Home Forums Tennis Racquets Forum Tennis Racquets

This topic contains 548 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Thomas_Tennis 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 552 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #61049 Reply

    Sangam

    (Awaiting moderation)

    #60780 Reply

    Thomas_Tennis

    Carrie,
    It is the Head Prestige, just click on the link. All 10 racquets in the top 10 list are very arm friendly, you just have to pick the one you personally like best and you cant go wrong

    #60755 Reply

    carrie

    HI Thomas
    Thanx. But regarding the Head xt graphene mp on your list.. Is it the prestige? When I google it it comes as prestige or speed etc.

    Also…I do suffer from severe tennis elbow so which of your racquets is the very best one??
    Thanx.

     

     

    #60761 Reply

    Andrew

    Hey Thomas,

    What are your thoughts on the Prince textreme warrior 107? I am hoping it is arm friendly enough that i don’t have to sell them and get the 100p! Been having arm and shoulder problems but could be attributed to me being excited to play again after two years and just overworking myself.

    Thank You!

    #60752 Reply

    Mohan

    Coach,
    Thanks a lot. Elbow pain is gone and am playing my 4.0 game again at age 52. Only change I had to do is decrease the tension down to 40lb on my natural gut strings. This racket has more closed pattern when compared to my previous one wilson 97 RF LS. Strings dont move much in my yonex. Thanks once again.

    #60743 Reply

    Thomas_Tennis

    Carrie,
    There are a number of Head XT Graphene Speed Racquets so I do not know which one you are refering to and none of them are the same as the HEAD XT Graphene MP that is on my top 10 list

    #60731 Reply

    carrie

    What is your opinion re the headXTR speed grapheme Is it te same as the one on your list?
    Head XT Graphene MP

    #60697 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Leonardo,
    The Prince Textreme Tour 100p would be a lot more arm friendly than the Aeropro Drive 2013 or the Babolat Pure Aero it is also more arm friendly than the Warrior 100.

    #60696 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Leonardo,
    The Prince Textreme Tour 100p would be a lot more arm friendly than the Aeropro Drive 2013 or the Babolat Pure Aero it is also more arm friendly than the Warrior 100.

    #60694 Reply

    Leandro

    Hello Thomas!

    I always play with Babolat rackets since i start playing tennis (13 years ago, now im 25) and never had a problem.
    I was playing with Aeropro Drive 2013 (grip 3) strung with RPM Blast at 58lb. In february of this year, i buy the new Babolat Pure Aero (grip 2) and strung with Luxilon Alu Power at 54lb. After two hitting sessions, i get tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow and wrist pain so i sold it.
    I start to play again three weeks ago, back with my Aeropro Drive 2013 and no have a problem, but during a match, i break strings and have to change racket and i have to play with Aeropro Drive GT strung with RPM Team at 55lb. After ten minutes, my elbow start to hurt me again so i stoped and resting until i could came back but now i decide to leave babolat and switch racket more arm friendly.

    I was looking for Prince Textreme Tour 100p and Warrior 100, what would you recommend me?

    Also i would like to keep using poly strings but at lower tension.

    thanks!

    #60632 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster

    Thomas,
    Both the Yonex AI DR 98 and the Prince Tour 100 are very arm friendly racquets. The only problem with the Prince Tour 100 is that it has been out of production for at least a year so you will not be able to get one that is truely new, the best you will be able to do is get a unused one.

    #60605 Reply

    JP

    Hello Thomas,
    For the past year I´ve been playing with a ProKennex KI15 260 and haven´t been able to get rid of my tennis elbow. Have changed my grip, my posture on both my forehand and backhand and have improved my looking at the ball (not all the times) and my follow through on my swing but still can’t play more than once or twice a week without developing a considerable amount of pain. I have gone to the orthopedist and recommended some serious physical therapy, which I have been doing on a more or less consistent basis. Nevertheless, I bought three of the racquets you mentioned here a year ago and Prince I couldn´t use Yonex is somehow better but Volk seems to make it for me with the addition of some weight on the head. The problem is that I need some adjustment on my swing and get too lazy to do it so I just go back to what works for me, KI15 260. It seems to be my impression but every time I use a 300 grams or over racquet my pain intensifies. All of them with hybrid FXP and 60 lbs of tension. The last addition is a ProKennex KI20, which also seems to be really good with my arm but no real power and lots of balls at the net. I go back to the KI15 but it hurts my arm. I am even developing my left arm to be able to continue my game. As you can see I have a big resolution NOT to let this elbow, epicondylitis define my love for the sport. Hope you have the chance to share your valuable feedback with me. Best always,
    JP

    #60602 Reply

    thomas

    Thomas thanks for your answer,so ai/dr 98 is more arm friendly from my ig speed mp 300,what about compare it to prince tour pro 100 16/19?
    Must make the final decision here!I like them both but i think tour pro is more arm friendly than ai 98,i use cyclone tour 22/23 kg the last months and probably stick with that

    #60604 Reply

    Gustavo

    Thomas:

    Thank you very much. Regards. Gustavo.

    #60598 Reply

    Ted Murphy

    I have a damaged elbow from playing with dead strings and hitting with too open a stance on my forehand. It requires surgery to heal and I’m not up to having it. I have changed from a semi-western forehand grip to an Eastern so that I cannot hit the ball as hard. It has helped.

    Here are additional findings: I like denser string patterns (18 x 20) because I can string the racquet looser without losing control. (The dense string bed plays stiffer than an open one and the ball will come in contact with more string to enhance control.) Also, I like thicker strings (15L) to enhance control and durability on loose string jobs.

    Multifilament strings are best – they are softer. Likewise with natural gut. Avoid stiff strings (esp. stiff polyester ones). Experiment with looser strings as they have less vibration and enhance stability.

    Larger head frames are best – they are more forgiving. However, few have dense string patterns. Don’t go too big or you will lose some maneuverability. A larger head will also be more stable and put less pressure on the hand to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand.

    Slightly head heavy frames (1-2 points head heavy) are best because they absorb shock well and slow a player’s swing. The slower the swing, the less shock on the arm/elbow/wrist. A head heavy frame is also more stable. I bought a Head Microgel Oversize and added lead tape at the 3 and 9 o’clock positions of the head to reduce shock. It helped a lot!

    Flexible racquets are best but too flexible ones may have vibration. Always check a frame’s RA (stiffness level) and think twice before buying a frame with a 68 RA measurement or higher. I prefer an RA rating of about 60.

    Standard 27 inch frames are best as they are easier to swing, requiring less effort on the arm. That being said, I have a 27.5″ frame that is oversize and I play well with it. I let the frame do the work and focus on making contact in the sweet spot. It’s important to watch the ball hitting the strings so that it hits the sweet spot more often. The additional length gives me more spin, better reach and more power with less effort. (It’s a slightly head heavy frame.)

    Use as large a grip size as is comfortable – you will not have to squeeze the grip as hard to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand. If you like head light frames, get a heavy one (11 ounces or more) to reduce shock and twisting. I also like a flatter grip shape, e.g., Volkl frames, to enhance stability on my Eastern grip forehand.

    Select a frame with good vibration dampening abilities, e.g., with Textreme (or similar shock decreasing product like Countervail), a built in string vibration dampener in the bridge or large grommets / ports.

    Correct poor technique. Try to use less wrist on your shots; use more shoulder turn instead. Take a lesson if necessary to correct your technique if needed.

    I hope this helps.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #61049 Reply

    Sangam
    • Offline

    (Awaiting moderation)

    #60780 Reply

    Thomas_Tennis
    • Offline

    Carrie,
    It is the Head Prestige, just click on the link. All 10 racquets in the top 10 list are very arm friendly, you just have to pick the one you personally like best and you cant go wrong

    #60755 Reply

    carrie
    • Offline

    HI Thomas
    Thanx. But regarding the Head xt graphene mp on your list.. Is it the prestige? When I google it it comes as prestige or speed etc.

    Also…I do suffer from severe tennis elbow so which of your racquets is the very best one??
    Thanx.

     

     

    #60761 Reply

    Andrew
    • Offline

    Hey Thomas,

    What are your thoughts on the Prince textreme warrior 107? I am hoping it is arm friendly enough that i don’t have to sell them and get the 100p! Been having arm and shoulder problems but could be attributed to me being excited to play again after two years and just overworking myself.

    Thank You!

    #60752 Reply

    Mohan
    • Offline

    Coach,
    Thanks a lot. Elbow pain is gone and am playing my 4.0 game again at age 52. Only change I had to do is decrease the tension down to 40lb on my natural gut strings. This racket has more closed pattern when compared to my previous one wilson 97 RF LS. Strings dont move much in my yonex. Thanks once again.

    #60743 Reply

    Thomas_Tennis
    • Offline

    Carrie,
    There are a number of Head XT Graphene Speed Racquets so I do not know which one you are refering to and none of them are the same as the HEAD XT Graphene MP that is on my top 10 list

    #60731 Reply

    carrie
    • Offline

    What is your opinion re the headXTR speed grapheme Is it te same as the one on your list?
    Head XT Graphene MP

    #60697 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Leonardo,
    The Prince Textreme Tour 100p would be a lot more arm friendly than the Aeropro Drive 2013 or the Babolat Pure Aero it is also more arm friendly than the Warrior 100.

    #60696 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Leonardo,
    The Prince Textreme Tour 100p would be a lot more arm friendly than the Aeropro Drive 2013 or the Babolat Pure Aero it is also more arm friendly than the Warrior 100.

    #60694 Reply

    Leandro
    • Offline

    Hello Thomas!

    I always play with Babolat rackets since i start playing tennis (13 years ago, now im 25) and never had a problem.
    I was playing with Aeropro Drive 2013 (grip 3) strung with RPM Blast at 58lb. In february of this year, i buy the new Babolat Pure Aero (grip 2) and strung with Luxilon Alu Power at 54lb. After two hitting sessions, i get tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow and wrist pain so i sold it.
    I start to play again three weeks ago, back with my Aeropro Drive 2013 and no have a problem, but during a match, i break strings and have to change racket and i have to play with Aeropro Drive GT strung with RPM Team at 55lb. After ten minutes, my elbow start to hurt me again so i stoped and resting until i could came back but now i decide to leave babolat and switch racket more arm friendly.

    I was looking for Prince Textreme Tour 100p and Warrior 100, what would you recommend me?

    Also i would like to keep using poly strings but at lower tension.

    thanks!

    #60632 Reply
    Profile photo of Thomas Tennis
    Thomas Tennis
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Thomas,
    Both the Yonex AI DR 98 and the Prince Tour 100 are very arm friendly racquets. The only problem with the Prince Tour 100 is that it has been out of production for at least a year so you will not be able to get one that is truely new, the best you will be able to do is get a unused one.

    #60605 Reply

    JP
    • Offline

    Hello Thomas,
    For the past year I´ve been playing with a ProKennex KI15 260 and haven´t been able to get rid of my tennis elbow. Have changed my grip, my posture on both my forehand and backhand and have improved my looking at the ball (not all the times) and my follow through on my swing but still can’t play more than once or twice a week without developing a considerable amount of pain. I have gone to the orthopedist and recommended some serious physical therapy, which I have been doing on a more or less consistent basis. Nevertheless, I bought three of the racquets you mentioned here a year ago and Prince I couldn´t use Yonex is somehow better but Volk seems to make it for me with the addition of some weight on the head. The problem is that I need some adjustment on my swing and get too lazy to do it so I just go back to what works for me, KI15 260. It seems to be my impression but every time I use a 300 grams or over racquet my pain intensifies. All of them with hybrid FXP and 60 lbs of tension. The last addition is a ProKennex KI20, which also seems to be really good with my arm but no real power and lots of balls at the net. I go back to the KI15 but it hurts my arm. I am even developing my left arm to be able to continue my game. As you can see I have a big resolution NOT to let this elbow, epicondylitis define my love for the sport. Hope you have the chance to share your valuable feedback with me. Best always,
    JP

    #60602 Reply

    thomas
    • Offline

    Thomas thanks for your answer,so ai/dr 98 is more arm friendly from my ig speed mp 300,what about compare it to prince tour pro 100 16/19?
    Must make the final decision here!I like them both but i think tour pro is more arm friendly than ai 98,i use cyclone tour 22/23 kg the last months and probably stick with that

    #60604 Reply

    Gustavo
    • Offline

    Thomas:

    Thank you very much. Regards. Gustavo.

    #60598 Reply

    Ted Murphy
    • Offline

    I have a damaged elbow from playing with dead strings and hitting with too open a stance on my forehand. It requires surgery to heal and I’m not up to having it. I have changed from a semi-western forehand grip to an Eastern so that I cannot hit the ball as hard. It has helped.

    Here are additional findings: I like denser string patterns (18 x 20) because I can string the racquet looser without losing control. (The dense string bed plays stiffer than an open one and the ball will come in contact with more string to enhance control.) Also, I like thicker strings (15L) to enhance control and durability on loose string jobs.

    Multifilament strings are best – they are softer. Likewise with natural gut. Avoid stiff strings (esp. stiff polyester ones). Experiment with looser strings as they have less vibration and enhance stability.

    Larger head frames are best – they are more forgiving. However, few have dense string patterns. Don’t go too big or you will lose some maneuverability. A larger head will also be more stable and put less pressure on the hand to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand.

    Slightly head heavy frames (1-2 points head heavy) are best because they absorb shock well and slow a player’s swing. The slower the swing, the less shock on the arm/elbow/wrist. A head heavy frame is also more stable. I bought a Head Microgel Oversize and added lead tape at the 3 and 9 o’clock positions of the head to reduce shock. It helped a lot!

    Flexible racquets are best but too flexible ones may have vibration. Always check a frame’s RA (stiffness level) and think twice before buying a frame with a 68 RA measurement or higher. I prefer an RA rating of about 60.

    Standard 27 inch frames are best as they are easier to swing, requiring less effort on the arm. That being said, I have a 27.5″ frame that is oversize and I play well with it. I let the frame do the work and focus on making contact in the sweet spot. It’s important to watch the ball hitting the strings so that it hits the sweet spot more often. The additional length gives me more spin, better reach and more power with less effort. (It’s a slightly head heavy frame.)

    Use as large a grip size as is comfortable – you will not have to squeeze the grip as hard to keep the racquet from twisting in your hand. If you like head light frames, get a heavy one (11 ounces or more) to reduce shock and twisting. I also like a flatter grip shape, e.g., Volkl frames, to enhance stability on my Eastern grip forehand.

    Select a frame with good vibration dampening abilities, e.g., with Textreme (or similar shock decreasing product like Countervail), a built in string vibration dampener in the bridge or large grommets / ports.

    Correct poor technique. Try to use less wrist on your shots; use more shoulder turn instead. Take a lesson if necessary to correct your technique if needed.

    I hope this helps.

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