #1046

    Melissa

    Hi Thomas,
    Thank you so very much for your website and for answering questions! I am so grateful that such a knowledgeable person would make themselves available to us laymen!!
    I am in my late 30’s, have played tennis all my life, and I am a 4.0 player. I have played with my Head Prestige Classic 600 for the last 15+ years! I love the 93 size head and solid feel, in my opinion it is the best racquet ever made! 🙂 I have played tennis all my life up until about a year and a half ago secondary to a rotator cuff tear (supraspinatus muscle). I had reparative surgery 11 months ago and have been cleared to resume play. I went to Tennis Express looking for a new racquet believing that my old racquet was too heavy for my still weak and atrophied arm muscles. I purchased (on the advice of the sales person, who was very nice and seemed knowledgeable, but said there were no demos b/c it was being discontinued so I couldn’t try it out) a Head Prestige S. He strung it with some Prince poly 16 gauge string at 55lbs and I took it out to the court for the first time in over 18 months. My shoulder hurt immediately after playing for about 10 min. I am wondering if you think I made a mistake on the racquet purchase or the stringing? Do you think synthetic or natural gut strung at 48 or 50 would help?

    Thank you in advance for all the wonderful advice you have posted!
    Melissa

  • #1045
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Head Prestige Mid could help you since it has some more mass and more of a head light balance. It would be worth a try.

  • #1044

    Cem S

    Hi Thomas,
    I would like to switch from The Head Prestige S to Head Prestige Mid. Would it be an improvement, or unnecessary? What is your advice? Thank you

  • #1043
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Most Babolat racquets are not arm friendly with the exception of the Pure Storm. I looked at all of the racquets that you mentioned and by far the most arm friendly is the Babolat New Purestorm Limited GT, the next best would be the Head Youtek IG Radical OS

  • #1042

    Jenn

    Hi I’m looking for a new racquet…I just started playing again a year ago after a 15yr hiatus…I played w a Wilson pro staff 5.8 and never had arm problems…I’m a 3.0/3.5 doubles player who is aggressive at the net…I play on a 3.0 & 3.5 USTA team and play 3-4 days a week…I demoed a few Babolats and my arm was whacked…I am looking at: Head Youtek IG Radical OS, Prince Premier 105 ESP, Volkl Organix 6, Volkl Organix 8-315, & the Babolat New Purestorm Limited GT…I’m tall and can handle the heavier racquets…thank you!

  • #1041
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I don’t think older racquets loss their flex but they can loss power and feel. The Head Prestige Mid and MIDplus are both excellent arm friendly racquets, I only placed the Mid above the Midplus because it has significantly more weight – also it is very similar in specs to you Prince spectrum comp. I also like the prince EX03 and the Prince Tour ESP which is a lighter racquet and you might want to try that with some lead tape, you also might want to take a look at the Prince Rebel. I also noticed that the Prince comp has a very open string pattern 14 x 18 the Prince Tour ESP is 16 x 16 one of the most open string patterns in modern racquets. The Head racquets you mentioned are 18 x 20 which would make it more difficult to generate the spin you are used to with the open string patterns

  • #1040

    Tyler

    I have been suffering from tennis elbow for about two years now. I use some really old sticks, Prince spectrum comp 90. The specs fall into the arm friendly catagory being 12.3 oz 63 flex rating and 6 points headlight. I guess what my question is that my racquets being that old can they lose thier flex? I use prince syn gut with duraflex strung at 57. I have demoed many many racquets but I can’t find one that I feel quite as dialed in with as my spectrums. If I have to switch racquets just wondering why the head prestige mid is rated lower on the arm friendly scale then its midplus brother. Also considering the new prince graphite 100 even though I have not hit with one yet or the prince exo3 graphite mid (I am a prince guy). I tried the new prince tour esp but it was a little light for me. Do sting patterns factor into the equation when looking for arm friendly racquets. Ok I am rambling now, Thank you so much for your forum it is very helpful and am looking forward to your response.

  • #1039
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    It is a very light racquet and could be bad for your arm since there is so little mass to absorb any of shock.

  • #1038

    Paul Artard

    Hi Thomas. What do you think of the Head Protector racquet ?

  • #1037
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    None of these are arm friendly as they have moderate stiffness Definity stay away from the S since that is even stiffer and lighter than the other two.

  • #1036

    Paulo

    Hi Thomas,
    What do you think about the new Head Graphene Speed family (PRO, MP and S). Are they arm frendly? Do you recommend any of them? Thank you.

  • #1035
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The 3 racquets that you are looking at Head graphene radical MP, Head youtek IG radical MP and the Head youtek Instinct are all good solid arm friendly racquets they are not top arm friendly racquets because they are a little too light. They are so close it is difficult to say which is best of the three, so if you have narrowed your search to these three I would go with the one that feels best for you/

  • #1034
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I use a combination of sites including the manufactures but I lean towards tennisexpress because that is where my links are directed and they are a sponsor of my website, The Technifibre Tfight 315 LTD is a great racquet and at one time I had it in my top 10 list.

  • #1033

    Alan

    Thank you Thomas. Just a few more questions for you.

    1. When you are looking up racquet specs you seem to have a preference for Tennis Express. Is there a specific reason you don’t use the ones given by Tennis Warehouse?

    2. What is your opinion of the Technifibre Tfight 315 LTD series? It comes in both 16×19 and 18×20 string patterns.

    Thanks for your input.

    Regards,
    Alan

  • #1032
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Yonex EZONE Xi 98 is far from an arm friendly racquet although it is better than the AeroPro Drive GT 2012. The Prince Premier Attack (16G) is a good soft arm friendly string. Improper grip size can also contribute to arm problems I am not sure if too small or too big is worse but both are bad.

  • #1031

    Alan

    Thomas,

    I’d like to express my appreciation for the great website and advice. I’ve recently been suffering what seems to be the beginning stages of TE, from a combination of the AeroPro Drive GT 2012 (surprise, surprise!), dead polyester strings (this was my first time with poly), and poor technique (probably tired after whole weekend of play, and because the APD is so easy to hit with I wasn’t swinging properly near the end). I talked to some people and ended up changing racquets.

    Recently I demoed a Yonex EZONE Xi 98 and found the racquet to feel great, with characteristics (pattern, beam shape) outside of stiffness and weight, to be very similar to the APD. I’ve been hitting with it for several weeks now and it’s surprisingly been an experience in game improvement. I’ve been improving my technique steadily and the spin and power has come back, even if the frame itself is not as “designed” for it as the APD. Link below for your reference.

    http://www.tennisexpress.com/YONEX-EZONE-Xi-98-Tennis-Racquet-26456

    I wanted to know your opinion of this racquet, as well as two multifilament strings: the Head RIP Control (17G) and the Prince Premier Attack (16G).

    I also have one more question – what are your thoughts about grip size? I’ve heard that improper grip size, mainly grips that are too large, exacerbate the existing problems of stiff frames and stiff strings. I’d been using a 4 1/4 (L2) previously and recently switched to 4 3/8 (L3) and found it much more comfortable. How much does a difference does grip size make?

    Thank you for your responses.

    – Alan

  • #1030
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Prince Response is too stiff, and the Volkl V1 is too light but the Prince Graphite 100 and the Dunlop Muscle weave are worth a look Also the DUNLOP Biomimetic Max 200G is one of my top 10 arm friendly racquets

  • #1029

    Chris

    I’m considering purchasing one of the Classic Reissued Racquets. The four under consideration are the Prince Response, The Prince Classic Graphite 100, The Volkl V1 and the Dunlop Muscle Weave. I’ve tried many of the newer technology frames and they have left me wanting. I developed moderate to severe TE while using the Babolat racquets (Nadal’s Black and Yellow) and it was exacerbated by using a Head Microgel racquet. I’ve also had to return to the 4 3/8 grip size as I think the 4 1/2 wasn’t doing me any favors. I’m also considering stringing at 50 lbs versus the 60-65 tension I have used with synthetic guts. Any suggestions?

  • #1028
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The long term impact of using the Prince Warrior ESP 100 would not be good as it is very stiff. A racquet that is similiar but much more arm friendly is the PRINCE Tour 100T ESP

  • #1027

    Connie

    I’m demoing the new Prince Warrior ESP 100 and so far love it. Your thoughts on its longer term impact with elbow issues?

  • #1026

    FiFi

    Is Head graphene radical MP an arm friendly than Head youtek IG radical MP? They seem almost identical but the string patterns are different and Graphene is just little lighter and little bit more head light.
    I’m switching from Head youtek Instinct s (head heavy) to an arm friendly Head rkt.
    Thank you for your help!

  • #1025

    Cem Soydemir

    Thank you very much for your answer. But it is not possible here to find both limited version (Pure Storm and TFight 315). I could not also find the Prince EX03 Tour (checked the distributor website). So may i customize my prestige s by adding some weight around the grip to change the head light balance. Is it useful? Or should i continue to look for another more flexible racquet. Thank you again.

  • #1024

    Rubie Ganns

    Hi, I have been playing Head Ti S6 for 5 years. Am currently a 3.5 player who plays 5-6 times per week. I got tennis elbow for 6 weeks now, and so far still not getting any better…… But I am hopeful and thinking to switch to Head Radical MicroGel (either the regular size or the over size). Can you say something about them? I recall you said it might be helpful to put some tape. Where would you put the tape?

    Thanks!

  • #1023

    Rubie Ganns

    Where would you put the tape? On the head at 9, 12 or 3 o’clock? Will that make the head heavy?

  • #1022

    Virginia

    Hello, I have a question for my 11 year old daughter. I want to go the preventative route and make sure she never develops arm problems. These racquets are obviously too large for her. Do you have a lighter (but full size adult) racquet that you would recommend to growing children? Thanks.

  • #1021

    Cem Soydemir

    Thank you very much for your answer. But it is not possible here to find both limited version (Pure Storm and TFight 315). I could not also find the Prince EX03 Tour (checked the distributor website). So may i customize my prestige s by adding some weight around the grip to change the head light balance. Is it useful? Or should i continue to look for another more flexible racquet. Thank you again.

  • #1020
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Yes I would recommend the BABOLAT New Pure Storm Limited GT Tennis Racquet as a top arm friendly racquet I would also recommend the Tecnifibre TFight 315 Ltd, but the racquet you are currently using the Head Youtek ig Prestige S is almost as arm friendly. Maybe you need something a lot more flexible like the Prince EX03 Tour.

  • #1019
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Great question! Essentially elbow, shoulder and wrist pain are caused by force and torque being absorbed and transfered to your arm through your racquet. A stiffer frame absorbs less of the force because the dwell time is reduced, stiff frames result in shorter dwell time, thus higher Torque. A lighter racquet has less momentum and thus absorbs less impact forcing your arm to absorb more impact. So the most essential characteristics of an arm friendly racquet are heavy and flexible, along with a head light balance. All the frames recommended on http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets have all these characteristics at a minimum.

  • #1018
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Interesting question! As an 11 year old unless balls are being hit to her very hard and she is playing at a very high level, then she could use a lighter racquet without arm problems so I would look for a racquet a bit lighter with a low swingweight than typical arm friendly racquets with all the other charactertistics of arm friendly racquets, particulary important would be to stick wth high flexibility. A racquet like this is not easy to find but I found a few that are readily available – these include the Pacific X Force Lite, the Prince EXO3 Tour Lite 100 and the Head YOUTEK Graphene Instinct Rev

  • #1017

    Cem Soydemir

    Hi from Turkey. May I ask a question? Will you also advice Babolat Pure Storm GT (not the Ltd. version)? I have two racquets. One is Head Youtek ig Prestige S (after using it app. for 3 months with poly strings @ 55, I had a tennis elbow. Then I changed the strings with multifilament softer ones at a lower tension. And some ice treatment, excercises and rest, my TE is gone. Then I bought another racquet Head Graphene Instinct MP. My forearm started to sore again. I needed a lighter racquet(and a powerful one especially for serves, and I thought that I have pain on my forearm after 2 hours playing, and decided that it is because my prestige s is heavy for me) and that’s why bought the Instinct. But it seems that it gave me some pain again. I am thinking about Babolat for my new racquet of choice. On your list, I see BABOLAT New Pure Storm Limited GT but here in Turkey I couldn’t find that racquet. What is your advice on Pure Storm GT. And also what is your opinion about technifibre racquets. Can I find among them an armfriendl model. Thank you very much for your concern.

  • #1016

    Virginia

    My daughter is 11 and I would like to get an adult sized racquet for her. She is still small but I feel she has outgrown the junior racquets. What do you recommend for junior players who want an adult sized racquet without it being too heavy and overwhelming, at the same time being tennis arm friendly?

  • #1015

    Steve

    Hi, thanks for this website! I am currently suffering from wrist and occasionally shoulder pain (a previous injury) but no tennis elbow after ramping up to playing tennis 3-4 times a week. I started with a Babolat z-drive tour and recently upgraded to an Aero Pro Drive which I like but immediately identified that it caused more and different pain. Hence, your website to the rescue. Does your advice re racquets that avoid tennis elbow similarly apply to wrist and shoulder or there are there any subtleties I should consider? Many thanks.

  • #1014
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I really like the PACIFIC X Feel Pro 95 the ones you mention maybe good but they are hard to find and there is not much info available on them

  • #1013
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Your lucky you have not developed arm problems with those racquets they are all bad for your arm and difficult to control. If you consider the racquets from http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets/ you will greatly reduce your exposure to arm problems and increase your control, you will not increase power but with elastic strings at a low tension you can get a lot of power back

  • #1012
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Babolat Aeropro TEAM is only very slightly better than the 2013 Babolat Aeorpro Drive which is one of the worst racquets on the market for your arm. The 2012 Wilson Prostaff BLX 100 would be a lot better than those racquets. Wilson Juice would be alright if you use the one with the smaller 96in head size because it is heavier with a more flexible frame, you also might want to consider the Babolat Pure Storm

  • #1011
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I don’t think you will be getting to that many more balls with a larger frame if you could get to a lot more balls with a larger frame all of the pros would be using larger frames. I would suggest you consider the racquets from http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets/

  • #1010

    Víctor Doallo

    After several elbow problems playing regullarly with Babolat Pure Drive, I found your blog some time ago. I swaped to a Prince eox3 tour 100 and I have to say that I have noticed a real improve in my elbow problems that simple hace desapeared. During the last three months I hace been playing regullarly with the Prince and I really feel much better. Thus, I would like to sincere thank Thomas for all the information given in this blog. Almost everyone in my club has a look to it now. Thanks a lot. Víctor Doallo, Real Sociedad de Tenis Pompeia, Barcelona, Spain.

  • #1009
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    That would be a huge improvement since the Head Ti S6 is awful for your arm and the Yonex RDis 200 Light is an arm friendly racquet.

  • #1008

    Rajesh

    i am developing a tennis elbow, thinking to switch from Head Ti S6 to Yonex RDiS 200 LIGHT Tennis Racquet…your thoughts please ??

    Cna you please throw some light on this ?

  • #1007
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I think it is a small factor that helps the racquet play more flexible, but a much bigger factor is the flexibility of the frame itself. The less dense string pattern also makes it easier to impart more spin on your shots. Interestingly Prince has a new line of racquets ESP for extreme spin potential all 16×16 string patterns. I am particularly interested in the Prince Tour 98 ESP as the specs are quite arm-friendly.

  • #1006

    Nic

    Hi, love your website! My coach says that I should not use a denser string pattern like 18×20 since it puts more strain on my elbow. He recommends 16X18 or 16×19. What is your thoughts on this?

  • #1005

    Alex Korea

    Hello from Seoul, S.Korea. Fantastic site and very informative.
    I used to play quite a bit in my middle school days and have started again after ~15 yrs. I had been using a Wilson Prostaff One 95 from a few yrs ago and its seems to be arm friendly, but lacks a bit of power (can use all the help i can get).

    Recently purchased a 2013 Babolat Aeorpro Drive (RPM blast @ 55) and i admit, got pulled in by Nadal’s endorsement and the flashy graphics. However, it’s simply too stiff for me.

    QSTNS:
    1.) Given Babolat racquets now uses ‘Cortex’, would the 2013 Babolat
    Aeropro TEAM be a better fit/option for me?
    2.) What are your thots on the 2012 Wilson Prostaff BLX 100 (i’m
    reading it lacks power) or Wilson Juice (as i’ve had some success
    with an older Prostaff already)

    Your thots appreciated, Alex

  • #1004

    jan

    have played with a Wilson for a very long time. I just cracked my last Wilson. I started out with the hyper hammer 2.0 head size 115, when this racquet was no longer available I played with the Wilson k three head size 115. I am now demo Wilson BLX three head size 117. This racquet seems maybe a bit much for me to control. I am a USTA 4.0 tennis player. I play 5 to 6 days a week. Any suggestions as what racquet I should progress to. I need what every one wishes. Control, arm friendly and power.

  • #1003
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Babolot APD is one of the worst racquets on the market for tennis elbow, the Head Youtek Graphene Instinct MP is slightly better but not much better, the Dunlop Biomemetic 6.0 and the Wilsom Five BLX are both very arm friendly. You are going to need to sacrifice power for a racquet that is more arm friendly and has more control and feel you can get back some power with elastic strins and low tension

  • #1002

    ron

    my wife is demo-ing the Head Youtek Graphene Instinct MP . would you consider this an arm-friendly racquet? I see a lot of Head racquets on your list, but not specifically the Instinct. she will also be demo-ing the Dunlop Biomemetic 6.0 and the Wilsom Five BLX–do you consider those two arm friendly? She is small size (5.0, 100 lbs) and want to feel similar “power” like she did when she used the Babolot APD.

  • #1001
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Yonex exonerated xi is a bad raquet for your arm too stiff and light the Dunlop Aerogel 1 hundred was a good arm friendly racquet but is out of production. I would refer you to my top 10 list and suggest you try one of those.

  • #1000
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I never heard of a smaller or larger grip being good or bad. But the wrong size grip either too large or too small could cause problems

  • #999

    Virginia

    Thanks! I will check it out. Also, does grip size have anything to do with elbow/arm pain? I used to play with a 4 3/8, but I do have smaller hands and moved down to a 4 1/8 (double overgrip it). I developed the tennis elbow using the double-gripped 4 1/8. I thought it might be grip size so I was planning to move to a 4 1/4. What are your thoughts on grip size?

  • #998

    Louise

    Hi Thomas

    I play tennis 6 a 8 hrs a week doubles with local competitons …. Love the game
    I have golfers elbow, and not from golf or tennis for 6months now.. tried to play tennis 4-5 times still hurts… Rotation of the arm is the issue … Last I played tennis I felt maybe my rocket is too top heavy.. Not sure.
    I play now with Yonix exonerated xi 107 (isometric) previous was the Dunlop aerogel hundred….
    I want to return badly very soon and wondering if I should change my racket….

    Please advise
    Thanks a million…
    Louise

  • #997
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    You can try the Head YOUTEK Radical MP, it has all the other criteria of an arm friendly racquet but is only 11oz strung.

  • #996

    Virginia

    Need some advice! I have been perusing your site and other websites for tennis elbow friendly racquets. I am a female 4.0 player who is on the petite side. I have been told that most of these racquets you recommended to me are way too heavy and are for 5+ larger male players. Is this true, and if so, can you please recommend to me a good racquet for a petite female player that isn’t as heavy (low 11.0 oz strung) but meets all your other criteria? I am just coming back to tennis after four months of rest and physical therapy and want to make sure I get the right equipment! I was previously using a Wilson Juice 100. Thanks!!!

  • #995

    Lew

    Hi Thomas – I just got back into tennis after 6 year layoff. I’m 58 but have played the since I was 13. Now a 3.5 level player but can hang with players 20 years younger. Good control player, one-handed backhand, good top spin, not a lot of power. Always have had arm issues. Playing with Prince Scream 110 from 6 years ago and arm is killing me. Like the bigger frame because I’m not as fast as I used to be. Any suggestions? Thanks!

  • #994

    JAVIER

    Sorry Thomas, and what about YONEX V CORE 98 D ?

  • #993

    Rajesh

    i am developing a tennis elbow, thinking to switch from Head Ti S6 to Yonex RDiS 200 LIGHT Tennis Racquet…your thoughts please ??

  • #992

    JAVIER

    Hi Thomas

    Sorry if my English is not so good.
    What arm friendly are PRINCE EXO 3 REBEL 98 and HEAD YOUTEK IG SPEED 300 ? Thank you for your comments.

  • #991
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I agree with you she needs to get used to a more arm friendly racquet the babolat Aero Pro Drive is one of the worst. I’ve seem more complaints about arm problems from users of that racquet than any.

  • #990

    Pat

    What do you think of the following as far as elbow-friendly goes:

    PK Black Ace 98
    PK Redondo 98
    PK Q Tour

    Cheers 🙂

  • #989

    ron

    So my wife has a a bad case of tennis elbow and is reluctant to stop playing. She is currently using a 2010 babolat Aero Pro Drive and she likes it a lot. I recently got 4 demos from your list and she doesn’t like any of them. the grip size on all of the racquets were 4 and 3/8 which is too big for her. Secondly, they are all heavier than her current racquet. She tried the Prince tour, Babolat, Dunlop, and wilson. @ of the racquets had leather grips and i think that also affected her decision. I have told her that I don’t want to hear anymore about the elbow if she is not going to try a more arm friendly racquet. What is your take on her current racquet. I know the weight is 11.1 and the rdc is a 74 both of these are less of an arm friendly racquet.

  • #988
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Wilson Hammer Racquets are really bad for your arm in large part because of their head heavy balance, you need to switch to a racquet with a head light balance even if it is heavier than your racquet it you will be able to swing it easier and quicker.

  • #987

    Laurie

    Hi I have been very stubborn about changing racquets and have been using Wilson 6.4 Hammer 95 racquets for years. I am a female, 4.0 player, with lots of top spin. I have been battling tennis elbow now for over a year and now believe it is the racquets. I was wondering if your listed weights for arm friendly racquets were geared more for male players, or does this not matter? I am looking for a comparable feel to my trusty old racquets but need something elbow friendly. Any advice is greatly appreciated.

  • #986
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Volkl Organix V1 MidPlus is a lot better for your arm than any 8 oz racquet. You can try it and if you get any arm problems try looking at one of our top 10’s http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets

  • #985
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Your club pro is clearly not knowledgeable on this subject. I do not see why lower level players should be using less arm friendly racquets especially when lower level players tend to be most vulnerable to tennis elbow.

  • #984
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Pro Kennex 5g racquet has good power for a arm friendly racquet, for more power you need to look into changing string and lowering string tension, Also you might want to look into a new racquet as its possible that your racquet lost some power over time. You might want to try the Pro Kennex Kinetic KI5 315

  • #983

    Abi

    Hi I have just bought a EX03 Tour 100 16 x 18 racquet due to my persistent TE; however I am fairly new to the game and my club coach says that this racquet is for the advanced player and that club pro’s wouldn’t even use such a high spec racquet. I am a little confused as to this response!! On the subject of stringing, what would you recommend in terms of the string type and tension in order to achieve both maximum comfort and power?

  • #982

    Steve

    I am currently playing with some Pro Kennex 5g rackets (years ago they were listed as a great racket for sufferers of TE), and my tennis elbow disappeared with these rackets. They don’t possess a lot of power… What would you recommend as step up from the pro kennex 5g in the power department, but still maintain some flexibility to prevent TE????

  • #981

    Michele

    Thank you for a great site. I haven’t been playing long, only about 8 months, but I’ve been looking at purchasing a new racquet. I’ve demoed a couple – Volkl Organix V1 MidPlus and a Head (forgot the name but it was under 8 oz). I loved the way the Volkl hit and found that I had to concentrate on my strokes instead of just being slap-happy with the very lightweight Head. Originally I thought the Volkl was too heavy for me but in reading your site, it may be the lighter racquets are causing the tennis elbow issues. What are your thoughts on the V1 MidPlus and do you have a string recommendation to help ease the pain? I have pretty decent power but would love more spin.

  • #980

    Craig

    Hi great site
    what do you think about the Wilson pro staff 6.0 85sq in?
    thank you

  • #979

    Rod P.

    What about ProKennex raquets? They claim to be arm frendly and even cure TE. Hello form Cananda!!!

  • #978
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Yes the Wilson Six.One Team BLX would be decent for te due to its flexible frame but it is a bit on the light side to be a top arm-friendly racquet. The Wilson Pro Staff 95 BLX would be a little better as it is slightly more flexible and heavier.

  • #977
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Prince Exo 3 rebel team would be a good choice since it is so flexible, but it is a bit on the light side to be a top arm friendly racquet, heavier racquets are better for your arm. But if you feel comfortable with the Prince Exo 3 rebel and you have not had arm trouble with it then it could be the right choice for you.

  • #976

    Aleš

    Hi, great site. This are all very heavy racquets you suggest. I have Babolat pure drive, huge problems with my elbow. I think I also need a lighter racquet, what do you recommend in 280g – 290g region. Maybe Prince Exo 3 rebel team with 280g? Thank you in advance.

  • #975

    Tan

    Hi is the Wilson Six.One Team BLX decent for the TE? Wd it be OK in comparision with the WIlson ProStaff you have listed? many thanks for a wonderful website and resource.

    Thaks

  • #974
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    If you mean the Wilson Prostaff Six.One BLX (95) then yes that is one of my top 10.

  • #973
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Prince Tour Graphite Classic Original is arm friendly the other prince graphite originals are pretty average.

  • #972

    Dee

    Hi — thank you for great suggestions. Would you recommend Wison BLX 5 for tennis elbow?

  • #971

    Tim

    do you think the prince graphite original would be an arm friendly choice? thank you

  • #970
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Prince Rebel has a low swingweight which makes it feel lighter than its actual weight. If you used the Prince EX03 tour it had a 16 x 18 string pattern which is great for spin. I never heard of any problems with cracking with these racquets.

  • #969

    Andy

    I have a Babolat psgt. Dont use anymore. Good racket but small sweet spot and if hit outside of it hard on arm. My Prince ex03 tour 100 never hard on arm even with miss hits let alone just missing the sweet spot. Had a go with prince rebel 95 on Tuesday. It was strung with prince Duraflex and I prefer it to the tour 100. It feels alot lighter than its weight and its the the first 18×20 racket I have ever used.
    I am now looking at the Rebel or the Pure storm ltd 95. Also new rackets from Prince and babolat coming out soon. Have been told that rebel 95 cracks at throat, have you heard of this.

  • #968

    Andy

    I purchased Ex03 Tour 100 16×18 because I got tennis elbow. Caused by using my Babolat Psgt ( small sweet spot ) with full bed of Luxilon Savage . Tour 100 is heavy, head light but has low swingweight. I string myself and have tried different strings and tension. At the momement got Babolat vs team 17g in mains ( 60lbs ) and Yonex Poly Tour Spin in crosses at 58 lbs. Very good strings hardly move.
    Also have the team 100 which I have strung full bed of the Yonex at 50lbs. Can feel the the decrease of weight in Team 100 but prefer Tour. I now want to get the 18×20 Tour which has same flex rating as Tour 16×18. The Tour 100 is really worth a demo but it will feel different so give it time.

  • #967

    Ebyrd

    Great info on here !! I used to play with the Prince 03 speed port red and never had any tennis elbow or golfers elbow pain. I recently switched to the babolat pure drive lite. Now I have been having golfer’s elbow. I didn’t want it to be the racket switch but looks like it is ? Your thoughts appreciated.

  • #966

    Will

    I’m am 13 and wondering if the prestige mp is a good choice for me I will be using Wilson sensation crosses and big banger mains what would u recommend

  • #965
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Sounds good If you still have problems try one from the top 10 list with a even lower flex

  • #964

    W. A. Love

    I’ve been playing off and on since the 40’s.(I’m 79 and not in a wheel chair)I’m just coming back after a 12 year lay off. 35 years ago I had cortisone injections(worked for about 6 weeks) and surgery.(didn’t work at all)Finally worked out a program with weights that cured the elbow. Now I’m trying to come back and the exercises aren’t working. I’m using the Prince Thunderstik 90 that I was using when I quit.I love the racket but it’s to stiff.I’ve reached an age where I need a soft stick with pop.What do you think of the Head Youtek IG Radical Pro which has a stiffness of 62, a 98″ head and weighs 11.4 oz.It’s power figures are good. I would probably add 3/8 oz’s of lead in the handle. I’m using a good multi at 50. What do you think?

    .

  • #963
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Good racquet. There are a number of Pacific Xforce. I would favor the PACIFIC X Feel Pro 95 the others might not be so arm-friendly

  • #962
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I would not change my list for an intermediate. These are the most arm friendly racquets for any player and I would think an intermediate player would want to avoid tennis elbow as much as any advanced player. Breaking down racquets into intermediate categories mostly a marketing ploy

  • #961
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    On the previous post you mention, the women was looking for an arm friendly racquet that is easy to handle so I mentioned the Prince Rebel because of its low swing weight, but I like the feel of the Prince EX03 16×18 because I like the feel and spin it generates so I can’t say which is better for you only that either one would be a great choice

  • #960

    Tina

    I am getting back to playing tennis after elbow surgery 2 1/2 years ago (am age 47, female, and play at 3.0 level). I read that your favorite racquet is the Prince EXO3 100 16×18 and also read a reply you wrote to a woman with a similar situation as me and you recommended the Prince EXO3 Rebel 95. Which would be a better racquet and string for me?

  • #959

    Vitaly

    Greetings from Latvia! I came across your site after experiencing severe pain in shoulder/elbow area especially when serving. The pain completely goes away after about 30 minutes rest. I suspect it is what is called tennis elbow problem. I play with Babolat Pure Drive after nearly 25 years break. Now I look for an arm friendly racket and notice that all rackets you mention here are for an advanced player which I am not. So if you add another variable like suitability for an intermediate player, how would you rank those 10 rackets or probably add some others to the list? Than you very much!

  • #958

    ruben

    What do you think of PACIFIC X FORCE? A good friend of mine can get me a great deal but you dont include it in your list so that makes me doubt.

    Thanks a lot for your great website

  • #957

    Ruben

    Hi from Spain and thanks for your wonderful website

    One quick question. I am struggling with tennis elbow and a good friend of mine offers me a great deal for 3 PACIFIC X FORCE that he says are great for elbow.

    What do you think? Its not in your top 10 and that makes me doubt.

  • #956
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I glad that I was helpful, I am confident that combination of racquet and string will help. The only other suggestion is that if you are still having any problems try reducing your string tension

  • #955

    Rick

    Thanks Thomas–before getting your reply, I did a lot of research and bought a Prince EXO Tour (100) 18×20. I’ve read mixed reviews on whether the 16×18 or 18×20 is better for topspin, feel, etc. Very confusing to read mixed reviews between the two–but all reviews praise the feel. I went with Babolat VS natural gut strings, at 58lbs. I’m assuming that will be as good as it gets for my arm, and I’ll adjust to the racket as need be. Let me know if you have further suggestions on string/lbs with the 18×20 for a 4.0-4.5 topspin baseliner. I was worried I might have to quit tennis–but I’m hoping this set-up will save me.

  • #954
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Hard to say, they are both great racquets for your arm. You should try both , most people would find the Dunlop Biomimetic 200 easier to use and get used to.

  • #953
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I think you would benefit from a switch in racquets, if you stick with the Prince Ex03 line you could look at the Prince EX03 Tour 16 x 18, which is a lot more flexible, more weight and has excellent all around ratings.

  • #952
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Wilson Steam 105S would be pretty bad for your arm due to mainly to its high stiffness and fairly lightweight. The best arm friendly racquet I know that is also great for spin is the Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16 x 18

  • #951

    Rick

    Great website! I just started playing regularly again after many years. Bought a Wilson Steam 105S, use Black Widow strings, at 60 lbs of pressure. I hit amazing topspin with this set-up, and my kick-serve really kicks. Unfortunately, I’m developing golf and tennis elbow. Two questions — How bad is my current set-up? (In other words, using your rating system, how bad is this?) I’m hoping my set-up is really bad for TE, since, if so, switching my set-up could be a quick-fix (in addition to what my physical therapist tells me to do). Second question — what combination of racket/string/lbs would you recommend for a 4.0-4.5 baseliner who loves spin? I don’t want to lose the spin!

  • #950

    Joe McCas

    Hi, great website. I have been struggling with tennis elbow for months even after going to an orthopedist, wearing a brace and getting cortisone shots. I currently play with the Prince EXO3 Warrior 100 and I was wondering your thoughts on that racket. Do you think a switch to one of the rackets you have listed would provide much benefit? I am currently a solid 3.5/decent 4.0 player.

  • #949

    leon

    Hi Thomas, thanks for the prompt reply…you’re doing a great job. One more query bettween the dunlop biomimetic 200 and 200 tour(slightly heavier at 12.6oz strung wt) which one do you recommend… i know heavier rackets are better at absorbing the shock…so help me please …thanx.

  • #948

    Tim

    I am back to playing tennis at a frequency of 2 to 3x per week for the last 2 months after a 10+ yr hiatus. I’m in my 30s and 4.5 rated. I’m using the Extreme Pro 2.0 strung with Yonex poly tour pro 125 at 46 lbs. I do not have tennis elbow issues but I am feeling soreness in my triceps and biceps n back of my shoulders.

    My question is whether it is racket related or normal aches from the lack of tennis? I don’t recall ever felling these soreness when i was in my teens. I am wondering whether I should change racket, possibly graphene speed pro or something else. How do I alleviate these soreness?

    Thanks

  • #947

    leon alexander

    Is there a difference bettween dunlop biomimetic 200 and the 200 tour…the latter is slightly heavier at 12.6 oz strung wt…which one is more arm friendly ? THANX again an keep up the good work.

  • #946
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Dunlop Biomimetic 200 is on my top 10 list and it is a very arm friendly racquet definetly a lot more arm-friendly than the Dunlop Biomimetic 500

  • #945

    Leon

    HI…can you please advice which is more arm friendly dunlop biomimetic 200 or 500(not on you list)…thanx thomas.

  • #944

    leon alexander

    Hi,greetings from India…keep up the good work…..can you please advice about the feasibility of dunlop biomimetic 500 tour for me….i do ave tennis elbow problems…is the 500 tour arm friendly…thanx in advance..

  • #943

    Greg Smith

    Excellent information. Currently play with the old(er) Pro Kennex I-5. Good racquet for tennis elbow but lacks power. Out of your list, could you rank the top 4 for best power? Thanks

  • #942

    Luan

    Supposing i’m getting the F2.0 Tour, would you have a string suggestion to help on the TE issue ? I was thinking about having that strung at 52.

  • #941

    Luan

    Hi Thomas,

    I’m 25 and got back to playing 6 months ago after a 7 years break. Got a Aeropro Drive GT 2013 to restart and now facing TE issues. First advice at the doctor was to review equipment choices.
    I was looking for some of the tips you posted and found two new possible options, they are the following :

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/reviews/DBF2T/DBF2Treview.html

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/reviews/DBF5/DBF5Review.html

    I would rather go with Dunlop F2.0 Tour, considering the headsize and balance. But i also would like to have a good access to spin.

    What do you think about them ?

    Thanks in advance.

  • #940

    Neto

    Thomas, tks for your reply. I took your advice to my local tennis shop and for my surprise when discussing with the “expert” there he was surprised with the racquets I was looking for to reduce my tennis elbow pain. According to him all the tennis racquets you recommend are the heaviest options in the market and it does not make sense in his mind. He said your thought process makes sense in theory but in practice it doesn’t work. According to him he suggested these two racquets as the best for tennis elbow: Volkl Organix 5 or ProKennex Ionic Ki 15. What are your thoughts? Tks!!

  • #939
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Looking at the specs the Head Youtek Graphene Speed Pro, is a decent arm-friendly racquet due to its weight and head light balance, however it is a bit to stiff to be considered a top arm-friendly racquet

  • #938
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Babolat Aerop Pro Drive has been notorious for arm problems. The Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT (95), Prince EXO3 Rebel (95) and Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16×18 are all excellent choices and will be a huge improvement. You could stay with Babolat by going with the Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT, personally my favorite is the Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16×18, great for generating extra spin.

  • #937

    John

    Hi Thomas, Thank you very much for posting your arm-friendly recommendations. What do you think of the new Djokovic racquet, the Head Youtek Graphene Speed Pro?

  • #936

    Neto

    Hi Thomas. Tks for all this great info. I am in the early 40’s and getting back to playing tennis after more than 10 years without touching a racquet. I would say I am low intermediate player and after trying many racquets I ended up buying a 2012 Babolat Aerop Pro Drive. I have been playing with this racquet for 4 months and although I loved it the feeling I started to feel a lot of pain in my elbow and it is now unbearable to a point I can’t play anymore. I had the Babolat Xcel string and switched to Babolat VS Natural Gut at 55lbs but still not feeling much better on my elbow. I found your website and wanted to get your opinion between these racquets: Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT (95), Prince EXO3 Rebel (95) and Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16×18. Which one would you recommend? Tks!!

  • #935
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Yes the Prince EX03 Tour is definately more arm-friendly than the Prince EXO3 White it is more flexible and is on my list of top 10 arm-friendly racquets.

  • #934

    Julian

    I recently got myself a used Prince EXO3 White because I read that it is really arm friendly. I like it so far. It seems a lot softer on my arm than my previous Wilsons. Now reading that the EXO3 Tour might be even better on the arm got me thinking again. What is your opinion.

  • #933
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    You are right that adding lead tape in the handle will help make the racquet more arm-friendly by making it more head light balanced and increasing the overall weight. Of the strings you mentioned I would lean towards the Technifibre NR2 which is extremely elastic and is one of my top 10 recommendations.

  • #932

    Cae

    Hello Thomas,

    I’ve undergone two arthroscopic shoulder surgeries on my dominant arm, due to joint instability (labrum tears) and am looking for a racquet to suit my playing style that’ll also allow for maximum comfort. I am a NTRP 4.0 player, age 30 and I’m looking for a racquet that will provide support for my spin-oriented style. I’m currently using a Fischer Pro Extreme FT Air Carbon, which is an interesting racquet, but getting a bit old. I’ve screened quite a few racquets so far and I’ve managed to narrow down my current choices to the following with a list of concerns with each:

    Babolat Pure Storm Ltd GT (18/20 string pattern, low swing weight)
    Wilson BLX Pro Staff 90 (small head size, high weight, stiffness 65, otherwise very intrigued by this racquet)
    Wilson BLX Pro Staff 95 (low power in reviews)
    Head Youtek IG Radical Pro (only 3pts headlight, 34cm)
    Dunlop Biomimetic Max 200G (low power and stiffness 65)
    Prince Exo3 Tour 100 16/18 (very flexible, apparently the fell is weird and some felt that it lacks control)

    I’m planning to use natural gut strings perhaps combined with poly or maybe Luxilon Alu.

    I’m trying to narrow down the list to about 2-4 racquets which I’ll then demo before I make the final choice. Any help in regards to narrowing the list down or maybe finding a racquet that’s best suited to my needs would be greatly appreciated.

  • #931

    Vittorio

    Hi Thomas, first of all thank you so much for what you are doing, it’s very informative.
    I own a few Head Prestige Liquidmetal MP racquets and I like the way they play very much, but at times I tend to get a stiff arm.
    The stiffness is 64 so at the limit of being an arm friendly racquet.
    What if I add some lead tape around the handle or add weight inside the handle to change the specs around?
    Technically this should make it more head light, increase the total weight of the racquet and lower the swing weight, all good things to make it more arm friendly based on your info.
    Do you think that by adding something like 15-20 grams of weight would do the trick and make the racquet more arm friendly?
    I have already added about 4 grams in total at 3 and 9 o’clock for stability and plow trough but of course by doing so I made it a bit more head heavy and increased the swing weight which are bad for my arm.
    One more question, between Tecnifibre NRG 2 and X-one Biphase, which one do you suggest being more arm friendly?

    Thank you so much for your help.

  • #930
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    It sounds like you really did your research and came up with excellent choices. Good luck!

  • #929

    Raheel Chohan

    Hi Thomas,
    I really appreciate the great information you have provided here to help naive tennis players like me. I am just getting over a bout of tennis elbow that took me 4-6 weeks by using the ‘Tyler Twist’ technique with flex bars. I am looking to get the following frame configuration and would definitely love to hear your thoughts on it:

    – ProKennex Heritage Type C Redondo MidPlus
    – Head size: 98 in
    – Technifibre NRG2 16 – Mains
    – Technifibre NRG2 17 – Crosses
    – Strung at 50lbs

  • #928

    Eric

    Hi again Thomas,
    How do you explain such a difference of “evaluation” in the Prince Rebel (95) swingweight between Tennis Express (300) and Tennis Warehouse (331). 31 is a huge difference on a crucial aspect to decide to go with that model or not. There is also a difference in the balance: 10 Headlight for TE and 7 for TW. Thank you in helping figure that out.

  • #927

    Luis

    Thank you very much!

  • #926
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Other factors such as head light balance and flexible frame are important and all of the racquets in my top 10 have those characteristics. Swingweight can be important and some of my recommended racquets such as the Babolat Pure Storm and the Prince Rebel have low swingweights.

  • #925

    Luis

    Hi Thomas,
    I have problems with my shoulder, mostly because of my american twist service. This list of racquets are also good for my case? Or you think I should consider other aspects, such as a low swing wheight?
    Thank you!
    Greetings from Brazil

  • #924
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Wilson PS 6.1 95 would be a big improvement over the Prince Warrior DB Team 100 mainly because the Prince Warrior DB Team 100 is much too lightweight to be considered a top arm-friendly racquet.

  • #923
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I agree that the Dunlop Biomimetric 200 Lite is a very good choice, along with the DUNLOP Biomimetic Max 200G and the
    Dunlop Biomimetic 200 (95) (click for more info)

  • #922

    Eric

    Hi,
    What do you think about the Dunlop Biometric 200 Lite, that has a pretty low swingweight and good flexibility? I’ve read positive comments about it. I would have liked to try the Prince Exo Tour but this racket is not available in Canada (I see that it is the case in Mexico too), plus I heard that it is more difficult to string because of the port system. Thank you for your thought.

  • #921

    Bruno

    Hi, greetings from Paris
    I’ve just recovered from a tennis elbow which kept me out of a tennis court for 6 months. I used to play with a Prince Warrior DB Team 100. Do you think a Wilson PS 6.1 95 would feel more comfortable for my elbow ? By the way are you sure of the specs ? A pro tennis shop in Paris has measured its flexibility to 66 RA which makes a big difference with the 63 RA you announce. Thanks and congratulation for this website that brings hope back to thousands of tennis players.

  • #920

    Luís

    Hi Thomas,
    I’ve seen that the Babolat website says the stiffness of Pure Storm LTD is 67 ra. Do you know why the difference?
    Greetings from Brazil!

  • #918

    Luís

    Hi Thomas, I’ve seen in Babolat website (http://www.babolat.com/product/tennis/racket/pure-storm-limited-+) that the flexibility of Pure Storm LTD is 67 ra. Is it equivalent to 58 rdc? Thank you for the informations!

  • #919

    Luís

    Hi Thomas, I’ve seen in Babolat website (http://www.babolat.com/product/tennis/racket/pure-storm-limited-+) that the flexibility of Pure Storm LTD is 67 ra. Is it equivalent to 58 rdc? Thank you for the informations!

  • #917

    George

    Thanks Thomas for the great site. I have tried new racquets and new strings. I even purchased a sting machine to reduce my stringing costs and strung with different lbs. They all helped but was still feeling enough pain to the point I thought stop playing tennis. But the best thing happen to my tennis elbow problem was a pro lesson I had. My pro changed my grip. I used to hold my racquet very tight and now I hold my racquet very loose, barely holding it. This was a huge change. I don’t feel pain at all and still can swing hard. This reduce a lot the transmitted vibration to the elbow. I hope this message can help someone else.

  • #916

    George

    Thanks Thomas for the great site. I have tried new racquets and new strings. I even purchased a sting machine to reduce my stringing costs and strung with different lbs. They all helped but was still feeling enough pain to the point I thought stop playing tennis. But the best thing happen to my tennis elbow problem was a pro lesson I had. My pro changed my grip. I used to hold my racquet very tight and now I hold my racquet very loose, barely holding it. This was a huge change. I don’t feel pain at all and still can swing hard. This reduce a lot the transmitted vibration to the elbow. I hope this message can help someone else.

  • #915

    Emerson

    OK great! Thank you very much!! I will try to add a lead tape below the cushion grip. Anywhere under the grip is a good location, since Head Microgel MP is kind a HH? Thank you again!

  • #914
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Head Radical Microgel Mp (98) has a flexible frame and I would consider it an arm-friendly racquet although it is a bit on the light side – I would consider adding some lead tape. If you sqwitch to the Prince EXO3 that may help since that racquet is even more flexible, a bit heavier and has more of a head light balance.

  • #913

    Emerson

    Greeting from Brazil. Thank you for the precious info you sharing with us. I am using now a Head Radical Microgel Mp (98) with a Wilson Enduro pro string (t:56) oe sigmum pro (t:56). I am dont have have a classic TE but I have a chronic biceps pain. Do you think my racquet/string is causing that? You think worth it to go for one of your list? Babolat is known by causing arm issues. I have Babolat PST Ltd GT and Prince EXO3 tour 100 in mind. Any sugestion? Thank you and congratulations again.

  • #912
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Maybe you should try the PRINCE EXO3 Rebel 95, although it is a heavy racquet it is very maneuverable and has a very low swingweight of only 300. It is currently selling for $149

  • #911

    JAT

    What a fantastic service you are providing. Wonder if you can help me – I injured my elbow badly two years ago and want to get back into tennis. I have never been more than a low intermediate player, just play for fun. I am a 54 year old woman with good general fitness but not much strength. Could you recommend an arm friendly racquet that will be easy to handle and not ultra expensive please?

  • #910
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Wilson BLX 98 Blade is pretty arm friendly but does not quite make my top 10 because it is slightly stiffer and lighter than the others. It is only slightly stiffer than the Wilson Prostaff Six.One(95) but considerably lighter and for a frame that light I would like to see a more flexible frame.

  • #909
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    It depends how large a head size you are looking for as you get larger the frames become less arm-friendly. The largest head size I am recommending is 100 square inches which the Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16 x 18 has, also the HEAD-Youtek-IG-Prestige-MP and the Volkl Organix 10 325G are 98 sq inches

  • #908
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Both the EX03 16×18 and the EX03 18×20 are very arm-friendly the difference is the with 16×18 the ball stays on the strings looker giving you more touch and spin and is also more powerful.
    The Dunlop Biomimetric 400 Tour is pretty average in terms of being arm-friendly as it is a bit stiffer then you would want.
    As far as string tension go as low as you can go without losing control which is lower with the lower power control racquets.

  • #907

    thys

    Is the Wilson BLX 98 Blade much stiffer than the Wilson Prostaff Six.One(95) and will it be bad for tennis elbow. If not what string tension would you suggest.

  • #906

    Tammy

    Hi,

    Just came upon this website and love the comments. I play in a competitive 4.0 league and have been suffering from tennis elbow. I took time off, went to therapy and had to have a shot 8 months ago. It comes and goes and I think it is my racquet. I want to demo some that you mentioned but I have been playing with an oversize head. Is there any arm friendly oversized racquet? I did try a Volkl racquet that I liked but I can’t seem to get my hand on it from our pro and can’t remember which racquet it was., and it was an oversize head. Any suggestions?

    Thanks.

  • #905

    Manos

    Greetings from Greece. Thank you for all this useful info! Recently I have some issues with my elbow. Currently I play with a Wilson BLX Blade 98. As I understand it and having read this site, this racquet is considered as an arm friendly one. For a friendlier one I had a look to your top 10 and have a few questions:
    1) Is there a difference between the Prince EXO3 Tour 100 16×18 and the 18X20?
    2) What do you think about Dunlop Biomimetic 400 Tour?
    3) What should I know about string tension (regarding my elbow problem)?

    Thanks in advance

  • #904
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Both the head microgel radical MP (11.0oz, 57 flex) and the microgel prestige MP (11.8oz, 63 flex)
    would be a huge improvement. I would have to say the flexibile frame is the most important factor for avoiding tennis elbow

  • #903
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The WILSON Tempest Four BLX definetly can cause problems for you because it is extremely lightweight. The WILSON Steam 99 Tennis Racquet would be a slight improvement but is a very stiff frame. You are right that all my recommended racquets are listed as having a fast swingspeed, however the speed that you are able to get is most influenced by a raquets swingweight so I would go through my recommended racquets and look for some of the ones with the lowest swingweights for instance I noticed that the PRINCE New EXO3 Rebel 95 has a 300 swingweight which is the same swingweight as the WILSON Tempest Four BLX

  • #902

    Rosen

    which is more important to avoid tennis elbow, a heavier racquet or a flexible racquet?

    id like to choose between head microgel radical MP (11.0oz, 57 flex) and the microgel prestige MP (11.8oz, 63 flex)

    my current racquet is the microgel extreme (11.2oz, 68 flex) which gave me tennis elbow after playing with it only twice.

    previous racquet was prince TT scream (10.2oz, 72 flex), used this for years and never developed tennis elbow, now im using this again.

  • #901
    Profile photo of Tom Palmer
    Tom

    I am 70 yrs old and just developed bad case of TE. I suspect it is in part due to the racquet I am using (Wilson BLX Tempest Four) which is almost on the opposite extreme of your recs. The only issue I see with changing equip is the swing speed. All of the recs suggest “fast” and I may be fast for my age but likely not so in the literal sense. Any thoughts?

    I demoed the new Wilson 99 Steam (spin) which has some of the characteristics you recommend but not all. What are your feelings on this racquet?

  • #900

    Sebastian

    My question is about the new material, the Graphene, placed in middle of the new speed 300.
    Should i go with the new one with graphene or the speed ig from 2012?

  • #899
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I agree that the Head youtek IG Radical MP racquet would be a huge improvement over the Babolat Pure Drive. You should also consider the HEAD-Youtek-IG-Prestige-MP

  • #898
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    If you are talking about the HEAD Youtek IG Speed MP 300 Tennis Racquet it is a very flexible racquet and arm friendly though a bit on the light side I would consider adding lead tape if you are going to use it

  • #897
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Wilson Prostaff SixOne BLX is a very arm-friendly racquet and is one of my top 10 arm friendly racquets

  • #896

    James

    Hi!
    I suffer from a serious tennis elbow problem (caused I suppose by Babolat Pure Drive racquet), and a local coatc recomended me to get a Head youtek IG Radical MP racquet, which I am now looking itno.
    Can you please comment on this racquet, it’s playability and how good would it be for tennis elbow issue!?
    Thanks a bunch!

    Cheers.

  • #895

    Sebastian

    Thank you! I’ll test the prestige. Another question: is there a difference between the speed ig mp (2012), vs the new one with graphene (obviously asking about my elbow). Thank you

  • #894
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    For right now there is the Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16 x 18 which is 100si the HEAD-Youtek-IG-Prestige-MP at 98si and the Volkl Organix 10 325G at 98si That is quite a good choice have you tried all of these yet?

  • #893

    Jerome

    Hi, this article is informative and really helpful in choosing “arm-friendly” racquets. I would like to ask if how arm-friendly is Wilson Prostaff SixOne BLX to beginners/intermediate players? Thanks.

  • #892

    karenNY

    Hello,
    I started playing tennis using the Pure Drive Lite and after a couple of years, I developed severe golfers elbow. Time off, PT and home Ultrasound and stim units helped until I picked up the racquet again. I decided to switch to Avery M5 and my pain was substantially reduced. In fact, I am able to play daily. I’m finding that as much as I still enjoy the racquet, I am not getting the maneuverability or hit accuracy (as I’m getting better). Could it be the weight of the racquet, 12 3/8oz? This racquet is slightly heavier than your top 10 racquets. Will an ounce make a difference? I definitely want to pick-up my game, Should I demo the top 4 racquets you mentioned in your April 9th reply? Oh, I’m 3.0ish player and moving up. Thanks in advance.

  • #891

    Javier

    First of all congratulations and thank you for the terrific service you provide. I understand your point that a smaller headsize is better for the arm and this is probably why 6 out of your top 10 racquets are in the 93-95 square inches range. But there are many of us who won’t (or can’t) play with such small and demanding headsize racquets. Could you give us a top 10 list for mid-plus racquets (98-102 square inches) only? Between Donnay, Dunlop, ProKennex, Yonnex, Wilson, Head, Prince, Technifibre, Pacific, among others, we should be able to find at least 10 very good flexible racquets in the mid-plus category. Many thanks in advance.

  • #890
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    If you have a lot of pain you need to rest for a month. When you start playing again if you use one of the racquets recoomended here http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets/ along with one of the strings recommended here http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-string/ you will be able to get back to playing pain free a lot sooner and the pain will be a lot less likely to return.

  • #889

    Lori

    Hi,

    I have had a horrible pain in my elbow for about 2 months. Do you have any idea how long tennis elbow takes to heal. I am down to playing once a week because I committed to a league, and I am using an arm band, however, serving and overhead shots are extremely painful. Any suggestions?

  • #888
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Head Intelligence itour actually has a 67 flex rating. The NXT string is very elastic and a very arm friendly choice by using NXT with a low tension you are really helping reduce vibration but a lower flex racquet like the Prince EX03 tour would still make a huge difference.

  • #887

    Danny

    Hello

    I am playing with the Head Intelligence itour with Wilson NXT tour strings at 52lbs. I tried lower tension but started to lose control completely. I have adapted to the lower string tension quite well I have had an elbow operation for golfer’s elbow and get on okay but have to aplly ice every time I play and cannot git flat serves.

    I think the Head Intelligence I tour reduced vibration quite well and think flex is about 64.

    Would I notice much difference with the Prince ex03 tour 100 do you think? I am thinking the lower string tension makes more difference than the extra flex but perhaps I am mistaken.

  • #886
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    All of my top 10 are excellent compared to the hundreds or maybe thousands of models out there. Personally I use the Prince EX03 tour.

  • #885

    Rolf

    Hi Thomas,I found your explanations very interesting – I am trying to decide which of your recommended racquets to purchase. Could I ask you which of these would be your top pick, in terms of being arm friendly, if you had to put them in order?

  • #884
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The pure drive is notorious for arm problems. The head speed mp is much more arm friendly though not as arm friendly as my top 10 listed. If you like the head spped mp maybe you should try the HEAD-Youtek-IG-Prestige-MP first.

  • #883

    Sebastian

    Hi, im 30 years old, level 5.0. I use a pure drive, and had elbow pain recently (muscle contracture, not TE).
    Las week, after see this page and others, I tested the prince exo3 tour 16×18, very arm friendly but i cant get used to it. I found it hard to handle, compared to pure drive.
    Yesterday I test a head speed mp, and really like it, waht do you think about this racquet about arm friendlyness??
    Thanls

  • #882
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Babolat Pure Storm Team GT is a very good racquet for your arm and much better than the Babolat Pure Drive. You should also try the BABOLAT New Pure Storm GT which has a little more weight to help absorb some more of the shock.

  • #881

    Lorie

    How about the Babolat Pure Storm Team GT. I have been playing for a year and a couple weeks after getting the Babolat Pure Drive I started developing elbow problems. I notice the Pure Storm Team has a low stiffness.

  • #880
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Based on the specs that I see for the Donnay XP Dual I would consider it to be an arm friendly racquet due to its good flexibility. However it is not as good as the top 10 I have listed due to its lighter weight.

  • #879

    James

    Thank you! Would the Donnay XP Dual be another one I should consider?. Thanks again for advice.

  • #878
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Try a racquet that is very flexible like the Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT (95), the Prince EXO3 Rebel (95) or the Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16 x 18 . Good luck!

  • #877

    James

    I broke my radius and ulna bones at the wrist joint a year ago. The bones were surgically repaired and have healed, but I still have significant discomfort when playing with my Head Extreme. What do think would be the best racket or two to limit pain at the wrist joint that I should demo? Before the injury I was a 4.5 player. I sincerely appreciate any advice you may have. Thank you!

  • #876

    Jose Luis

    Thank you VERY much Thomas –
    Based on reviews about the Prince EX03 Tour 100 elsewhere on the web – I had also chosen it first.
    Unfortunately – there are no Prince racquets for demo in Mexico City.
    So I am going to go for it anyway.
    Thank you very much again – and thank you for the strings’ links too 🙂

  • #875
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    All 4 are such excellent choices you should probably choose based on which feels best for you. If I had to rank in order of arm-friendliest from best down my top would be the Prince EX03 Tour 100, then the Dunlop Biomimetic 200 (95), then the Babolat Pure Storm Ltd GT and finally the Head Youtek IG Prestige MP

  • #874

    Nelusha

    Many, many thanks! Love this board. Everyone in our tennis club looks at it now!

  • #873
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Between the two I would say the Volkl Organix 6 is more arm friendly because it is more flexible, also the Volkl DNX is not in production so if you can even find it, the racquet would be either used or sitting someplace for a long time. Also if you want a racquet that is very arm-friendly try and compare the others to the VOLKL Organix 10 325G Tennis Racquet, even though its recommended for the more advanced player you can string it at a low tension and use an elastic string to get some extra power.

  • #872

    Jose Luis

    Hi again Thomas,
    I am wondering if you would be so kind in answering me one question:
    I have studied the characteristics of all your top 10 racquets on your list here above – and my four finalists are the Babolat Pure Storm Ltd GT, the Prince EX03 Tour 100, the Dunlop Biomimetic 200 (95), and the Head Youtek IG Prestige MP.
    My question is – according to your own opinion, how would you rank these four racquets in terms of arm-friendlier?
    Thank you VERY much for your attention Thomas – I really appreciate it.

  • #871

    Nelusha

    I am a 40 year old 3.0 player. I am struggling with tennis elbow and have been playing with the the Babolat Aeropro. Now I realize that it is not an arm-friendly racquet.

    My pro shop recommended the Volgl DNX 4 and the Volgl Organix 6. Any idea which of these might be better for a 3.0 players who wants to prevent tennis elbow. I will string with natural gut and wear a brace.

    Many thanks.

  • #870

    Jose Luis

    Thanks for your answer – I see what you mean.
    I was under the impression that a slightly lighter racquet was better for your arm – less stress.
    But I am learning – thank you very much again Thomas.
    I really hope you keep up your great work.
    Please continue updating this Top 10 list as new racquets & strings keep coming into the market.

  • #869
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your comment. I am not sure why you would say the Yonex Ezone Xi 98 is arm friendlier than the Vcore 95D. The Vcore 95D is more flexible with a flex rating of 62, a heavier frame with a strung weight of 11.8 oz and has a more head light balance of -7HL The Ezone Xi 98 has a flex rating of 67, a strung weight of 11.7oz and a head balance of -6HL. If you are currently using the Ezone Xi 98 I would consider trying the Vcore 905D, the most important factor is the stiffness of the Ezone Xi 98

  • #868

    Jose Luis

    Hi Thomas,
    Thank you very much for this website – I am so glad I found it.
    I am wondering why you didn’t include in your top 10 list the Yonex Ezone Xi 98.
    I am under the impression that the Ezone Xi 98 is arm friendlier than the Vcore 95D.
    I am very curious to know your thoughts on this.
    Thank you very much again.

  • #867
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I agree the Yonex RD TI 80 has very arm friendly specs but it is out of production so a new model that is also very arm friendly the Yonex Vcore 95D has made my top 10 list. Also as far as arm friendly strings you can see the top 10 list at http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-string/

  • #866
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    I agree that the Wilson BLX Blade Team is arm friendly due to its high flexibility but it is a bit too lightweight to be considered one of the top arm friendly racquets. If you like it and have not been having any arm problems you should stick with it for a while.

  • #865

    John

    I like the Yonex RD TI 80. It is a good racket for people who suffer from tennis elbow. Let us also not forget the fact that strings play a big role in having tennis elbow. Can you please post a list of tennis elbow friendly strings? Thanks. 🙂

  • #864

    James

    I am kinda surprised that the Wilson BLX Blade Team (2011 version) is not on the list. I am a big fan of the racket and I find it very arm friendly.

  • #863

    Ronald

    Yeah, the Team Tour’s weight could be a concern unless some lead is placed (am a 3.5 player coming from a Babolat Pure Drive which just gave me some elbow issues).

    Anyway, will take a hard look again at the regular EXO3 Tour 16×18 and some PK sticks which are also on my radar screen. Unfortunately, there is no demo program in my country so I have to rely on reviews and inputs on the net. Thanks again!

  • #862
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Prince EXO3 Team Tour 100 is flexible enough. My concern would be the light weight at only 10.7 oz strung I could not consider it a true arm friendly racquet. If you where to use it I would at least want to add some lead tape.

  • #861

    Ronald

    Thanks for the helpful information.

    Am thinking of getting a Prince EXO3 Team Tour 100 and would like to know what’s your take on this racquet. It’s a bit stiffer than the regular EXO3 tour (RDC 60 vs 52) but at 44, I would appreciate some free power.

    Thanks

  • #860
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    You must be refering to the Dunlop Biomimetic 200 Tour which I have listed at 60 Tennisexpress also has 60 while tennis-warehouse has 61 either way it quite flexible and arm friendly.

  • #859

    mikey

    I think you have the RDC Flex rating for the Dunlop Biomimetic 200 wrong. The link states 60, other sites 63

  • #858
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    The Babolat Pure Storm LTD is an excellent choice. It is a flexible frame, with a headlight balance and a nice weight. It meets all my criteria on this page which is why it is one of my recommended racquets. I would recommend one of the strings on this page http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-string/ if you want to stick with Babolat go with either the Babolat Xcel or the Babolat Addiction or even the Babolat VS Natural if you can afford natural gut. I would string it a few pounds below the middle of the recommended range and try to gradually string it looser as you get used to it.

    • #12127

      håkon

      Hello again, good site! how is babolat pure storm (not ltd) for albowpain?

      • #22234
        Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
        Thomas Tennis
        Keymaster

        I’m not sure what you mean by not ltd because every Babolat Pure Storm I can find is ltd. The Babolat Pure Storm is great for your elbow, it used to be on my top 10 list but it has been out of production for a while.

  • #857

    Stephanie

    I am thinking about buying a Babo storm ltd gt for my tennis elbow and am trying to string it with elbow friendly strings. Which brand, tension or gauge strings do you recommend please? Thanks

  • #856

    Rick Mades

    I use the Dunlop Aerogel 200 and may eventually switch to the Dunlop Biomimetic 200. I had tennis elbow for about 13 years. A flexible racquet, heavier and softer strings are all very important. When I had serious elbow problems, I had to string my racquets very loose (45 lbs), but actually string them in the high 50’s now. If I wasn’t living in S. Florida, where it is warm, and back in the Northeast, I would be using a looser tension, as the cold weather can affect my arm.

  • #855
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    My top 10 list of arm-friendly racquets: Racquet RDC Flex Strung Weight Balance Yonex EZone Ai 98 (click for more info) 61 11.3 -4HL HEAD YT Graphene
    [See the full post at: Tennis Racquets]

  • Author
    Posts
  • #61713
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian T.
    Participant

    Thomas,
    Please tell me you opinion about Wilson Blade 18×20 countervail (2017). Thank you in advance, Lucian

  • #61705
    Profile photo of Leandro
    Leandro
    Participant

    Hi Thomas!
    Im about to buy a new racquet because i developed Golfer’s Elbow (once again)

    I never had a problem playing with Babolat (Aeropro Drive 2013), but when i change my racquet to Babolat Pure Aero with a smaller grip size and strung with Luxilon Alu power, immediatily feel pain on my wrist and elbow.

    After 6 months recovery, i get back to my old Aeropro Drive 2013, and every two or three weeks, my elbow start to hurt again (Only Golfer’s Elbow pain)

    I get recommended to string with soft poly’s or multifilament, but if is possible i want to stay with poly strings because i play with a lot of spin and break string very often (2 or three weeks)

    Here my list of soft poly string:

    head lynx 18
    head sonic pro 17/16
    luxilon element 16
    babolat pro hurricane 18

    And about racquets, seller’s in my country give me these options:

    – Babolat Pure Aero Tour (strung at low 50’s)
    – Head Graphene Touch Instinct MP (adding lead tape at 3-9 and strung at 50lb)
    – Head Graphene Touch Speed Pro (strung at 50lb)
    – Head Graphene Touch Speed MP (adding lead tape at 3-9 and strung at 50lb)
    – Prince Textreme Warrior 100 (strung at 53lb)

    What about these options you recommend me?

    Thanks in advance!

    Sorry if i post twice 🙁

  • #61696
    Profile photo of Gustavo
    Gustavo
    Participant

    Hi Thomas. I need to buy new raquets. I´been with some tennis elbow problems. I was happy with de Wilson 2016 blade 104. but it´s not any more at my country, and the 2017 version is totally differnt. Could the Wilson blade 16×19 CV (2017) be a good option? I know is stiffer but it has the misterious CV. Maybe adding extra weight in the handle? I`d prefer the 16×19 over the 18×20 because of the extra spin. Regards. Gustavo

    • #61711
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Leonardo,
      Out of the choices that you list I would definitely go with the Graphene Touch Speed Pro it is a very arm elbow friendly racquet and is even one of the racquets currently on my top 10 list

  • #61633

    Jose Boni

    Hi Thomas, Thanks for the awesome information and advise you provide in thi site.

    I’d like your opinion on how should I pick among two racquets in your list: Yonex EZone DR 98 and Pro Kennex KI Q Tour. I am 47 y.o. intermediate player currently playing with a 7 y.o. Head Radical, pretty stiff. I have recently came back to courts after having suffered from elbow and shoulder injuries, so I’d like a racquet that is very easy on the arm while providing decent control. I play twice or may be three times a week, for a couple hours.

    Thanks a lot!

    Jose

  • #61570
    Profile photo of RICARDO SOARES
    RICARDO SOARES
    Participant

    Hi,Thomas!
    Great site!Congratulations for all the knowledge from here!

    I´m a 37ys intermediate player, and with tennis elbow.
    I´m playing with Wilson Blade 20×18(2015 model,not CV), with 22kg tension and NXT strings.
    In this site, you consider this an arm frindly racquet, but I think it´s too heavy for my game.
    I have a decent technique and I´m always struggling with this frame:(
    Can you advise me about some lighter frames and 100 head size(not 98,as the Blade) thast you may consider less stiffer than my actual frame?
    Are these good options below?:
    -Head Graphene XT Radical S
    -Wilson Blade 104(2015)
    -Yonex DR 100 Lite Version
    -Wilson Burn LS

    Thanks a lot!

  • #61555

    Rob

    I noticed that a lot of the racquets have a tighter string spacing e.g. 18×20. Is that just coincidental? Any feedback on string count, as I am
    thinking of less strings for more spin

    • #61561
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Rob,
      An open string pattern makes it easier to generate spin. It also creates a more flexible string bed and everything else being equal an open string pattern will be create less stress on your elbow.

    • #61560
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Rob,
      An open string pattern makes it easier to generate spin. It also creates a more flexible string bed and everything else being equal an open string pattern will be create less stress on your elbow.

  • #61540

    Mike Wood

    Thomas,
    I’m surprised to not see the Pro Kennex Classic 5G on your list of elbow-friendly rackets. It’s specifications are as good or better than most of the rackets on your list. A physical therapist (and 5.0 tennis player) recommended it to me 15 years ago and I still use it today with no elbow pain. I believe it is still Pro Kennex’s best-seller.

    Mike Wood

    • #61542
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mike,
      The Pro Kennex Classic 5G is a great arm friendly racquet. It is very similar to the Pro Kennex QI K5 315 which is even a bit more flexible and it also uses additional technology that makes it even more stable on impact.

  • #61049

    Sangam

    Hi Thomas,
    Thanks for the wonderful post.
    I am looking for arm friendly tennis racquets which are less than 300 grams. Can you recommend any?
    What is your opinion on the following:
    1) Pro Kennex Kinetic Q Tour 300
    2) Pro Kennex Kinetic Ki 5 280
    3) Pro Kennex kinetic Ki 15 260 G
    Thanks.

    • #61135
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Sangam,
      Of the 3 racquets you mention the one that is arm and elbow friendly is the Ki Q Tour 300.

  • #60761

    Andrew

    Hey Thomas,

    What are your thoughts on the Prince textreme warrior 107? I am hoping it is arm friendly enough that i don’t have to sell them and get the 100p! Been having arm and shoulder problems but could be attributed to me being excited to play again after two years and just overworking myself.

    Thank You!

  • #60731

    carrie

    What is your opinion re the headXTR speed grapheme Is it te same as the one on your list?
    Head XT Graphene MP

    • #60743

      Thomas_Tennis

      Carrie,
      There are a number of Head XT Graphene Speed Racquets so I do not know which one you are refering to and none of them are the same as the HEAD XT Graphene MP that is on my top 10 list

      • #60755

        carrie

        HI Thomas
        Thanx. But regarding the Head xt graphene mp on your list.. Is it the prestige? When I google it it comes as prestige or speed etc.

        Also…I do suffer from severe tennis elbow so which of your racquets is the very best one??
        Thanx.

         

         

        • #60780

          Thomas_Tennis

          Carrie,
          It is the Head Prestige, just click on the link. All 10 racquets in the top 10 list are very arm friendly, you just have to pick the one you personally like best and you cant go wrong

  • #60694

    Leandro

    Hello Thomas!

    I always play with Babolat rackets since i start playing tennis (13 years ago, now im 25) and never had a problem.
    I was playing with Aeropro Drive 2013 (grip 3) strung with RPM Blast at 58lb. In february of this year, i buy the new Babolat Pure Aero (grip 2) and strung with Luxilon Alu Power at 54lb. After two hitting sessions, i get tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow and wrist pain so i sold it.
    I start to play again three weeks ago, back with my Aeropro Drive 2013 and no have a problem, but during a match, i break strings and have to change racket and i have to play with Aeropro Drive GT strung with RPM Team at 55lb. After ten minutes, my elbow start to hurt me again so i stoped and resting until i could came back but now i decide to leave babolat and switch racket more arm friendly.

    I was looking for Prince Textreme Tour 100p and Warrior 100, what would you recommend me?

    Also i would like to keep using poly strings but at lower tension.

    thanks!

    • #60697
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Leonardo,
      The Prince Textreme Tour 100p would be a lot more arm friendly than the Aeropro Drive 2013 or the Babolat Pure Aero it is also more arm friendly than the Warrior 100.

    • #60696
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Leonardo,
      The Prince Textreme Tour 100p would be a lot more arm friendly than the Aeropro Drive 2013 or the Babolat Pure Aero it is also more arm friendly than the Warrior 100.

  • #60605

    JP

    Hello Thomas,
    For the past year I´ve been playing with a ProKennex KI15 260 and haven´t been able to get rid of my tennis elbow. Have changed my grip, my posture on both my forehand and backhand and have improved my looking at the ball (not all the times) and my follow through on my swing but still can’t play more than once or twice a week without developing a considerable amount of pain. I have gone to the orthopedist and recommended some serious physical therapy, which I have been doing on a more or less consistent basis. Nevertheless, I bought three of the racquets you mentioned here a year ago and Prince I couldn´t use Yonex is somehow better but Volk seems to make it for me with the addition of some weight on the head. The problem is that I need some adjustment on my swing and get too lazy to do it so I just go back to what works for me, KI15 260. It seems to be my impression but every time I use a 300 grams or over racquet my pain intensifies. All of them with hybrid FXP and 60 lbs of tension. The last addition is a ProKennex KI20, which also seems to be really good with my arm but no real power and lots of balls at the net. I go back to the KI15 but it hurts my arm. I am even developing my left arm to be able to continue my game. As you can see I have a big resolution NOT to let this elbow, epicondylitis define my love for the sport. Hope you have the chance to share your valuable feedback with me. Best always,
    JP

  • #60604
    Profile photo of Gustavo
    Gustavo

    Thomas:

    Thank you very much. Regards. Gustavo.

  • #60598

    Ted Murphy

    I have a damaged elbow from playing with dead strings and hitting with too open a stance on my forehand. It requires surgery to heal and I’m not up to having it. I have changed from a semi-western forehand grip to an Eastern so that I cannot hit the ball as hard. It has helped.

    Here are additional findings: I like denser string patterns (18 x 20) because I can string the racquet looser without losing control. (The dense string bed plays stiffer than an open one and the ball will come in contact with more string to enhance control.) Also, I like thicker strings (15L) to enhance control and durability on loose string jobs.

    Multifilament strings are best – they are softer. Likewise with natural gut. Avoid stiff strings (esp. stiff polyester ones). Experiment with looser strings as they have less vibration and enhance stability.

    Larger head frames are best – they are more forgiving. However, few have dense string patterns. Don’t go too big or you will lose some maneuverability. A larger head will also be more stable and put less pressure on the hand to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand.

    Slightly head heavy frames (1-2 points head heavy) are best because they absorb shock well and slow a player’s swing. The slower the swing, the less shock on the arm/elbow/wrist. A head heavy frame is also more stable. I bought a Head Microgel Oversize and added lead tape at the 3 and 9 o’clock positions of the head to reduce shock. It helped a lot!

    Flexible racquets are best but too flexible ones may have vibration. Always check a frame’s RA (stiffness level) and think twice before buying a frame with a 68 RA measurement or higher. I prefer an RA rating of about 60.

    Standard 27 inch frames are best as they are easier to swing, requiring less effort on the arm. That being said, I have a 27.5″ frame that is oversize and I play well with it. I let the frame do the work and focus on making contact in the sweet spot. It’s important to watch the ball hitting the strings so that it hits the sweet spot more often. The additional length gives me more spin, better reach and more power with less effort. (It’s a slightly head heavy frame.)

    Use as large a grip size as is comfortable – you will not have to squeeze the grip as hard to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand. If you like head light frames, get a heavy one (11 ounces or more) to reduce shock and twisting. I also like a flatter grip shape, e.g., Volkl frames, to enhance stability on my Eastern grip forehand.

    Select a frame with good vibration dampening abilities, e.g., with Textreme (or similar shock decreasing product like Countervail), a built in string vibration dampener in the bridge or large grommets / ports.

    Correct poor technique. Try to use less wrist on your shots; use more shoulder turn instead. Take a lesson if necessary to correct your technique if needed.

    I hope this helps.

  • #60567

    thomas

    Hey Thomas,i am about to take a hard decision these days,i am a big hitter with lots of spin and the couple of years i am playing with the head utek speed mp 300,stifness 60,recently i demo a yonex dr 98 and dr 100 although i really liked it i am not sure if its more arm friendly from my head and beacause i have a sore shoulder and elbow,whats your opinion?

    • #60596
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Thomas,
      The Yonex DR 98 would be better for your arm than the Head YOUTEK IG Speed 300, since it is signficialy more flexible and more head lite balanced, however the Yonex DR 100 would not be better because it is a stiffer frame.

      • #60602

        thomas

        Thomas thanks for your answer,so ai/dr 98 is more arm friendly from my ig speed mp 300,what about compare it to prince tour pro 100 16/19?
        Must make the final decision here!I like them both but i think tour pro is more arm friendly than ai 98,i use cyclone tour 22/23 kg the last months and probably stick with that

        • #60632
          Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
          Thomas Tennis
          Keymaster

          Thomas,
          Both the Yonex AI DR 98 and the Prince Tour 100 are very arm friendly racquets. The only problem with the Prince Tour 100 is that it has been out of production for at least a year so you will not be able to get one that is truely new, the best you will be able to do is get a unused one.

  • #60533

    Jodi Freedman

    Hi Again,

    Just wondering, will you be updating your charts of preferred racquets and strings soon?

    Thanks!

    • #60595
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Jodi,
      There is no specific timetable as to when I update my top 10 list. I do it one at a time depending on when I find something that is better than something else currently on the list

  • #60532

    Jodi Freedman

    Hi,
    So glad you just sent the link for the Wilson Blade 104. I am demo=ing the 98 as well as the 104, and trying to decide. I’m a 3.0-ish club/social player, and have had elbow problems. I felt that the 104 played easier, but the 98 felt better to my arm (although I felt that I had to hit the ball spot-on, really no forgiveness like the 104’s sweet spot.) Both demos had Wilson NXT 17, strung 55 TENSION (RE- MY ARM TROUBLES)

    SO- Any preference between the two? What about string? I previously used the Weiss canon explosive you recommended, and had no problems- although the pro didn’t like stringing it.

    What do you think?
    Thank-you!

    • #60594
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Jodi,
      I think that as a 3.0 club/social player the Wilson Blade 104 is ideal and the Wilson NXT is also a great choice, if you string it at 50 lbs it will be even easier on your arm, and give you some more power although it would be harder to control.

  • #60487
    Profile photo of Gustavo
    Gustavo

    Thomas:

    I´m trying to come back to tennis after a pair of years. Two month ago, after 5 matches I started with tennis elbow. The pain is still there. I was playing with a new wilson blade 104. Do you think this racket could affect my elbow? Is the blade 98 so much better for my elbow? Regards. Gustavo.

    • #60511
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Gustavo,
      I would like to tell you that the Wilson Blade 98 would be much better for you than the Wilson Blade 104 but I am not sure that is true because the Wilson Blade 104 is an arm friendly racquet and is very flexible. If you are playing at a high level against a lot of hard hitters the extra weight in the Wilson Blade 98 would help more.

    • #60510
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Gustavo,
      I would like to tell you that the Wilson Blade 98 would be much better for you than the Wilson Blade 104 but I am not sure that is true because the Wilson Blade 104 is an arm friendly racquet and is very flexible. If you are playing at a high level against a lot of hard hitters the extra weight in the Wilson Blade 98 would help more.

  • #60235

    Katie

    Hi,
    When I started playing tennis 4 years ago, I used the Wilson Juice 108 and developed tennis elbow fairly quickly. I played through the pain and assumed that as my form improved that the pain would go away. However, once I switched to the Wilson Juice Spin all my elbow pain disappeared. Back in March of this year, I switched to the Head Radical MPA and the elbow pain came back. I loved the power and feel of the racquet so I continued to use it. Now the pain is nearly unbearable – although I can still play, it hurts afterwards. After reading your article above, I think the answer is my equipment. Can you suggest a good racquet for me to demo? I usually string my racquets with Wilson Revolve at 55 on the mains and Gamma TNT2 at 58 on the crosses. I am currently using the 16×16 pattern on the Radical. Is there another string combo that you would suggest for power that is arm friendly? Thanks for your help!
    Katie

    • #60293
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Katie,
      I see why you would have had elbow problems with the Wilson Juice 108, this is a very typical racquet for giving users elbow problems, mis-recommended to many beginners having the combination of very high stiffness and lightweight. The Wilson Juice spin is a small step in the right direction since it is a bit heavier and the open spin pattern helps it to play a little more flexible, however I would still give it a low rating. Moving to the Head Radical MPA 16×16 should have helped, but it seems you may need something even more flexible, such as the Yonex EZONE DR98 or possibly the KENNEX QI K TOUR 295 if you are more comfortable with something lighter weight. Also you can try stringer with slightly less tension and changing from the Gamma TNT2 to the Gamma Live Wire

  • #60102

    Mohan

    Hi Thomas,
    I was playing with wilson prostaff 27 LS with natural gut strings . The strings moved SO MUCH that I raised the tension slowly up to 58.
    Now bad tennis elbow. After 2 week break planning to try yonex ezone dr 98 with natural gut at 46 tension. Good idea?

    • #60108
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mohan,
      You can’t get more arm friendly than a Yonex DR 98 Ezone strung with gut at a low tension.

      • #60752

        Mohan

        Coach,
        Thanks a lot. Elbow pain is gone and am playing my 4.0 game again at age 52. Only change I had to do is decrease the tension down to 40lb on my natural gut strings. This racket has more closed pattern when compared to my previous one wilson 97 RF LS. Strings dont move much in my yonex. Thanks once again.

  • #59878
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian T.

    Thomas,
    Thank you for your answer, very useful information, as usual. I decided to buy one racquet between Prince TEXTREME Tour 100P or Wilson Blade 98 18×20(Monfils). I do not have the opportunity to demo them. Which one is easier on the arm and elbow, the most important thing for me? I would like to know your opinion. Thanks and regards. Lucian T.

    • #60050
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucien,
      The Prince Textreme Tour 100 and the Wilson Blade 2015 18×20 are both great tennis racquets. Both very arm friendly with built in anti vibration technology. Both have very arm friendly specs, but if I was to choose based on only which is easier on the elbow I would go with the Prince Textreme Tour 100 only because it is a bit more flexible and more head light

  • #59853

    Pierre

    Hello,
    I have played during >20 years with the Wilson 6.1 and Wilson 95 series and now I guess because of age tennis elbow has become an important issue. I already changed my strings to be more arm friendly however this is not enough. I play 4-5 times a week and the issue is now recurrent. Time for me to use another, more arm friendly, racket than the Wilson 95. I would appreciate any advice you may have in that context. Some say that the Wilson 97S may be a good choice.
    Many thanks,
    Pierre

  • #59998

    danny

    As a Teaching Pro as well as a racquet technician, my level of experience being 30 years, I can attest that the Head Ti Radical OS (Oversize-107 sq in); Andre Agassi racquet cured more arm & shoulder related injuries than I can ever count.

    Strung at the low end of Mfg Rec, 55lbs with “soft” poly/co-poly or multifilament string (Head Rip control was engineered for this racquet) also very important.

    danny

  • #59983

    Carlos Contreras

    Hi, I’m using a Pure Drive (2012) and thinking about the Prince Textreme Warrior 100 (http://www.tennisexpress.com/prince-textreme-warrior-100-tennis-racquet-49128). Can you tell me something about it?

  • #59505
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian T.

    Hello Thomas,
    I have a big issue, please help.
    I am currently playing with a Prince Tour 100 (16×18), strung usually with Wilson NXT at 26. I like a lot how the racquet is playing and is really soft on my arm. The only issue is that due to the open pattern of the racquet, the strings are moving towards all sides and I always have to re-arrange them every time after couple of points. What type of string do you suggest me to use? I am sceptical about stringing with polys. What do you say?
    Second, do you think with Prince Tour 100p will I have the same issues?
    Thank you for your help and advice.
    Lucian

    • #59814
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucien the Prince the more open the string pattern the more the strings will move in general, but the open string pattern helps the racquet play more flexible and also makes it easier to generate spin.

    • #59813
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucien the Prince the more open the string pattern the more the strings will move in general, but the open string pattern helps the racquet play more flexible and also makes it easier to generate spin.

  • #59462

    Fabiao

    Thomas simple question is the Prince Tour 100 Pro under your list? There are some general missleading notes on the forum, the name of the racket is on the list but the link take us to a Prince Tour 16×20 or something. Did you experience the 100 Pro ever? Cheers.

    • #59477
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Fabio,
      The Prince Tour Pro 100 seems to be the older version of the PRINCE Tour 100 16X18 the specs are almost identical. I removed the word Pro from the one listed on my top 10 list to help avoid confusion.

    • #59476
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Fabio,
      The Prince Tour Pro 100 seems to be the older version of the PRINCE Tour 100 16X18 the specs are almost identical. I removed the word Pro from the one listed on my top 10 list to help avoid confusion.

  • #59348

    Chris Campbell

    Thomas
    I am nearing the end of a particularly nasty bout of TE. 49 years old and never had TE, despite lengthy junior career and playing in college. I developed TE when I came back too fast. I am currently playing with a BLX Blade 98 strung at 48# with Gamma LiveWire XP. I can play, but with a brace, after a dormant three month hiatus to heal. I am currently demoing racquets. Specifically, I would like your opinion on the following as to their arm friendliness;
    DR98 and 100, Blade98 18×20, TT95, Volkl SG10 320,, Wilson Ultra 97, and Volkl SG8 315.
    Thanks,
    Chris

    • #59460
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Chris,
      Out of the racquets you mentioned I really like the Wilson Ultra 97, the Wilson Blade 98 and the Yonex Dr 98.
      Tom

  • #59333
    Profile photo of James
    James

    Dear Thomas, thanks for running this great site. I’m a 5.0 aggressive baseliner and elbow issues for a few years. I had the aero pro drive but I switched to the Head IG Radical Pro (pre Grahphen) as it is much more flexible. That was an improvement but elbow issues returning lately. Too bad cause I like the feel of the racquet.
    I tried the Head GrapheneXT prestige MP you recommend. I liked it, too soon to tell about the elbow. I’m surprised you recommend it as as per tennis warehouse it’s a bit stiffer and lighter than my radical pro, but I guess it is more head light.
    I like heavy racquets so I was thinking of buying the ProKennex Ionix Ki5 PSE which gets great reviews for being arm friendly, though very heavy. I cannot play test it where I live so it’s a roll of the dice.
    I’m thinking posted stiffness ratings are a bit suspect. I have focused on stiffness when screening racquets but I now suspect elbow friendliness is a combination of all the specs. Thoughts or recommendations for me?

    • #59341
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      James,
      I agree that elbow friendliness is a combination of all racquet specs and that flex ratings are suspect as different resellers and manufactures often indicate different flex ratings. I am not sure I would buy The Pro Kennex Ionic Ki5 PSE if you cannot at least try it as it will take time to get used to the weight difference. You might want to try the Pro Kennex Kinetic KI Q Tour at 12.2 oz strung

  • #59303

    James

    Hi Thomas. Thanks for your wonderful website. suffering from both golfer’s and tennis elbow for a decade, I am shocked that I didn’t have any knowledge of racquets having this much impact on the condition. Thanks a lot.
    I have a question before I make a decision. I noticed there are many different Prince Tour versions besides the one you had on your list. Prince Tour Pro 100 ESP is a bit stiffer and bigger in frame size than Tour 100 16×18. But it’s 60$ cheaper than Tour 100 16×18. I wonder what your opinion would be on the Prince Tour Pro 100 ESP in comparison to Tour 100.

    • #59306
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      James,
      The Prince Tour Pro 100 ESP and the Prince Tour 100 are both great arm friendly racquet. The 100 ESP is not as flexible although it is still a flexible racquet but the open string pattern makes it play more flexible and also makes it easier to create spin. The 100 ESP will take some getting used to as it has a very unique feel. One downside of the 100 ESP is that the strings will break very easily unless you use the Prince tour which is a pretty stiff string and not very arm friendly.

  • #59160

    Gabriele

    Hi Thomas,
    for many years I played with a Babolat Pure Drive (I like the feel and the way it plays) but now I’m looking to something more soft for my arm.
    My list of potential buy are: Volkl super G V1 PRO, Wilson Blade 98 (18×20 or 16×19), Prince Tour 100P, Yonex DR 98. I also tried the Head graphene XT prestige MP but it’s a little to heavy.
    What would be your preferred order with the racquets above?
    Thank you very much.
    Gabriele

    • #59216
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Gabriele,
      All of the racquets you are considering are far more arm friendly than the Babolat Pure Drive, a racquet that has caused a lot of people arm problems. I especially like the Prince 100P and the Yonex Ezone Dr 98 since both are very flexible, my favorite may be the Yonex DR 98 since it has a more open string pattern and it has added anti vibration technology to its grip and frame.
      Tom

  • #58933

    Mike M.

    Thomas, I see you added the Prince Textreme 100P to the list. Can you comment on the new Prince Textreme Warrior 100? Specs look very similar except that the stiffness is a few points higher. Would it be considered arm friendly? Thank you for all you do.

    • #58967
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mike,
      The is only slightly above average in terms of its being arm friendly, although it has a head light balance and is reasonably heavy its flex is about average, while the Prince Textreme 100P is much more flexible and slightly heavier

  • #57664

    Meghan

    Hi there Thomas,
    Thank-you for your list! Do you have an updated one for 2015/16?
    Thanks again!
    Meghan

  • #58752

    Cam

    Hey
    I am in the market for a new racquet, wish to stay with Head as my brand. I have been looking at the newest Prestige. The Graphene XT MidPlus version. I noticed the old prestige youtek version is on your list.
    Was wondering what your take on this newest model for TE would be.
    I always use a multi string (hate polys).
    Thanks 🙂

    • #58833
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Cam,
      Thanks for bringing this to our attention. The Graphene XT MP is almost identical to the old prestige youtek which has been updated to the Head GrapheneXT Prestige Pro. The Graphene XT MP uses the same technology but is a very minor improvement as far as its arm friendly specs – it is slightly more head light in balance and slightly more flexible. I am going to update from the old prestige youtek which has been discontinued.

  • #58321

    Mark

    I’m looking to get a wilson pro staff 95S. I have trialed both the 2014 and 2015 model. Which in your opinion do you find to be the more arm friendly racket? Do you know the if there is a difference in flex, weight, etc. between the two? Thanks.

  • #57772

    Owen

    Hello, what’s your take on the new Yonex EZoneDR98, successor of the Ai98?
    Cheers, Owen

    • #58143
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Owen,
      I really like the YONEX EZONE DR 98 It is very similar to the YONEX EZONE Ai 98, but it is even more flexible due to its Nanometric DR material which provides more flexibility and resilience to the frame. It also incorporates the same Dual Shut System that reduces shock by 50% over traditional frames.

  • #57446

    sal Agati

    Hey Thomas
    My wife is a relatively new player. But she is progressing nicely and has become a more aggressive intermediate player. But she has really started to experience some real debilitating tennis elbow. She purchased a Volkl racquet and it has not helped at all with the pain. I saw your note above on the Babolat Storm. Would this be a good choice for her? And what string and tension would you recommend?
    best
    Sal

  • #56370

    Gerald

    Hi Thomas

    I am a good player and a hard hitter. I have 6 babolat pure aero racquets. I use rpm blast 18 gauge strung at 52 pounds. I had a long break from tennis for years and started playing a few months ago. If been playing well and about 5 times a week. I do not have any elbow issues but the back of my arm and shoulder are sore. I’ve taken a break for a bit and have ordered gut for mains and volkl for crosses.
    Then I’ll do some testing. Do I need to change racquets or should I try strings first ? If I change racquets what do I change to ?

    • #56459
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Gerald,
      The string change might help some but you are already stringing at a low tension and you are using a racquet that has received an awful lot of complaints about causing arm problems, so the racquet is your main problem. If you really want to eliminate problems it would be more beneficial for you to try some more flexible frames and get used to the feel, as a power hitter you will benefit from the control and feel of any of the racquets in my top 10 list http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets/

  • #56289
    Profile photo of gatorgville
    richard

    Trying to get rid of tennis elbow, I tried out some volkl racquets. I just got a volkl organix superg8 315g.
    It is 100 head size, 11.6 weight, 27 inch, but it has a stiffer head, I think 70 or 72.
    Am I wasting my time trying to cure elbow problems with this extra stiffness?
    so far, no taking a day off between playing, I am still getting sore at end of game.
    I didn’t think I could handle the weight, and if necessary, I realize there are other racquets out there.

  • #56292
    Profile photo of gatorgville
    richard

    It is so hard to try out demo racquets and get a good idea of what you like, because of the different string tensions which feel uncomfortable upon trial.
    Am I to assume all the racquets which meet your specifications list, are in the elbow friendly category? Because I have only been trying out the volkl and prokennex.

    • #56453
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Richard,

      I agree that demo racquets feel a little different because a lot of times the strings are not the best and by the time you use them they often have lost a lot of their tension. All I can say is try to demo from a reputable company and try to find out the tension and strings in advance.
      My list includes what I think are the 10 most arm friendly racquets currently on the market. In addition there are many other good arm friendly Pro Kennex and Volkl racquets some of which have been reviewed on this website also all the racquets on the top 10 list have been reviewed.

  • #56290
    Profile photo of gatorgville
    richard

    What is your opinion of the volka v1pro racquet. They recently came out with another model called the v1pro g model. 99.5, 11.3 strung, and a little more flex, more head light than before, etc. Is it in a good elbow friendly category?

    • #56452
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Richard,
      I do not like the Volkl V1 Pro, it is definitely too stiff. However the VOLKL Super G V1 Pro is a flexible racquet and more head light and I would consider this an arm friendly racquet.

  • #56051
    Profile photo of darios
    dario

    First of all congratulations for your website, I find it really usefull.

    I am a 48 man who’s got back into tennis after many years.
    I’ve recently developed some hand pain.

    I play an “old school” tennis: serve and volley, no rotation,
    one-handed backhand. I prefer more control than power.

    Which racket in your list could be the best choise for me?

    Thank you in advance.

    • #56451
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Dario,
      I do not know of any racquet that is particularly better for hand issues as opposed to any other arm issues. But my top 10 list has http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquets/ among the most arm friendly racquets out of hundreds of racquets so I would suggest you try out a few of those and see which you like best. Good luck!

  • #55407

    Alex

    I suffer from tennis elbow and really appreciate your site. I would like to purchase a recent design Head or Babolat in the range of $100 to $200 and have not seen a 2015 racquet on your list. Can you give me a review on one of the new latest and greatest in terms of material and construction from one of the aforementioned manufacturers. Thanking you in anticipation-Alex

    • #55556
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Alex,
      I have new reviews coming out all the time. If you want to be alerted join the mailing list. My top 10 list always has the best or at least very close to the best arm friendly racquets, I would not get too hung up on Brands Wilson, Head etc or the latest or newest technology the best arm friendly racquet might not be the newest racquet or come from the most popular manufacturer,

  • #54420

    Hi Thomas, so glad I found your website with excellent info. I was playing with the AeroPro drive for years until my TE flared up recently when I increased my play from once weekly/ biweekly to 3 times a week. I continue to sample racquets on your list. I’m also getting a Wilson Pro Staff 97 but am confused because the stiffness varies from different websites. Wilson does not list stiffness on their site, but I found it as 62 on one site, but 66 on a couple of other site. This Pro Staff 97 is not on your list, what is your view of this racquet in terms of elbow friendliness? Thank you.

    • #54833
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      George,
      I am not surprised that you have developed elbow problems after using the Babolat Aeropro Drive as that is one of the least arm friendly racquets on the market and I have seen a tremendous amount of complaints from people who have developed arm problems using that raquet. The Wilson Pro Staff 97 is a huge improvement. As far as the RA flex rating for that racquet it is difficult to say when you see variations from different resellers, although manufactures test there racquets unstrung and most resellers test them strung so I would hesitate to say the Wilson Pro Staff 97 is a top arm friendly racquet when I see a 66 Ra unless you can confirm that measurement was taken on a unstrung racquet.

  • #54604
    Profile photo of Clay Jones
    Clay

    Thanks Thomas. We conducted demos with three on ur top 10. We tried the Head, Yonex, and Technifibre. All three seemed to work well and help but she settled on the Technifibre. I have also ordered some NRG string on ur list. So far – after 4 hits with demos she doesn’t have any more pain. I appreciate ur site and help. He new racquets come in Wednesday. What a great service! Cheers.

  • #54299
    Profile photo of Clay Jones
    Clay

    Thomas – my 16 year old daughter has been having tremendous shoulder pain. She uses the Head Grapine Speed Pro (Djokovich racquet). She quits hitting and goes to rehab and her shoulder will feel good but once she starts hitting again by the third day it hurts again. I found ur site and am intrigued. Do u think one of ur top 10 would be a good move for her? I noticed her racquet has a 68 flex which I am sure is not helping her shoulder. Thanks for ur site and help.

    • #54588
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Clay,
      The stiffness of your daughter’s current racquet is definitely hurting her. You should look into switching to something on the top 10 list. Even switching to the HEAD YT Graphene Prestige Pro would be helpful.

  • #53323
    Profile photo of Tharcisio48
    Tharcisio

    Hi,

    I’m using currently a ProKennex Type C Redondo Edition 93. What do you say about this racquet?

  • #51997
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Dear Thomas,
    I have just demoed the Prince Tour 100 16×18(David Ferrer’s choice) and have to say it is a great racquet and flexible. I am surprised this racquet is not on your top 10 list of best arm friendly racquets that play well. Do you consider it too light to be a top arm friendly racquet or does not play so well overall?
    I would appreciate your opinion. Great site overall, thank you!

  • #51153

    Rafal

    It has been a while since the last post, but I find this website extremely useful. Just to add – I have had a very good experience with ProKennex Redondo racquets, which never caused any problems or pain to my arm. After testing variety of options, it is now my racquet of choice.

  • #51040
    Profile photo of Tom Palmer
    Tom Palmer

    Have you reviewed the new diadem strings. Their specs indicate co-poly but claim softness. I am currently using two of your recommended strings but really would like an increase in power.

  • #50869

    Michael

    Hi Thomas,

    Having suffered from TE recently, I have learned a lot about arm friendly rackets from browsing through your website which is excellent – thanks.

    After reading reviews, I am considering buying the new 2015 Wilson Pro Staff 97. Looking through through the specs of the racket, it seems to meet the requirements of an arm friendly racket but I am a little unsure if this is the case.

    Can you tell me if my thinking is on the right track?

    Thanks,

    Michael.

    • #50897
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Michael,
      The Wilson Pro Staff 97 is a very arm friendly racquet it is heavy enough, has a very head light balance is quite flexible and also has an open string pattern. If you like the feel of this racquet I would recommend it.

      • #50948

        Michael

        Thanks Thomas, your response is appreciated.

        Wilson have also brought out a new Pro Staff 97S with exactly the same specs as the 97 but with a more open string pattern for spin which also might be worth considering.

        Michael.

        • #50964
          Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
          Thomas Tennis
          Keymaster

          Michael,
          Wilson the does not have a 97S but they carry the 97LS which is considerably lighter but the 95S has nearly the identical spec’s but has a slightly smaller head. The open string pattern is more arm friendly because it plays like a more flexible racquet.

  • #50680
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Dear Thomas,
    Also, considering Prince Tour 95, Prince Tour Pro 98 and Prince Tour 100 16×18, which one would you consider to be the most arm-friendly?
    I would appreciate your opinion.
    Thank you.
    Lucian

    • #50856
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucian,
      You really did your homework all 3 are great choices I would say the Prince Tour 100 16 x 18 might slightly bet out the Prince Tour Pro 98 since it has a slightly more open string pattern but these are very similar so it really would be a personal choice to see which feels better to you. Also the Prince Tour 95 is a great arm friendly racquet but it might feel a bit heavy for some players but if you like the feel I would recommend it.

  • #50740

    cem

    Hi Thomas,

    Great site, great info.

    Wilson Pro staff 95S is a bit heavier for me. So I decided to choose Prostaff 100LS. But Io hesitate because of tennis elbow. Can I think that 100 LS is arm friendly? Thank you in advance for your answer.

    • #50855
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      cem,

      The Wilson Pro Staff is not as arm friendly as the Wilson Pro Staff 95s, but it still is relatively flexible with a head lite balance the only negative is its lightweight so I would still give it an above average arm friendly rating. The lightweight is less of a problem if you are a beginner or possibly an intermediate but for an advanced player who faces some big hitters this racquet would put some strain on your arm because it would not have the stability to stand up to some big shots.

  • #50693

    Mark

    Mike,
    I currently have Gamma Glide 16 in the crosses at 57 lbs and Gamma Moto 17 in the mains at 54 lbs. I’m about to get a stringing machine so I can experiment. I’d like to try NRG2 in the crosses and a few shaped strings in the mains.

  • #50615
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Hi Thomas,
    I would like to know your opinion about Prince Tour 95 and Prince Textreme Tour 95. Thank you.

  • #50593

    Mike M

    Tom, really appreciate your website and all you do. I wanted to weigh in with my story and what has worked for me with help from this site.
    I was using a Prince DB 26 Mid Plus from the early 90’s. I wanted to upgrade to something newer and more arm friendly. I have had tennis elbow for years(over 10) located in more of the underside of the elbow.(golfers elbow?)
    I wanted something to play with that would be somewhat similiar to what I had but provide the relief I was looking for. I tried The Pro Kenex and a few of the Prince frames on your list. When the Prince Tour 100 16 x 18 came out, It looked like a good possibility. I tried the demo and along with it the Tour 100 18 x 20 and the Prince Warrior 100 as well.

    The feel of the Tour 100 16 x 18 was plush and soft as advertised. I have always liked a flexible feel and this was great. It quickly stood out from the others. When I got the racquet, the feel was not the same as the demo. It took numerous string types to get the feel I was looking for. I ruled out any poly string because of arm concerns. I settled on Head “Intellitour” 16G strings at 50 Lbs. I have used this for the last 6 months.
    To date, no arm problem. None! It took a few weeks to begin to dissipate but little by little it got better. The other thing I did was to abandon my one hand backhand and swith to a two hander. I believe some of the problem was related to off center hits off that side. I also spent some time on changing my 70’s forehand to a more modern swing which has really improved my overall game.
    Bottom line is your information is accurate and appreciated! When I found this site, I was considering giving up tennis. Just didnt seem viable going forward. I would reccommend this racquet to anyone who likes a flexible soft feel, great control and adaquate power in an arm friendly stick.

    Regards,

    Mike M Lake Mary, FL 4.0 player

  • #50475
    Profile photo of Shula
    Shula
    Participant

    Hi Tom:
    Thank you for your response. The Yonex vcore 97 310g that I have been demoing is actually 10.9. My other vcore 97 was 11.6ozs. I am very torn between the Ai 98 and the lighter vcore 97.
    Thanks again for your next response.
    Shula

  • #50403
    Profile photo of Shula
    Shula
    Participant

    Hi Thomas:
    I have been playing with the Yonex pro tour 97, 330g. I am try I got to move to a lighter racket. I had tennis elbow many years ago, was told that a heavier racket would be better for me. I have tried the following demos:
    Yonex Ai 98, and the lighter, 310g Yonex pro tour 97. I liked both rackets. I also tried the new Technifibre flight, 300g.

    What are your thoughts? Should I switch to the 98, or stay with the lighter version of th 97. How does the Technifibre compare?

    Thanks
    Shula

    • #50433
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Shula,
      Out of the racquets you mention your best bet is the Yonex Ai 98 the Yonex pro tour 97 is actually 12.2 oz or about 345g plus it is slightly stiffer. The Technifibre flight 300 is pretty stiff maybe you should consider the TECNIFIBRE 2013 Tfight 315

  • #50155

    Rowland

    Hello, Is the the racket I am playing with ok? It’s the old Head Genesis 660 (specs here: http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/head-genesis-660-midplus-102-mp-110402404). Thanks.

  • #50152

    Haroldo Bukman

    Hi Thomas,

    Nowadays I´m playing with one Prokennex 15g light.
    My problems with tennis elbow desappeared.
    In the past I was playing with Yonex RD TI 70 long. Old model.
    What do you think about this Yonex model related to tennis elbow problems?

    Thanks,

    Haroldo

  • #50146

    mike

    Thomas,
    What are your thoughts on the WILSON Five 103 BLX Tennis Racquet? The new damping system seems to reduce vibration.

    • #50161
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Mike,
      The Wilson Five 103 BLX is very unique because it has some characteristics that are typically very bad for your arm such as being very lightweight and head heavy, but that is counteracted with its extremely high flex, the most flexible racquet I’ve ever seen plus it has the added technology for vibration dampening. I definitely would not recommend this racquet to an advanced level player since its extreme lightweight would make it very unstable if you are playing a powerful opponent. As far as how good this racquet is for your arm the jury is out and time will tell. So you would be taking a bit of a risk with this but if you love the lightweight maybe its worth it for you.

      • #50186

        mike

        Thomas thank you for the advise. I am a 3.5 player with a medium to slow swing. My elbow is in bad shape. Currently use the Volki V1 MP. Any suggestion on a racket and string?

  • #49791
    Profile photo of stephanie
    Stephanie

    Hi! I just started tennis last August. I am a petite 5 feet lady. I am currently recovering from a bad tennis elbow & am looking for a new tennis racket for when i am ready to play again. Right now, I have the Head Instinct S. I just re-strung with NXT 17. I am leaning towards Ferrer’s Prince Tour 100 (16×18). What do you think? Appreciate any input. Thanks!

    • #49900
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Stephanie,

      I can see how you had problems using the Head Instinct S that racquet is awful for tennis elbow. The Prince Tour 100 (16×18) is a very arm friendly racquet and would be a huge improvement. I would try it to see if you can get used to the heavier weight I few other arm friendly racquets that are a bit lighter are the Wilson Blade 104 and the Prince Textreme Tour 100T

  • #49647
    Profile photo of Lucian T.
    Lucian

    Thomas,
    I will demo the Yonex Ezone AI 98 this week for couple of days. What type of string do you recommend to use considering I have this option? Thank you alot.

    • #49891
      Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
      Thomas Tennis
      Keymaster

      Lucien,
      I don’t have a particular string to recommend for that racquet but I certainly would refer you to

      Tennis Strings

  • #49637

    Chris

    Hi Thomas,

    Whats your opinion on the Babolat Pure Drive FO Edition and BABOLAT Pure Control 95 GT racquet? Are they arm friendly?

  • #49351</